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Old 11-22-2013, 02:11 PM   #91
vintagespeed
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dang man! you'll be glad you had it pinned, i didn't and it's still not right. rest up, dont MOVE, and heal well.
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Old 11-22-2013, 02:36 PM   #92
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Wow. Just made it through the whole report and ending on a crash. This is better than cable TV

Hang in there brother Phil. The world needs you!

Speedy recovery and safe travels (however you travel next, that KLR looked like it needed some work )
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Old 11-22-2013, 02:54 PM   #93
Wump
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vintagespeed View Post
dang man! you'll be glad you had it pinned, i didn't and it's still not right. rest up, dont MOVE, and heal well.

Too true Vintagespeed!
I broke my right clavicle into a few pieces years ago (playing sports) and didn't have surgery for 7 months. A disaster.
This break, while thankfully only in two pieces, was still a "distal third" fracture (broken near the end), which are notorious for not healing. As soon as I saw it I knew surgery was needed. Very impressed when it happened only hours later!
Thanks for the well wishes!
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Old 11-22-2013, 03:01 PM   #94
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roadinator View Post
Wow. Just made it through the whole report and ending on a crash. This is better than cable TV

Hang in there brother Phil. The world needs you!

Speedy recovery and safe travels (however you travel next, that KLR looked like it needed some work )

Let's hope the trip doesn't end here, having too much fun

First look the bike should be repairable. But I haven't taken a close look yet, and have mild fears that the subframe might have taken a beating given the weight on the bike at the time. We'll see. They tell me I can leave the hospital finally tonight. So perhaps tomorrow I'll start on the bike repairs.
Cheers,

Phil
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Old 11-26-2013, 05:37 PM   #95
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Thumb Embracing The Sadness: The Aftermath of The Crash

A week ago everything changed.


It was a beautiful, sunny day. We'd had a late start because Phil wasn't feeling very well. The first fourteen kilometres of highway outside of Chalhuanca twist through the mountains, alongside cliffs and rivers.

View from the highway. Photo: Tom Brady

My heart nearly stopped when I came round the corner and saw the scene every motorcyclist hopes to never see. Phil's bike on its side with debris spread along the behind it, with Phil laying very still in the middle of the road meters further on.


A million thoughts flashed through my mind. I need to get there fast, I need to be careful, I don't know what made him crash, he's not moving, is he dead?


I didn't see the crash itself, Phil had taken off pretty quick, keeping up with Tom on his much lighter Suzuki DR650. I was cruising along behind with our new friend Jeremy, who raced motorcycles in France, and had spent some of the morning coaching me on taking corners with a smoother line.


I stopped on the side of the road, leaped off my bike and ran to Phil. His eyes were closed, but he was talking. Kelly had already picked herself up and was kneeling beside him. After establishing that he wasn't dead, I ran back to help Jeremy clear the road, and of course, as per our long standing agreement, to take a couple of pictures.

Seconds earlier Phil was laying on the road where he's standing in the picture.


Jugs after doing some acrobatics


SO close to 100,000km. We think Jugs went upside-down at some point.


Always wear your helmet. This could have been Phil's head! *TB

Everything happened pretty fast, and we were soon being driven to hospital by a couple of kind Peruvians. Jeremy stayed at the crash site with the bikes, Tom soon realised something had happened and came back. We were so fortunate to have Jeremy and Tom riding with us. They were superstars.

Phil and Kelly show off their matching hip wounds. Photo: Tom Brady

Tom stayed with the bikes while Jeremy rode into town to get me. By this time our Peruvian rescuers had driven back to the crash site, loaded Jugs into their truck, and taken it with them to Cusco. We can't thank them enough for their help.

Jugs gets a lift to Cusco. Photo: Tom Brady

Tom rushed ahead to make sure Phil's bike was unloaded alright, Phil and Kelly got on a bus, and Jeremy and I loaded all of the remnants from the crash onto our bikes (including Phil's topbox, the tent, Kelly's hoodie and other random items).


Our ride had moments of beauty but I was shaken, and it soon was dark.

Jeremy, his bike Smiley, and a beautiful sunset on a terrible day.

Luckily we had installed one of our Sena intercom units on Jeremy's helmet, and so at least I had someone to talk to for that long ride towards Cusco. Jeremy's calm, reassuring presence kept me sane.

Me and Jeremy, a few days after the crash

It was after sunset when Tom called me saying he had also just crashed.


My heart dropped. I should have told Phil to stay in bed that morning and I should never have encouraged Tom to ride ahead quickly and alone to Cusco. The self blame came on strong and hard.


Luckily Tom was okay, and his bike still ran. He handed the phone to the bus driver who was demanding money from him for the rock that ricocheted off Tom's bike into his bus. I explained to the driver that Tom would not be giving him any money, and that Tom would give him his Peruvian insurance details.

The rocks that caused Tom to crash. Photo: Tom Brady



Rock 1 - Suzi's Rim 0. Photo: Tom Brady


Tom, luckily, was completely unhurt, the same cannot be said for Suzi's sidebag.

It was at this point that Jeremy and I decided that riding in the dark for another 130 kilometers to Cusco was a terrible idea. The “highway” descended into dirt sections many times, and there were several places along the way where rocks had slid off the cliff into the road. Decision to stop at the next hospedaje made, it was an hour, and 60km later that we eventually found one. We drove very slowly and carefully for that hour!


After all was said and done, the next day I found myself in Cusco, with Phil in surgery for a broken collarbone, and our plans in tatters.


I was consumed by conflicting emotions. Depression, shock, sadness, relief, gratitude, worry, anger, fear...


I was so glad that Phil and Kelly were okay, but also angry at Phil for being so stupid. How could he drive so fast with Kelly on the back? Hadn't he learnt his lesson when he crashed with me on the back in Alaska? Could I trust him to make good decisions on the rest of the trip? Would he be more careful, wait until he is properly healed, make the right choices?


My faith in his ability to make good decisions and to look after himself and the people he is travelling with was lost.


I was also feeling very sorry for myself. I had wanted to be in Southern Chile with my friends for Christmas. Google tells me that recovery for broken ribs and collarbones takes 4-6 weeks meaning that it is very unlikely that we will have even left Bolivia by Christmas. Also I have been invited to sail to the Galapagos in February. This is an opportunity that I do not want to pass up. Before the crash, making it to Ushuaia in mid January was very feasible. Once again, making plans had created expectations that were now being crushed.


As the six days Phil was in hospital passed by, I slowly accepted that I may not make it to Ushuaia and be able to go sailing too. Kelly stayed in the extra bed in Phil's hospital room, leaving me alone to process everything – there were a lot of tears.


I questioned whether I even wanted to continue. This past week has been a bad one for our friends on the road. One of the Venezualan brothers we met in Lima was hit by a truck, ending his trip. The Australian couple who I met in a coffee shop in Solento (we will catch up on the blog and tell you all about the past couple of months soon) had their motorcycle stolen in Bariloche, Argentina. Seven volcanoes erupted around the world. We were lucky in comparison, Phil will heal and Jugs, while very beat up, still runs.


I moved into the Estrellita hostel, which is popular with motorcycle travellers.

A lot of kindred spirits

I met Greg and Cathy from France. Cathy is recovering from a crash where she shattered her shoulder. She didn't start riding again for 4 months. Even with that, much worse, injury, they didn't give up and go home, they stayed in South America, and now they are back on the road.

Cathy and Greg - her shoulder is recovering!

There is no way to know when Phil will be recovered enough to continue, or how much work it will take to get Jugs back on the road. I have been through a rollercoaster of emotions, and ended up deciding that I am just going to take things as they come. I would still like to see my friends in Chile, they are there until the 4th of January, but if I don't make it, that's okay.


I am still very much planning on embarking on my sailing adventure in February, and if that means I have to leave Cricket somewhere before we make it to Ushuaia, that's okay too. Life is an adventure, and stuff happens.


On Sunday, November 24th, 2013, Phil was discharged from hospital, Kelly flew back to Canada, Tom and Jeremy continued on their journey South to Bolivia and beyond, and we were adopted by Sandy and Sandra.

Final picture before the gang disbanded. We miss you guys!

In response to Phil's post about the crash, an old collage friend, Rob, sent Phil an email saying that his parents and two younger siblings live near Cusco. I soon received a call from his mother Sandra inviting us to come stay with them while Phil recovers and fixes his bike. They run an NGO called DESEA in the Sacred Valley.


Yesterday they drove into Cusco, loaded Phil and Jugs into their pick-up truck, and I followed them home on Cricket.

Jugs' second truck ride in a week


Our beautiful new home. Our bedroom is the balcony.

Once again, despite bad things happening, the world is looking after us. We really are extremely fortunate, and the overarching lesson I am taking away from the past week is to live in the moment. Be appreciative of the people around you, the generosity of friends and strangers, the support shown by everyone, the health, love and life that we all have. I'm trying not to worry about what's going to happen next. It's hasn't been easy, and I wouldn't wish this experience on anyone, but adventures aren't only filled with fun.


I am embracing the sadness, and I am confident that everything will work out in the end.

The Sacred Valley is a lovely place to recover.
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Old 11-26-2013, 10:38 PM   #96
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Happy your all ok

Nothin else matters but family and friends. Be safe & try to continue. I'll keep reading if you keep goin;^}
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Old 11-26-2013, 11:19 PM   #97
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All the best to you two siblings dealing with this setback.
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Old 11-27-2013, 04:52 AM   #98
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wump View Post
Let's hope the trip doesn't end here, having too much fun

First look the bike should be repairable. But I haven't taken a close look yet, and have mild fears that the subframe might have taken a beating given the weight on the bike at the time. We'll see. They tell me I can leave the hospital finally tonight. So perhaps tomorrow I'll start on the bike repairs.
Cheers,

Phil
One of the benefits of riding the KLR is cheap parts.Subframes are dirt cheap in the states.I dont know about getting the parts down there though.

PINWALL CYCLES
http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j...XuRhiGM7JJsw8A

This place has tons of KLR parts cheap.They have subframes for $25.00.
Maybe if you call them they would be willing to ship to you.

Anyway,good luck and hope you keep rolling soon.Your ride report is EPIC.
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Old 11-27-2013, 05:30 PM   #99
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Sorry to hear about the accident and hope all works out for you. Ushuaia will always be there!

I have nothing but good things to say about Pinwall Cycle.. bought few used parts from them for my Sportster so hope they can help you with your need. Good luck!
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Old 11-27-2013, 09:03 PM   #100
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Best Wishes

Glad you're alright. Stay positive. You are in our thoughts and prayers.
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Old 11-28-2013, 01:43 PM   #101
Blader54
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Sorry to hear about the accident! Get well soon, and from my own limited experience I may suggest not to "test" the healed part too early. I have done that and ended up prolonging my recovery, keeping me from getting back in the game as soon as I could have if I had just let my body complete the job.

Your disappointment at the likelihood of not being able to meet your friends at the end of the world is totally understandable and real. Somehow I believe that even if you miss the meet-up you will still enjoy the remainder of the trip, at least, that is what I hope happens. All the best to you both.
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Old 12-04-2013, 02:53 PM   #102
Wump
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Motorcycle Mecca and More: Medellin, Colombia

First off, thank you to all for the well wishes and kind messages we have received since my crash. I am out of hospital and healing in Pisaq, Peru. Ribs are sore, but the clavicle is better each day. Jugs is not doing so well with frame issues, but I have found a good mechanic who can un-break that which is broken. Now back to all that happened before the crash...



One of the great parts of motorcycle travel is the instant kinship you have instantly with anyone else also traveling by bike. It is through this kinship that in September we met Rusty (real name, I saw his passport). He saw our bikes pulled in at a truck-stop with a view for the night, and decided he'd stop too. Rusty had been travelling on his 1974 BMW for the past couple years. Nearing the end of his travels, Rusty was a wealth of information for us venturing forth, since he had been there and done that. We would travel together in a mini motorcycle gang to Medellin.

Teaching the youth of Colombia the magic of the truck stop jumping photo



Local kids adding a whole new spectrum to hitchhiking



Rusty's 1974 BMW "Black Betty"


Rusty rides Black Betty in the gang



Fantastic road through the mountains up to Medellin!


Medellin is a fantastic city. The altitude is just right to create weather that is “permanent spring”, a very welcome change from the roasting Cartagena and Monteria. Medellin has all the big city services (and motorcycle shops!) without really having a big city feel. There's plenty of ultimate frisbee, history (Pablo Escobar anyone?), cute shops (important to Kelly) and beer dispensaries (important to everyone). We spent our first night in “Casa Kiwi”, a hostel located in the more happening “Poblado” area that has a garage and preferential rates to moto travelers. Win win! Getting there wasn't without some snags though, more on that below in the Motorcycle Minute.
Nice as it was, Jayne, Kelly and I left Casa Kiwi after one night. We would return often though to hang out with Rusty and Tom (who rolled in a day later). From Casa Kiwi we moved in to a couch surf hosted by Michael and his Daughter. “Stay as long as you like” he said. Ok. We stayed a week!


We got to share in Luna's 4th birthday festivities!


Across the street and up two floors, a 21 year old girl drinks juice from a baby bottle. Alrighty.


Great neighborhood. Great neighbors. Including the one who helped us break in our first night when we were accidently locked out... with all eyes watching from nearby balconies.


... and house cages.


Medellin is a hotbed of Ultimate frisbee, giving us the chance to get our fix. Thanks to all the players who let us join in.

A rogue Blackfish jersey made it's way to Colombia. Makes me feel right at home! Amazing scenes!

When not frisbee-ing, we explored the town. One afternoon making a stop in at the Botanical gardens and seeing the fat statues. Apparently there is an amazing butterfly house at the botanical gardens, but they get tucked in to bed at 4pm, so we just missed them.

In our defense, the tire bush was quite captivating. Likely better than any butterflies anyways.


Five Jayne's and a Kelly. We did look at plants in the gardens as well, I swear.



We sat in the train for a break from all the plants. This got the kids hopes up that it might be about to drive away. We entertained them with our quality Spanish to make up for it.



Unfinished sculpture by lazy sculptor Botero



Botero Surfing


Downtown Medellin had many similarities to my last home, downtown Vancouver. Many highrises, art works here and there, many folks out and about, and drug addicts openly engaging in their trade sitting on the sidewalks. All big cities are the same. They really are.
Our next excursion involved public transit. We took the metro train to the metro ski gondola, minus the skiing. There was some mountain biking though.

It's a long way to the top, when you're on the metroooooo



Great view of the whole city, including the slums, from the metrocable gondola ride.



...so the metrocable ride is pretty long ok?


At the top of the Metrocable: "Parque Arví" with FREE mountain bike rental to go explore!



They were a little upset with us for riding off the "approved paved routes"


Back at home, Jayne has been doing much emailing back and forwards working on a project with Martin from Shelter Bay, Panama. Unreliable internet sent her into a tizzy when an important skype meeting that had been set up for days went awry. Minutes before the meeting, the internet cut out, forcing Jayne to run around to buy cell phone internet at the last minute. It's incredible how good wifi has become a “need” these days. Without it, we've fallen well behind on this blog. (Well in part, we've been having lots of fun too).
Without internet access and with things she still needed to do, Jayne was motivated to leave Medellin. It had been a week, she had itchy feet. For me however, I wanted to do a day ride and check out the nearby Guatape rock. I wasn't packed either, and had just hung up wet laundry. Jayne just wanted to leave. I did not. We had been here before.
This time Jayne took the option to head out on her own, in part I feel as a statement of point after not leaving on her own from Monteria. This was annoying for me, as I now found myself having to pack up anyways in order to give Jayne a bag to carry, but not with things I would need. With Kelly on board I didn't quite have enough space on the bike for all of my belongings and hers too.
Frustration in the air, tears were shed, Kelly and I set off one way to a rock and Jayne set off the other towards Manizales. Our first split of the trip.
Guatape is cottage country, with a big rock. A really big rock. ”Peñón de Guatapé” or "La piedra". A “monolith”, the 3rd largest in the world.

You might expect a fight over a covet-able rock such as this...

...and you would have your expectations met. The rock being near the border of two towns created dispute over who owned it: Guatepe or El Peñol. Guatape-ians decided to "settle" the matter once and for all using kindergarten logic: they would write their name on the rock. In 20 metre high letters. In white.
You might expect this would irritate the neighboring folks from El Peñol. You would have your expectations met once more. They watched in horror as a giant letter “G” was painted, then ran as a mob to put a stop to the madness. The towns people were successful in stopping the graffiti, but not before the “G” and down stroke of “U” were completed. That was 30 years ago. And that is how the rock still stands today.

Gee, I wonder who thought that was a good idea?


It's not the only changes the people of Guatepe made to the rock, but it is the only really negative one. They also built a staircase up a large crack in the side to allow tourists to walk up to the top.

740 stairs to be exact



That many stairs can be tiring...


...and/or require you to adjust your granny-knee-braces


But once you are at the top, you are treated to the claimed "greatest view in the world".

I guess it´s pretty good.


We´re happy with the view

The ride out to Guatape is quite nice, as was the ride home. Kelly and I stayed one more night at Mike and Luna´s before heading off the next morning to catch Jayne in Manizales, the beginning of coffee country. Rusty got sick and stayed behind, sure that we would meet again somewhere down the road.

Motorcycle Minute (or two, or three...)
Busy times for Jugs and Cricket here in Medellin.
I've noticed that I had been getting worse gas mileage over the last while. On arriving to Medellin, I found out why... when I "ran out of gas" just blocks before arriving at the hostel.

Colombian gas is too expensive to have leak all over the place!

Leaking gas from your petcock will tend to hurt you fuel efficiency.
In fact I hadn't run out of gas, I think gas running up the vacuum tube caused an inability to start up. Regardless I was able to get jugs running again and ride the 4 blocks further to the hostel. As luck would have it there was a Kawasaki dealer right down the street, and they could get me a new petcock “mañana”. I've been in latin America long enough to know that I was in for a solid few days of waiting. You can imagine my surprise of course when I showed up at Kawasaki the next day to find my brand new petcock waiting for me, and for just 65$; less than it would have cost me in Canada!

Holy petcock diaphragm batman!



Out with the old.



also used the disassembly to take the time to check my valves, thanks Rusty for the feeler gauge!





Next we would explore motorcycle paradise: 5-6 blocks of exclusively motorcycle shops and mechanics. If it's broken, someone here can fix it, find a new part, or build you one. Jayne changed her bald Avon Gripster to a new Metzler, while I scoped out new seat foam.

Cricket gets a new shoe


Seat magic at K-Lond

My seat was killing me. In the end I had my seat completely redone. New foam with a gel insert and new vinyl cover, and Jayne just went with the Gel insert. 160 000 pesos total for both, about 80$!
I would also get the divots in my worn rear brake pins welded full and lathed smooth on the spot for just 15$. Beats a couple hundred for a new brake assembly, never mind the shipping costs or the wait!


My previous "fix" with JB weld had failed, go figure.




Back in "el poblado" area, we stopped in at KTM for a gander. Some gander we got.


I´ll leave you with Jayne and Kelly at our favorite neighborhood coffee shop. Sure it´s not moto related, but it was nice.
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Old 12-05-2013, 10:07 AM   #103
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woot! new update!

hope you're able to breathe better after some healing time.

did you guys feel pretty safe in Medellin? i know you dont seem to find too much trouble, which is good, but i've read many stories of danger in that city.
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TAT-2013: http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=913898
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Old 12-05-2013, 10:20 AM   #104
Wump
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always safe

Quote:
Originally Posted by vintagespeed View Post
hope you're able to breathe better after some healing time.

did you guys feel pretty safe in Medellin? i know you dont seem to find too much trouble, which is good, but i've read many stories of danger in that city.
I never once felt unsafe in Medellin, not that I've felt very unsafe at all this trip really, but Medellin did not give me an uneasy vibe at all.
With every city, the locals know where it is potentially dangerous. Talk the the locals, and if they say not to go to a particular area at night we don't go there. That's it. That's all we do to keep safe. Talk to the locals.


Breathing well thanks! Just if I happen to sneeze that still makes me cringe a bit.
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Old 12-05-2013, 10:43 PM   #105
UltiJayne OP
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Cool2 A Brief Reunion: Manizales, Colombia

Deciding to split up from Phil and Kelly happened very quickly, but it had been building up for a while.


On my last morning in Medellin (2nd October 2013) the three of us were planning to go climb a big rock in a town outside of Medellin. Because it was out of town, and we'd been in Medellin for over a week, I thought it made sense to pack up, and head south after climbing the rock. I suggested this to Phil and his response was "I don't feel like packing my bike, let's just come back here and leave Medellin tomorrow".


I don't consider packing our sparse belongings any great ordeal, and after our time in Monteria, I was fed up of Phil's desires dictating everything we did and when we did it. Something inside me snapped, and I told him he could do whatever he wanted, I was going to head down into Colombia's famous coffee region.


I was furious, and very sad, as I packed my bags. I had always hoped it wouldn't come to us wanting to split up, but I had also promised myself not to stay with Phil just to keep the peace when I wasn't enjoying myself. He had Kelly with him therefore I didn't feel any guilt about heading a different direction. It's strange how I have no problem travelling on my own, but I don't like to leave Phil travelling by himself. Maybe because I'm his older sister and feel quite protective of him.


As I packed I decided that not only was I going to leave Medellin that morning, but I was going to choose a route through Colombia that I would enjoy, and Phil could come meet up with me whenever he was ready. He wanted to go to Bogota to meet some frisbee playing friends of friends, and everyone I had spoken to had only negative things to say about Bogota, so I decided to skip Bogota and the long ride there and back. Everyone I had spoken to had highly recommended the “Eje Cafetero”, the coffee region, which was on the way to Ecuador, and that is where I decided to spend my time.


I tearfully told Phil this, crying being an embarrassing side effect of being angry. I was so upset that I decided to skip the big rock and just head straight to Manizales. I didn't feel like hanging out with Phil that day.


The ride to Manizales was beautiful. Once I was on the road I started calming down and really enjoyed going at my own pace, with music playing through my Sena headset.


I found the Mountain House hostel, and they let me park in their garage/restaurant. I had an eight bed dorm to myself. (A nice change to the thin mattress on the floor I'd been sleeping on for the past week!) I spent the evening doing sink laundry and chatting with other guests in the hostel. We haven't stayed in many hostels, but I always enjoy meeting other travellers and hearing about their journeys.


The next morning I woke up to rain. I booked a coffee tour for the next day when Phil and Kelly would join me and I settled into the lounge area, enjoying the unlimited free coffee and good wifi connection.

This man had some kittens, in a bag. He tried to sell us one.

Kelly and Phil arrived late in the afternoon, and we headed out into town for dinner. Since Kelly joined us there there has often been some amount of conflict at meal time. Phil is looking for a large amount of food at the lowest possible price. Kelly wants nice, good quality food, served in a pleasant environment, and is willing to pay more for it. I fit somewhere in the middle.
I don't mind eating cheap set menus, they are usually quite edible, and sometimes even very good. But I also enjoy eating more “gourmet” food, and I do not have a requirement for a huge plate of food like Phil does. That evening Phil “lost” the argument, and we went to a nice Italian restaurant. We stopped at a grocery store and Phil cooked himself a second dinner when we got back to the hostel.

Not shown, the unpleasant smell of 3 damp motorcycle travellers

The next day we were up early for the coffee tour at Hacienda Venecia. They picked us up from the hostel and drove us to the plantation, where we were given a full history of coffee, and sorted, peeled, then roasted our own little piles of coffee beans. The man running the tour gave me a look of death when I asked for sugar. Oops.

Learning where different coffee comes from


Phil finds a new place to tie his wristband



All the possible flavours in your coffee


Kelly sorts her beans


Kelly sampling our freshly sorted and roasted coffee


The red bean is how it grows, we sucked the sweet pulp off the bean, which is then dried, once dried one peels the shell off, and then it is roasted.

The talk was nearly finished when an English-speaking guy and his Colombian girlfriend showed up. The leader asked Phil to explain what they'd missed. Phil rose to the challenge, and did a better job at explaining it all than the “professional”.

Coffee Guide Phil


Phil enjoys the roasting aromas

After another cup of coffee, our guide took us on a tour of the plantation. The tour up to this point had been very interesting and well structured. All that ended when we left our classroom. We followed the guide in silence as he walked us up to the processing plant.

Coffee beans growing


Watching the coffee beans dry


Phil feels the heat of the coffee bean driers.


Our guide filling a bag of coffee beans for export


Ready to be sealed and shipped

He didn't explain much about the fields or the plants. In the coffee bean washing, drying and bagging area he was only slightly more talkative, and then led us to the hacienda itself.

In case we forgot where we were...


Apparently they grow coffee and keep peacocks at the plantation


The Hacienda, or main plantation house


Phil chills in a hammock on the hacienda balcony

At this point we were left to wander around the old house, and enjoy the hummingbirds and oranges.

Flying in for a drink


Spot the hummingbird

We were very hungry as it was lunchtime, and had been told lunch would be available, but there was no sign of anywhere to procure this lunch.



There was a cooking class taking place in a kitchen, but it was not for us. It was disappointing to end what had started out as a good tour on a bit of a low note.

This butterfly loved the colour blue, and had a racing number on its wings!


Did I mention we were hungry?


In the jeep leaving the coffee plantation

We ate lunch as soon as we were dropped back at our hostel. That afternoon we were chatting on facebook to our Australian motorcycling friend Tom who we had met in Cartagena. He was nearby and he and I arranged to meet at the Santa Rosa hot springs the next day, while Phil and Kelly headed towards Bogota.


After a day of being reunited, the Ultimate Ride team split up again, this time for much longer.
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Arctic Circle to Patagonia - on the road - started July 25, 2012
www.ultimateride.ca

2007 Yamaha YBR125 with L plates! (UK)
2006 KLR650 (Canada)
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