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Old 11-08-2013, 12:48 PM   #91
TealLA
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Great pictures and stories! I am really enjoying your RR.

Some really nice dialogue as well. Travel really opens the eyes and makes one think about the world around them
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Old 11-08-2013, 09:21 PM   #92
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Cool2 All in a day's work



Woken up by the call from the “gallo” at the crack of dawn, feed a hungry dog your last smoked chuleta, and twist the throttle. Heading for the volcanoes of Guatemala on your way to the Salvadorian border. Miss your exit and get lost for an hour or so. Lane split a couple miles of lories, and other road monsters to be the first in line at the aduana.

Out of Guatemala in 10 minutes, into Salvador in an hour. Ride another hundred km into the twisty Pacific coast. In and out of tunnels. Find your dwelling in playa Tunco just in time to splash in the waves rincing off the heat and humidity of the day, shoot the sunset, and drink a well deserve local pils.

This was the kind of day it was for Jackie and Valentino on this November 8, 2013.

All in a day’s work.


Photos à l’appui


Acatenango - Volcan de Fuego - Volcan de Agua













Street market




Threading the lories









Tail-gate party Guatever style





At the aduana





Jackie fixer extraordinaire.





Does this make my ass look big





Where to from here?





Welcome to Salvador








Salvadorian cows in the distance




Walking around Delhi style





Back on the coast





Into the dark





Red skies at night, sailors delight





Well deserved



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FEAR ===> False Expectation About Reality. GSA08
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The motorcycle chronicles of Jackie & Valentino
The Southern Episode

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Old 11-08-2013, 11:44 PM   #93
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Authenticity ...

Please know that we are genuinely living vicariously through you and your travels at this moment
Our temperatures have dropped and our skies are grey. Yup, typical November weather here on the wet coast of BC. And you say you haven't ridden through a rain shower since Washington/Oregon ??!! Harrumph!
Continue to take care, you two. Keep the pictures and commentary coming so that we can close our eyes to the rain and imagine we're riding along with you.
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Old 11-09-2013, 08:39 AM   #94
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BuggyCrewNextDoor View Post
Please know that we are genuinely living vicariously through you and your travels at this moment
Our temperatures have dropped and our skies are grey. Yup, typical November weather here on the wet coast of BC. And you say you haven't ridden through a rain shower since Washington/Oregon ??!! Harrumph!
Continue to take care, you two. Keep the pictures and commentary coming so that we can close our eyes to the rain and imagine we're riding along with you.
Hi guys

You are authentically and definitely funny, thanks for following along.

Now going breakfast hunting
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The Southern Episode
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Old 11-12-2013, 09:57 AM   #95
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Re local development....I was reading the "Oasis of my Soul" blog (ride report is here at adv) and noticed that Ara seems to be able to do a lot of cooking with a solar oven which made me think that for certain sunny parts of the world where people (usually women) have to walk for hours every day to find firewood, a solar oven might be a great thing to free up time for them to participate in the kind of local development activity I think you are talking about. Am I on the right track?
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Old 11-12-2013, 09:12 PM   #96
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Originally Posted by Blader54 View Post
Re local development....I was reading the "Oasis of my Soul" blog (ride report is here at adv) and noticed that Ara seems to be able to do a lot of cooking with a solar oven which made me think that for certain sunny parts of the world where people (usually women) have to walk for hours every day to find firewood, a solar oven might be a great thing to free up time for them to participate in the kind of local development activity I think you are talking about. Am I on the right track?
Any effort to provide self-sufficient low-cost, and environmentally sound energy to people who do not have access to electricity or have to pay money they don't have to private foreign corporation for access, is a step in the right direction. The only problem is that there is no money in it...

The Centre for Environmental Education (CEE) is one of the organization at the forefront of initiatives of that nature
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The Southern Episode
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Old 11-12-2013, 09:47 PM   #97
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San Salvador





We left the volcanic black sand beach of Playa Tunco, a small surf town nestled on the Pacific coast just before La Libertad. Everything was gated and guarded. From there we rode the 30 or so km to the capital San Salvador.




We did not have a particular interest for the city, other than the BMW shop. I needed to replace a couple of items that were stolen from the crash bar bag in Palenque. So we found a B&B walking distance from the shop, and booked for a couple of nights with our host Eduardo on Pje Maracaibo. We arrived on Sunday afternoon.

Eduardo is a surgeon and performs periodically when he is not running the hostel. The place was nice enough, clean enough, etc enough… but there was a bit of an “Hotel California vibe to it”

-“You can check out anytime you want but you can never leave” type thing.

Everything barb wired and padlock. We had breakfast and dinner at the hostel and we were the only guess. The dinning room was a bit creepy, with shady lighting, and the whole family would walk in one by one at regular interval, look at us say -“buenas tardes” or something applicable, and disappear in the kitchen carefully closing the door behind them. We were asked what we wanted for dinner around 1500 when we came back from our walk in the neighbourhood, picked something from the menu and agreed to come for dinner at 1900. We showed up at about 1845 and got dinner at about 2030; it was funny because the sons, daughters, abuelita, cook, and the surgeon kept walking in the dinning room, give us a quick gaze – or not, then dart in the kitchen, and carefully close the door as if there was a secret ritual been performed, and we where either not invited to the party or would end up as the sacrificial lamb.

In the end it was all-good, and we woke up without any new scars and all our organs still in place.




Yesterday we walked to the dealership and spoke with the bike mechanic who told us that he only had one oil filler cap wrench and one oil filter wrench, and that they were part of his tool kit and he could not part with them.

They had nothing else in stock. Not such a big deal, as I found a way to open/close the oil filler cap, and I’ll figure a way to remove the oil filter when the time comes.




So granted that we were not in the best neighbourhood of San Salvador, and I do not want to generalize, but even riding through the city we did not see anything really noteworthy. It just does not seem to be a great place to live in. Guards with shotguns at the entrance of every store, and soldiers with M16’s in public places like the mall, schools, and bus terminal. A lot of eight feet tall steel fences adorned with razor wire.




All the people we met were nice and pleasant, and answered all our questions with a smile. We walk around during the day, and never felt unsafe or threaten, however same as the downtown of many US cities, I visited; I don’t think I would be walking around at night by myself without been very familiar with the area.




I know it’s all about fears, and they are likely my own, but you cannot help but see the signs all around you. Reading the faces you can catch a certain edge in people eyes, fear, surprise, something hard to describe, you know it when you see it. I remember noting a similar ambience when riding through Napoli at the height of the trash war the Camera was wagging against the citizen of this great Italian city in 2008.

I kept asking myself how it would be to live in such a place, were the threat of violence, crime, and guns is omnipresent, the smell of sewer, the dirty and shambled buildings, the littered streets… It is so counterintuitive to what makes us thrive as human beings.

Not only that but in a country that is so overwhelmed by a foreign dominion that it chose to forfeit its own currency. Think about it for a second… Every time you pay for something you are reminded of your economic dependence. In a world where everything weighs on money, I can’t imagine how it could be to constantly be reminded that the fruit of your labor is monetized through a currency that is not your own, and that subsequently the great majority of what you spend is to buy goods from places harboring effigies of the same foreign nation. Evidently Salvador is but a receptacle of Americana, where KFC, Pizza Hut, and other fast food chain reign, more than we saw in Guatemala and Mexico. Most of what to buy, especially what you consume is woven with US culture. We saw the most overweight people since leaving the US. Obesity in El Salvador rates at 28.5% (2008), just 5% less than that of the US.

Food was not so great either, we had Pupusas, a fat tortilla stuffed with either frijoles, queso, pollo, or algo mas, and a couple of more “typical” dishes; verdict not so great.

The ride between the capital and San Miguel was pleasant enough but far from outstanding.

Coming in from Mexico where the food, people, cities, and scenery where so amazing, we found the landscape dotted with volcano really amazing but the Guatemalans were somewhat aloof.

Salvadorians appear friendlier, but apart from the pleasant interaction we had with the locals, we found what we saw of the country of little interest. Not everything is always amazing, but it’s all good, all part of it.


A nice pile of junk




First you spread it thin




Let it dry for a while




Pile it







And finally pack it




A few more from the road




There is always room for one tiny box more






Tomorrow is ADUANA day, Jackie will be busy:

Out of Sal, into Hon, out of Hon, and into Nic.

We are heading for Leon.
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FEAR ===> False Expectation About Reality. GSA08
Work is just the time you have to spend between rides.

The motorcycle chronicles of Jackie & Valentino
The Southern Episode

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Old 11-13-2013, 05:16 PM   #98
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Originally Posted by ac_elite View Post
Any effort to provide self-sufficient low-cost, and environmentally sound energy to people who do not have access to electricity or have to pay money they don't have to private foreign corporation for access, is a step in the right direction. The only problem is that there is no money in it...

The Centre for Environmental Education (CEE) is one of the organization at the forefront of initiatives of that nature
Yup, it all comes with some kind of cost and the problem is that the people who most need these solutions are also the least likely to have hard cash or even to live in a society where currency is the medium of exchange. The solar oven company seems very open to the idea of supplying kits to a locally-owned or community-owned factory where they could be assembled geographically close to the people who need them; and they even have a very large model that is intended to function as a bakery, thus producing a product the people could sell at a market.....BUT....even producing the kits has a cost. (and the bakery oven idea only works if the people proposed to use it have baked goods as part of their culture). I still keep thinking how much better it would be all around if a government, say the US govt, was thought of as the country that made it possible for them to improve their lives with solar ovens or cranked radios rather than the country that sold helos or AR-15s. IIRC this was one of the things that Kwitney concluded in his book, that the US would be better off providing humanitarian aid wherever it is needed rather than trying to "predict the winner" and supply him with guns and ammo....etc.

Hope your "Day of the Aduana" (lol like the reference...."Night of the ....") went well. Looking forward to your approach toward getting past "the gap".

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Old 11-14-2013, 10:14 AM   #99
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Fascinating

Seems like just yesterday you guys were at the "shop" having Don change your tires. It's been fascinating following along with your adventure and seeing all the great photos, reading the commentary. Traveling the world is something everyone should do (ideally). It might go a long way toward a better world for everyone. Hopefully, those Heidenaus are treating you well. :ymca

Continued safe travels to both of you.

As Don would say, rubber side down, fuzzy side up.
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Old 11-14-2013, 04:17 PM   #100
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Quote:
Originally Posted by knownway View Post
Seems like just yesterday you guys were at the "shop" having Don change your tires. It's been fascinating following along with your adventure and seeing all the great photos, reading the commentary. Traveling the world is something everyone should do (ideally). It might go a long way toward a better world for everyone. Hopefully, those Heidenaus are treating you well. :ymca

Continued safe travels to both of you.

As Don would say, rubber side down, fuzzy side up.
Great to hear from you Debbie, sending you warm and humid greetings from Leon, Nicaragua.

After 10000 km the Heidies are still looking pretty good


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FEAR ===> False Expectation About Reality. GSA08
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The motorcycle chronicles of Jackie & Valentino
The Southern Episode

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Old 11-14-2013, 05:29 PM   #101
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Cool2 On Aduana & Imigracion



A lot has been said and read about crossing Central American borders. About the interminable wait, the complicated procedures, the difficult to find, sometimes absent officials, the non-descript official buildings, etc, etc…

Well, yesterday was border day for us and it went something like this:

At Salvador exit 0755 done @ 0810
At Honduras entrance 0813 done @ 0911
At Honduras exit 1155 done @ 1218
At Nicaragua entrance 1220 done @ 1314

Granted speaking Spanish helps. But then again, anyone with a minimum of knowledge, say... Lonelyplanet phrase-book level, some patience, a smile and common sense should be able to breeze through all these border crossings without any difficulties at all.




I want to debunk the myth a bit. Look for no specifics here. In all cases, when you first arrive look for someone usually at a narrow booth that is dressed in some type of official uniform, they may or may not ask you to show them your passport, but will inevitably direct you to a place to park your ride. Pick a shaded spot.

Next identify the two places that you need to interact with; Aduana (bike) and Imigracion (you).

Ignore the touts for help: no gracias, no necesito ayuda, and smile. You might have to repeat this a few times.


Entry:
Aduana
You need vehicle registration or title; Canadians do not have titles for their vehicles, only registrations, and your driver’s licence. Inadvertently an official will fill in a form to transfer your information into an import vehicle form, this may be done by hand, typed or entered in a computer.

You may or may not need copies of that document, and you may or may not have to get it stamped by another official who may or may not verify your VIN. Usually that person is standing outside not very far from aduana

Aduana will likely require 1 to 3 copies of your registration/title, passport and DL, you may or may not have to pay a fee.


Jackie fixing the fixer


Fumigacion
The bottom half of your bike gets fumigated, you pay a small fee.




Imigracion
You show your passport you may or may not get a stamp you may or may not pay a fee.


Copias
You are likely to have to visit the little shack named “Copias” to make copies of your stamped or completed paperwork.

You may or may not have to show that you have completed all these steps correctly to one final guard/official at a control post prior to hitting the road again.

This process takes anywhere from 45 minutes to 1hour 30 minutes, of course -YMMV-


The copy shop


Exit is quicker
As you arrive at the crossing an official may or may not look at your paperwork and will then direct you to Aduana and Imigracion.

Aduana
An official will look at your vehicle entry form, and will likely stamp it; you may or may not need the vehicle entry form from the previous country to enter into the next.

Imigracion will look at your passport, and entry form if applicable, they may or may not stamp them.

This process takes anywhere from 5 to 20 minutes.


I got the disease, I can't stop taking pictures of motos

Small



Beeg





Moneychangers

We found it most practical to have a minimum of the local currency left when leaving the country. The moneychangers are there to make a living, so just think of them as the same as the foreign exchange counter at any airport, except; it will be hot, it will be humid, and they are likely to be wearing sandals. Instead of being behind a glass counter, they carry huge piles of cash and a satchel.




Know the official rate for the currency you are changing from/to, ask them how much they will give you for a determined amount, if you can’t say “Cuando” (remember your Lonelyplanet phrase-book level Spanish) just use their calculator. Each time I exchanged the money I used the split the difference strategy, and I was happy with the “fee/commission” I was being charged.


Jackie the quintessential border fixer


So for instance if 400 blue widgets are really worth 1100 red widgets and they are offering me 900 reds for my blues, I just said no, give me 1000, they pout, look at me with pleading eyes, I shake my head and repeat the same number, and the transaction is completed within a few seconds on a handshake to both our satisfaction.

We have found that the time of day (lunch time) did not influence the rapidity of the service we received from border officials. Everybody in an official position, without exception has been friendly and helpful.


Valentino was screwing around with the camera, nothing to do but wait...




What do you mean nothing to do but wait WTF!!!




Now for the useful tip section:

Before you leave home, or on the road when you have a chance, have plenty of copies made of your drivers licence front and back, your vehicle registration/title, and your passport (photo page).

Find out what the official fees for entry/exit are so you have an idea of the minimal currency you will need for entry. You could also opt to change a small amount of US dollars with the moneychangers into the local currency if you do not have sufficient money left from the previous country.

Lunch in Honduras




Making could use of the J&V stickers



And for a minimum of pontificating:

Just as Americans, Canadians are used to minimal entry procedures between both countries. It always makes me laugh when I hear people commenting or complaining about (now) needing a passport to cross the border between Canada and the US. Europeans have it even easier within the Schengen area. Pair that reality with the heat, the humidity, and the foreign language, and I can understand that the formalities may seem overwhelming for some.

In fact it is very reflective of our low context culture, as Westerners we are largely desensitized to context, and conduct our daily lives in sheep-like fashion, we are lost without signs and indications, we need at least four sometimes eight signals at one intersection, a green left/right arrow, and several lines and other delineations painted on the ground to tell us where to turn, all in the name of safety and order. Victoria, the city where I live is a prime example of that, there is an incredible amount of signage and generally speaking drivers are really bad.

In the rest of the world, with exceptions of course, the more you go East and South the more people rely on context to interact with their surroundings, hence they are used to make decision for themselves, and do not necessarily associate the systematic lack of information, and official conventions to be either a sign of chaos or a treat. As such they are able to navigate a busy roundabout several lanes wide or cross a busy intersection with a single signal indicating the right of way, they are used to dealing with animals on the road without signage indicating a deer crossing for the next 10km. There isn't a stop sign at every street corner...

The same concept apply to these border crossings, you have to rely on yourself to find your way in and out of a relatively easy maze. This warren will have little indications of where the exit is, and you will likely get lost and hit a dead end here and there. You will have to backtrack, although you might get scolded if you make a mistake, you will not get hurt nor loose your shirt.

Both Hall and Hofstede have studied this, and other related phenomena and behaviours that identify broad differences in cultural values and communication styles. Although general, these theories explain a lot about our cultural differences and why certain things happen the way they do i.e.: this thing with traffic, why some airliners crash, why cultures are easily offended, even irritated by the behaviours of others, regardless if they are visiting or visited. It is, to a certain extent related to emotional intelligence, capacity for apathy, awareness of self and others, notions of independence and interdependence.

What is interesting about all these cultural/communication behaviours, is that no matter how cliché many of them are, more often than none they are very reflective of a given group, society, country, culture...

This is not the same thing as a stereotype, where one says: "all Americans are..." As opposed to; when placed in this situation, and facing this decision, Italians are more likely to behave this way, compare to Chinese who are more likely to behave that way (when faced with the same decision/situation). This include things like uncertainty avoidance, low/high tolerance to ambiguity, face saving behaviour, individualism vs collectivism, femininity vs masculinity...

For anyone interested in sociology, communications, human behaviour... these concepts provide a lot of reasons/justifications as to why we are the way we are, and why for so many of us it is difficult to change a behaviour or habit.

Cultural dimension theory; there is even an app for it called "Cultural GPS"

The key factor in my mind is self-awareness and the will to relinquish control.

The ride through Honduras was really nice and shortly after we crossed into Nicaragua we saw lots of animals. Horses, pigs, cows, chicken, goats, you name it we saw them, a lot of them leisurely walking around.




Don't think this guy would pass "Air Care"






















It was also a lot of fun zigzaging around the potholes





The volcanoes and landscape were amazing, barely a cloud in sky.








Just WOW






Tonight we rest in Leon


__________________
FEAR ===> False Expectation About Reality. GSA08
Work is just the time you have to spend between rides.

The motorcycle chronicles of Jackie & Valentino
The Southern Episode

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Old 11-15-2013, 08:27 AM   #102
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Talking Hotel-Hostal-B&B list

This is the list where we have stayed so far. Once outside of the US we rarely paid more than $35.00-$40.00 per night, some as high as $65.00, others as low as $20.00. Remember these costs are for two people.

We would go back to all these places except maybe the hotel in Durango, it was kind of crappy and the service was pretty lousy.

The condo we stayed in Zipolite, Mx on the beach was $100.00 a night but we split this in two, as we still had a riding partner at this point and shared two bedroom.

The list includes our KM per each travel day so far. You can find all the places using Google. Except walk ins, all were booked through:

Hostel bookers

VRBO

Booking.com

Hostel World

And Trip Advisors to get an idea of the place from the review

I kept a detail list of gas cost, I will post that next

09/21
Travel lodge Centralia WA, US 429km

09/22
Villa West Florence OR, US
398km

09/23
Elk Prairie camp ground, Redwood nat prk CA, US
288km

09/24
Travellers Inn, San Carlos CA, US
469km

09/25
Friend, Santa Monica CA
584km

09/26
Friend, Glendora CA
70km

10/01
Friend, Maricopa, AZ
628km

10/02
Hotel Piñon, Neuvo Casas Grandes, Chihuahua, MX
574km

10/03
Plaza Mexicana, Creel, CH, MX
408km

10/04
Hotel Acosta, Hidalgo Del Parral, CH, MX
400km

10/05
Hotel Rincon Real Suites, Durango, DGO, MX
416km

10/07
Hostal Villa Colonial, Zacatecas, ZCT, MX
294km

10/09
Hotel Guadalajara
San Miguel Potosi, MX
182km

10/10
Guanajuato,MX
Casa Mexicana,
208km

10/12
San Miguel de Allende, MX
Hotel San Ramon (5 ms outside of town)
88km

10/15
Morelia, MX
Casa Castillo
208km

10/17
Mexico City, MX
Hotel Cathedral
332km

10/19
Puebla, MX
Hostal Santo Domingo
126km

10/22
Oaxaca, MX
El Quijote
175km

10/28
Zipolite, MX
Monarcha
190km

10/29
Tuxtla Guiterrez,MX
Hotel del Carmen
502km

11/01
Palenque, MX
Yaxkin
270 kn

11/03
Flores, GT
Chahunta
412km

11/03
Santa Cruz Verapaz, GT
Park Hotel
302km

11/07
Antigua, GT
Casa rustica
143km

11/08
Playa Tunco, Sal
Layback hostal
403km

11/10
San Salvadore, Sal
Hostal Dona Marta
35km

11/12
San Miguel, Sal
Villas San Miguel
136km
__________________
FEAR ===> False Expectation About Reality. GSA08
Work is just the time you have to spend between rides.

The motorcycle chronicles of Jackie & Valentino
The Southern Episode

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Old 11-15-2013, 10:44 AM   #103
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About post #101: I just read the most insightful and beautiful piece of RR ever here in advrider. Thank you. It's nice to realize some of us can really enjoy the diversity!!!

Keep going, brother and sister. Right now I'm just wanting to be your host here in northeast Brasil...

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Old 11-15-2013, 01:49 PM   #104
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arjones View Post
About post #101: I just read the most insightful and beautiful piece of RR ever here in advrider. Thank you. It's nice to realize some of us can really enjoy the diversity!!!

arjones,

In fact a little goes a long way. I really believe that self awareness and listening are key to communication, and the gateway to cultural understanding.

So much of the time we are clueless about our actions, say things that don't mean much, and don't really listen to what the "other" might have to say.


Quote:
Originally Posted by arjones View Post
Keep going, brother and sister. Right now I'm just wanting to be your host here in northeast Brasil...
We are planning on doing a "loop" to Brazil from Buenos Aires, time permitting, when we make our way north from Tierra Del Fuego to Buenos Aires.

If not we might just have to fly down and visit some other time; I subscribe to the marry-me fly-free program

Thanks for tagging along

Really think about what you want to say, so you may say what you really think
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FEAR ===> False Expectation About Reality. GSA08
Work is just the time you have to spend between rides.

The motorcycle chronicles of Jackie & Valentino
The Southern Episode
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Old 11-16-2013, 07:17 PM   #105
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Laugh Gas



Here are our gas stats

Port Angeles, WA , US
21/09
20.00 - 92 oct @ 4.079 per Gal
49219

Centralia, WA, US
22/09
19.96 - 92 oct @ 3.959 per Gal
49768

Florence, OR, US
23/09
27.15 - 92 oct @ 3.719 per Gal

Eureka, CA, US
24/09
32.40 - 91 oct @ 4.399 per Gal

Point Reyes CA, US
24/09
32.30 - 91 oct @ 4.569 per gal
50563

San Miguel CA, US
25/09
29.46 - 91 oct @ 4.559 per gal
50807

Glendora CA, US
28/09
29.17 - 91 oct @ 4.139 per gal
51082

Tom Wells AZ, US
01/10
26.83 - 91 oct @ 3.899 per gal
51342

Maricopa AZ, US
01/10
16.60 - 91 oct @ 3.519 per gal
51512m

Douglas AZ, US
02/10
20.19 - 91 oct @ 3.779 per gal
51720

Nuevos Casas Grandes, MX
03/10
161.30 - 92 oct @ 12.36p per lt
51861

Creel CH MX, MX
03/10
230.19 - 92 oct @ 12.36p per lt
52116

Hidalgo Del Parral, MX
06/10
302.00 - 91 oct @ 12.47p per lt
52371

Durango, MX
07/10
265.07 - 92 oct @ 12.47 per lt
52624

Santania, MX
09/10
295.10 - 92 oct @ 12.47 per lt
52888

San Miguel De Allende, MX
13/10
288..28 - 92 oct @ 12.48 per lt
53119

Huajumbaro, MX
16/10
269.49 - 92 oct @ 12.47 per lt
53338

Tihuacan, MX
20/10
318.61 - 92 oct @ 12.47 per lt
53639

San Augustine de la Mecca, MX
23/10
371.95 - 92 oct @ 12.47 per lt
53932

Salina Cruz, MX
29/10
270.34 - 92 oct @ 12.47 per lt
54157

Tuxtla Guiterrez, MX
30/10
235.58 - 92 oct 12.47 per lt
54452

Palenque, MX
30/10
200.92 - 92 oct 12.47 per lt
54519

Tenosique last, MX Gaz
01/11
72.44 -92 oct 12.47 per lt
54575

Flores GT
03/11
175 - 88 oct 36.43 qtz per gal

Coban, GT
03/11
150- 88 oct 36.43 per gal

Ciudad Vieja, GT
08/11
130 - 95 oct 32.89 per gal
55118

Metalillo, Sal
08/11
15.78 - oct 97 @ 4.09 usd per gal
55298

San Miguel, Sal
12/11
14.50 - oct 97 @ 4.08 per gal
55461

Granada, Nic
15/11
756.70 - oct 95 @ 30.25 Dro per lt
55742

After 6523 miles or 10437 km..................... "we are still married says Jackie ;

What did you expect, you want the total cost, you figure it out…. The first number before “- oct” is the cost of that fill in local currency .

Spending the night in Granada, Nicaragua.

We hooked up with Moto Mikey (you can follow his adventures at moto-mikey.com) right in the middle of the plaza, had not seem him since Creel, MX. Tomorrow we hang out and share tales from the road


__________________
FEAR ===> False Expectation About Reality. GSA08
Work is just the time you have to spend between rides.

The motorcycle chronicles of Jackie & Valentino
The Southern Episode

V@lentino screwed with this post 11-21-2013 at 07:43 PM
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