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Old 01-06-2014, 04:40 AM   #961
tserts
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Are the WPs working today? I think the leaders should have come up by now...
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Old 01-06-2014, 04:41 AM   #962
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Quote:
Originally Posted by neduro View Post
One special, I was not able to follow the normal schedule, and pulled into gas with an urgent agenda. Unfortunately, it was close by a road, so it was absolutely packed with locals. I didn't have time for modesty, so some South Americans got a show. I know they cheered and clapped, which is pretty much the only time I've been applauded for that particular activity, and I hope it remains that way.
Good post Ned, could not have said it better myself however with reference to the above comment, let me share my story......

Special Stage emptying......After spending about an hour mid stage one day, battling through quad and moto dust, I finally made it past the hold up only to realise I was desperate for a number one! I tried to hold it off but it began to hurt to the point I was loosing concentration, that coupled with the fact I still had about 100km to go before fuel I decided I needed to go. Letting the other competitiors back past again and being stuck in their dust was not an option so.....and I did think about this long and hard.......I basically pissed myself!

Now, this wasn't easy, I discovered that I could not break the seal while I was 'on-it', it just would not go, so I had to ease eout of the gas on a straight and concentrate really hard to get her going. Once she was flowing I was able to get back on the gas and empty out at the same time. It was a major bonus!

Initially it was warm but then as it hit the air and began to evapourate I got some serious cooling benefits! The worst part was when the trickes reached my boots and I knew it would be there for some time :-(

Happy days.....happy memories

Dad was informed to power-wash the gear that night due to inforeseen circumstances

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Old 01-06-2014, 04:44 AM   #963
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Quote:
Originally Posted by neduro View Post
There have been a few questions about food, hydration, etc, and in the interest of procrastinating the work I should be doing, let me take a swing at answering.

I'll start by saying that the entry fee for Dakar is ~$20k, and in my opinion, that's a bargain. There is good, quality food waiting everywhere you want it (not easy to achieve!), and the level of support demonstrated with the iritrack/ sentinel system is amazing. This system allows the ASO to know precisely where you are moment by moment, and even allows voice communication and monitoring of your bike's attitude. So, if you stop to pee (like I did, others wear catheters) and forget to push the green button to let them know you are alright, it is an intentional stop, a french voice will shortly come over the intercom. "Mssr Suesse? Are you OK?". In addition, if the system senses a crash, or if the red button is pushed, medical personnel are automatically dispatched. My year, I think the average response time was about 7 minutes. That's better than it is at my home 8 blocks from a hospital, I am sure. Then, of course, there is all the work in making perfect roadbooks, finding great tracks, and the rest.

My point in beginning with this background is that the level of organization is several steps above any other event I have ever participated in, and they have certainly not skimped on the fundamental basics of keeping their athletes fed and hydrated.

The ASO maintains no fewer than 3 complete bivouac setups including kitchens and so on, and they leapfrog them forward so that you leave a fully staffed and set up bivouac, and arrive at the same. Each is near an airport, staff is flown mid-day while the crews and racers are on course- the same person checks you out in the morning and back in that evening. It is a finely tuned machine.


A shot of the food tent at the bivouac:

Now, food and hydration. My day started about 1 hour before my departure time for liasion. Since I typically finished upper-midpack, that was typically about an hour after the leader. They would often leave at 4:30 or so, I was more like 5:30 if I had to guess an average. So, I'd wake up and Deadly99 and I would head to breakfast together. This consisted of cereal, yoghurt, juice, coffee, tea, croissants (that varied in quality from decent to mediocre), toast, coldcuts, runny omelets, cheese, etc. There were plenty of calories available and plenty of variety, even if it wasn't always what you wanted exactly.


Breakfast with Chris Birch

This was one of my favorite times of the day. Some easy chatter, and you started to know the folks who a) were near the same speed as you and therefore eating at near the same time and b) spoke english (since I'm an ugly American who doesn't speak well in any other tongue). Chris and I ate with some regularity.

I'd head back to the truck and get dressed. I would have stocked my jacket the night before with water and Kate's bars (pretty much the most awesome travel food ever!). A big advantage of the Klim Rally jacket is that it can hold everything- tools, documents, food, water, etc. So, I'd just pull it on and head out.

Regarding fluids, I found that the key was more electrolyte balance than pure hydration intake. However, experimenting before the race revealed that all of the mixes that you can put in your camelbak water, made me nauseous. So, I used a ton of Hammer Electrolyte products- the pills, the fizz tablets around camp, and the recovery drinks when I finished the day. On the bike, I drank water.

On the liaison, there were gas stops as necessary, and the ASO would distribute water bottles there. At the DSS (and ASS), the ASO would have water. Any stop during the stage would have water. Typically, I drank a bottle of water every time there was one available, and my camelbak bladder would last the whole day, just occasionally sipping when I wanted to clean the dust out of my mouth.

At every opportunity, I also ate something, whether I was hungry or not. DSS was always a Kate's bar. Gas stops were either another Kate's or Clif Bloks or etc. ASS I would usually just try to get back to the bivvy unless it was a long liaison, in which case I'd have another Kate's.

As for unloading all of this intake, the race is so long that I never felt bad about spending a few minutes here or there keeping myself comfortable. I stopped to pee on stage if necessary (and always tried at the DSS/ ASS/ Fuel/ etc), and I would generally avail myself of the crappers at the bivouac. Hot tip: steal plenty of paper from the person guarding it (yes, really) and if possible, use the ladies rooms.



One special, I was not able to follow the normal schedule, and pulled into gas with an urgent agenda. Unfortunately, it was close by a road, so it was absolutely packed with locals. I didn't have time for modesty, so some South Americans got a show. I know they cheered and clapped, which is pretty much the only time I've been applauded for that particular activity, and I hope it remains that way.

When I'd arrive at the truck, I'd drink a recovery drink and chat with Tim about the bike. Then Deadly and I would go for first dinner, I'd do my roadbook, restock my jacket, and then we'd go have second dinner. Somewhere in there, I'd call Rally Raidio (I really miss that this year!) and then I'd go to sleep. It's a short list of things to spend time on at Dakar- your body, your bike, your roadbook, that's about it.

Great Info Neduro
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Old 01-06-2014, 04:44 AM   #964
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C'est le Dakar...

You piss on yourself and enjoy it!
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Old 01-06-2014, 04:45 AM   #965
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Ok I'm lost
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Old 01-06-2014, 04:46 AM   #966
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Myway View Post
Last year i made a list in my favorites
also for malle moto
2013
Code:
 
 http://www.trackingdakar.nl/index.php?track=48,67,69,85,93,98,105,107,122,127,132,143,147,175
  
.
so i made a new tab page and took the favorit

also in 2012
I have ADV link Malle moto Kawasaki Ladies

Code:

http://trackingdakar.com/index.php?stage=5&type=M&stand=S&country=*&track=87,157,164,174,185

http://trackingdakar.nl/index.php?stage=2&type=M&stand=S&country=USA&track=45,78


.
Maybe the browser behaves differently now? I didn't change that part of the code. I will try to work on that these days, but I can't make promises yet. First priority is to keep the site up and running :) If you have lists I can add them too so you can filter the specific lists. I tried to make a Malle Moto list already, but I'm not sure if it's complete. To be continued...
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Old 01-06-2014, 04:48 AM   #967
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Not a good day for fimtp yesterday, here is what Frederic's blog reports:

"Un réveil matinal, 4:00, pour Frédéric, puisque les motos et les quads sont les premiers à partir pour cette première étape. Elle relie Rosario à San Luis, compte 809 km dont 629 km de liaison et 180 de spéciale.
Message laissé par Frédéric sur mon téléphone cette nuit :
"Journée très mauvaise, j’ai fait la 1ère liaison avec Yannick, tout s’est bien passé, après il a pris la spéciale plus tôt que moi et après, j’ai pris le départ.
Au bout de 80 km mon moteur coupait encore. Un moteur qui coupe dans la spéciale sur une piste complètement défoncée, c’était un peu difficile, je me suis battu contre la moto, j’ai finalement changé le fameux capteur d’allumage, j’ai roulé 20 km - même pas, et puis ça a recommencé. J’ai changé la bobine, j’ai changé l’antiparasite, j’ai roulé 5 km et puis ça a recommencé et puis finalement j’ai eu l’idée que mon problème venait peut-être du robinet d’essence, parce que le filtre à essence n’était pas très plein donc j’ai bricolé pour éviter de passer par le robinet d’essence et puis là un pied total, ça marchait nickel.

J’ai fait 40 km super fort en fait le robinet était la cause de tous mes problèmes depuis le début et puis comme j’ai perdu beaucoup de temps, je me suis fait rattraper par les camions et puis dans une montée un peu difficile, il y a un camion qui n’a pas mis sentinelle, donc qui ne m’a pas averti qu’il arrivait, donc ça m’a surpris et je me suis couché sur le côté et juste derrière, à 50 m derrière le 1er camion, il y avait un autre camion et lui ne s’est pas écarté et a roulé sur ma moto, il a vraiment tout détruit, la navigation à l’avant déconne, j’ai le guidon de travers, la béquille tordue, les 2 réservoirs arrières enfoncés, le carter d’allumage cassé, je l’ai réparé, ça pissait l’huile, le sabot réserve d’eau qui fuit, la selle a été arrachée, il n’y a rien qui marche. Finalement, j’ai réussi à sortir de la spéciale quand même j’en un peu chié, bon voila , je vais au bivouac et bosser sur la moto toute la nuit, il faut que je vois ce que je peux faire pour repartir demain. Journée de merde, Dakar qui commence mal mais j’ai fini l’étape et je serai classé."

Translation:

An early wake up , 4:00 to Frederick, since motorcycles and ATVs are the first to go for this first step. It connects San Luis Rosario , in 809 km 629 km link and 180 special .
Message left by Frédéric on my phone last night :
" Very bad day , I made the first connection with Yannick , everything went well, after he took special earlier than me and after I took the start.
After 80 km my engine started cutting out. An engine that cuts in a rough track and you are in trouble , it was a bit difficult , I fought against the bike , I finally changed the famous ignition sensor , I drove 20 km - even , and then it happened again . I changed the coil, I changed the suppressor , I drove 5 km and then it happened again and then finally I got the idea that my problem may be coming from the fuel petcock because the fuel filter was not very full so I tinkered to avoid going through the fuel valve and then I hads an awesome time, it worked great.

I did 40 km super strong, the petcock was actually the cause of all my problems from the beginning and since I lost a lot of time, I got caught up by trucks and then in a somewhat technical up hill climb, there is a truck that has not used its sentinel , so that I was not warned that he was coming, so it surprised me and I was lying on the side and behind , 50 m behind the first truck, there was another truck and it did not avoid me and rolled on my bike , it really destroyed everything , navigation tower and instrumetns , I'm riding through the bend handlebar, 2 rear tanks crushed, made a hole in the ignition cover, I repaired it was leaking oil, shoe store water leaking saddle was torn , there is nothing that works. Eventually I managed to get the special anyway I just shit, here is good , I go to camp and work on the bike all night, I must see what I can do to leave tomorrow . Shitty day , Dakar bad start but I finished the stage and I will be classified. "

Kudos to him for finishing the stage, I hope he can recover from such a bad start but in Malle moto, it will probably be hard to get out of the snowball effect.
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Old 01-06-2014, 04:49 AM   #968
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Cool post Ned, Great insight. Loved it. Best post of the thread, So far!!!
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Old 01-06-2014, 04:51 AM   #969
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Originally Posted by Tau Anvil View Post
Awesome thx. So if you come in late you get the sequence messed up badly.
Exactly. Come in late, you miss nutrition, hydration, maintenance, roadbook quality time, etc. You get less sleep, you get less to eat, and you leave when you'll be in more dust, on a more torn up track, and get caught by the cars sooner.

Toby Younger is my hero- he made that race as hard as it could be made and still grinned every time I saw him.

The easiest Dakars are for the guys like me that rode fast-ish but not actually fast. The guys at the front have the wear and tear of wanting it every foot and holding it wide all the time. The guys in back never get a break.

While I'm holding forth on my favorite subject in the world, a few notes on pace. IMO, the most dangerous riders in Dakar are the 10th-35th place guys, who all think they should be up front, and take chances to try to get there. The guys who actually are up front belong there, and the guys in ~40th-100th have most of the skills but probably a little more self-control. Some of the 100th and back guys are going to suffer amazingly and persevere regardless, and to me, that's a very beautiful thing too.

The top riders are on the same pace all over the world. Kurt was fast here, he was fast in Dakar. Same with Jonah, Quinn, Chris B, etc. The middle of the pack is more varied. There are guys with amazing skills (Chris Birch comes to mind) who struggle a little with the raw speed of the event, and guys with somewhat more mediocre skills who thrive on it- so you wind up with a crazy mixture of folks riding near each other, some of whom thrive when it gets nasty, some of whom thrive when it gets straight and pinned, but who nevertheless finish near each other on net time.

My eyes are on Mike Johnson. He's a super nice guy, legitimately fast, I think he had a bad day yesterday but I don't think they'll all be bad for him, he's got the pace to run quite a bit further forward.

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Old 01-06-2014, 04:51 AM   #970
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Originally Posted by Deadly99 View Post
Good morning.

Garfrey...my guess is he got to bivy about 5+- hours ago. He will be running on adrenaline today

/snip/
Thanks, Ted, that would be consistent with my best guess, too, and that'd leave fimp with precious little time to take care of the necessaries and get any sort of rest. I hope he started with a humongous adrenaline tank!
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Old 01-06-2014, 04:51 AM   #971
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ok - home from work and all plugged in but ???? - should have started the special 50mins ago and be through wp 1 by now, do we have an issue again?
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Old 01-06-2014, 04:51 AM   #972
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This thread brought me out of the lurking closet... love the Dakar and loving following it with you guys!

We should be expecting them through the first WP anytime now, right?
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Old 01-06-2014, 04:56 AM   #973
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Quote:
Originally Posted by neduro View Post
Exactly. Come in late, you miss nutrition, hydration, maintenance, roadbook quality time, etc. You get less sleep, you get less to eat, and you leave when you'll be in more dust, on a more torn up track, and get caught by the cars sooner.

Toby Younger is my hero- he made that race as hard as it could be made and still grinned every time I saw him.

The easiest Dakars are for the guys like me that rode fast-ish but not actually fast. The guys at the front have the wear and tear of wanting it every foot and holding it wide all the time. The guys in back never get a break.

While I'm holding forth on my favorite subject in the world, a few notes on pace. IMO, the most dangerous riders in Dakar are the 10th-35th place guys, who all think they should be up front, and take chances to try to get there. The guys who actually are up front belong there, and the guys in ~40th-100th have most of the skills but probably a little more self-control. Some of the 100th and back guys are going to suffer amazingly and persevere regardless, and to me, that's a very beautiful thing too.

The top riders are on the same pace all over the world. Kurt was fast here, he was fast in Dakar. Same with Jonah, Quinn, Chris B, etc. The middle of the pack is more varied. There are guys with amazing skills (Chris Birch comes to mind) who struggle a little with the raw speed of the event, and guys with somewhat more mediocre skills who thrive on it- so you wind up with a crazy mixture of folks riding near each other, some of whom thrive when it gets nasty, some of whom thrive when it gets straight and pinned, but who nevertheless finish near each other on net time.

My eyes are on Mike Johnson. He's a super nice guy, legitimately fast, I think he had a bad day yesterday but I don't think they'll all be bad for him, he's got the pace to run quite a bit further forward.

Chris B and Riaan van Nikerk are the same. Both have top 3 Romaniacs finishes and Roof of Arica (birch has won it twice), but they are very steady riders and won't take chances. They also never break a bike very mechanically sensitive on the machinery.

Thx for the insight. Poor fimp
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Old 01-06-2014, 04:57 AM   #974
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(quote not working)

@ gagnaou -
Oh, Wow!
From the sound of it it could only have been worse if the trucks ran over Fred! Shitty day is an understatement.
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Old 01-06-2014, 04:57 AM   #975
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So let me get this straight - Frederic replaced three different electrical components, finally figured out it was fuel related and fixed the problem, then had his bike ran over by a truck, then finished the stage 5 hours later, then worked on his bike AND still found time to update his blog? Holy crap, talk about determination!
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