ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Riding > Ride reports
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 01-10-2014, 09:33 AM   #91
vintagespeed
fNg
 
vintagespeed's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2011
Location: Rancho Cucamonger, CA
Oddometer: 1,548
Quote:
Originally Posted by d_mob View Post
...


PS... I fell in love last night briefly, but the feeling wasn't mutual. More to come on that as well. :)
really enjoying your RR man, admirable the work you do with the kids and sharing your experiences. good stuff!

and if that beauty above is the one you fell for.......well, you're doing alright i think!
__________________
'12 Triumph ST3R corner raper (sold, sadly), '09 HusaBerg FE570 (also sold) and a bunch of 2 strokes that you dont want to read about. :)

TAT-2013: http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=913898
SoCal_NoDak-2012: http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=829203
vintagespeed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2014, 03:34 PM   #92
d_mob OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
d_mob's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2008
Location: Denver, CO
Oddometer: 215
That's her amigo. Sara is from Mexico City, but after sharing a few drinks last night, unfortunately she had to leave to head home.

Perhaps another visit to DF is in order. :)
d_mob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2014, 09:20 PM   #93
vintagespeed
fNg
 
vintagespeed's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2011
Location: Rancho Cucamonger, CA
Oddometer: 1,548
If there's one thing I've learned from reading about rides like yours, it's that you just never know what's gonna happen. :)


-jb

Posted with TapaTalk on i5
__________________
'12 Triumph ST3R corner raper (sold, sadly), '09 HusaBerg FE570 (also sold) and a bunch of 2 strokes that you dont want to read about. :)

TAT-2013: http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=913898
SoCal_NoDak-2012: http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=829203
vintagespeed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2014, 08:08 PM   #94
FargAT
Gnarly Adventurer
 
FargAT's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2010
Location: Fargo, ND
Oddometer: 124
Fantastic RR! Keep it coming & stay safe!


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
FargAT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2014, 07:51 AM   #95
d_mob OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
d_mob's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2008
Location: Denver, CO
Oddometer: 215
Vivo Escondido!!!



I awoke this morning feeling a bit melancholic. Nothing wrong, but it's my last day here in Escondido and I've realized that my travels through Mexico are soon coming to an end. The first thing I did after rolling out of bed was turn on this song by Deer Tick. The lyrics are fitting - "I can't sleep, I can't close my eyes... Blink one second, the whole world pass you by..."



It really has been great here, and I didn't expect to love it so much. I thought my new travel partner/friend Daniel (met him in Oaxaca) and I would pass through for a party, and quickly move on to Mazunte (another smaller beach farther south). Well, I ended up developing pretty solid friendships with two other guys. The four of us, Daniel, Walter, Martin, and I were a four amigos of sorts. We spent our days lounging on the beach, and nights dancing salsa, sampling mezcal, and testing our broken Spanish on several beautiful girls that we met along the way. I also met a really special girl the first night and we got along fairly well. Alas, she had to head back to Mexico City after a couple of nights, so our days together were short lived. Ahh, c'est la vie... I'll think of Sarah often.



One thing happened along the way that was a little less positive. I've come to the realization that it's difficult for me to keep in touch with friends and family back home. Aside from brief text messages here and there, real contact has become few and far between. Don't get me wrong, I'm not blaming anyone or saying people should reach out more, and I'm equally guilty of it. It's just hard to imagine how it will look six or seven months from now. Several long term travel books that I read talked about this being a difficult realization. I was a day late with birthday wishes to my father a few days back and felt horrible (SORRY POPS!!!). Because of that mistake, and the realization, I'm definitely going to make more of a concerted effort to stay in touch with friends and family back home. At the end of the day, that's most important I feel. On a positive note, one reason I'm on this trip is to make great new friends along the way, something that has certainly flourished so far. I'm looking forward to more...



Daniel and I are headed to grab some breakfast, then we're off to Mazunte. He is hopping a bus and I'll take the short, sweaty ride south on the bike. We're thinking of checking out a place called Posada del Arquitecto for a few days of relaxation on the tranquil beaches in/around Mazunte. After that, it's off to San Cristobal de las Casas (I think), then will start the crossing into Guatemala to begin the next chapter of the trip. I'm thinking of studying for a bit in either Antigua, or one of several smaller cities I've heard about. My Spanish is getting better, but it is still fairly elementary I've realized.



A couple shouts to close... Graciela, you have AMAZING taste in music and your playlists have kept me smiling along the way. Teresa (TeeRee), thanks for the Spanish lessons, the amazing day on the beach, and our fun times together here in Escondido. Daniel, Walter, and Martin, thanks for hanging out and ripping up the city with me. Our jokes and laughs will last forever. Martin, I still think the French have a worse reputation that Americans! :)



That's it for now... Time to motivate. More to come sooner than later,

~ D







d_mob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-16-2014, 09:41 AM   #96
arlob
n00b
 
Joined: Oct 2013
Location: Verdi, NV
Oddometer: 6
Now I'm hooked!!!!

Damn you David!!! Spent the whole morning catching up on your adventure as I should be tending to my routine duties. Loving your updates and was impressed with your reference to Deer Tick,(I catch live shows when I can).
I live out west and have passes to three different Tahoe mountains with conditions either bony as can be or non-existent and no snow in the furthest outlook with temps in the mid 50's every day. Back on the bike again until the snow flies and will find a way to continue on through your Bike Trip Porn.
Stay safe my friend.
arlob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-17-2014, 06:48 AM   #97
BullShatter
Gnarly Adventurer
 
BullShatter's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2010
Location: Scottsdale, AZ
Oddometer: 200
Vivo Escondido!!

D Mob,

Great to see that you found Vivo Escondido. The other owner, Ross, just left my house in Scottsdale on Tuesday morning with a new bike (F650GS) that he is riding back down to PE. Their new hostel has gotten great reviews on Trip Advisor and has since become the best hostel in PE.

For anyone else, Vivo Escondido is very rider friendly with secure parking for your bike, look'em up if your in the neighborhood.
__________________
"If God had wanted us to vote, He would have provided us with candidates."
BullShatter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-17-2014, 08:33 AM   #98
d_mob OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
d_mob's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2008
Location: Denver, CO
Oddometer: 215
Quote:
Originally Posted by BullShatter View Post
D Mob,

Great to see that you found Vivo Escondido. The other owner, Ross, just left my house in Scottsdale on Tuesday morning with a new bike (F650GS) that he is riding back down to PE. Their new hostel has gotten great reviews on Trip Advisor and has since become the best hostel in PE.

For anyone else, Vivo Escondido is very rider friendly with secure parking for your bike, look'em up if your in the neighborhood.
Yeah, I was sorry I missed Ross. Maybe I'll pass back through another time and meet him then. Regardless, the property was great, as was the staff, and other guests. Nothing but good things to say... Except maybe too much partying with everyone from the hostel.
d_mob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-17-2014, 10:25 AM   #99
d_mob OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
d_mob's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2008
Location: Denver, CO
Oddometer: 215
Magical Mazunte...



The ride south from Escondido to Mazunte was short, quick, but incredibly HOT!!! By the time I arrived I was covered in sweat. I checked into Posada del Arquitecto and booked two 'Estrellas' (hanging beds that overlook the ocean and sit under the stars). One for me and the other for Daniel, my temporary travel partner, but permanent new friend. He arrived by bus some time later that day. After dropping my bags, I ran to the shower, stripped down, and stood there under the cold water for what seemed like hours. I can't even describe how good that felt. I'd end up taking six or seven just like it during my time there.



As soon as I arrived in Mazunte I realized how different it was than other beach towns like Escondido. It is a small village that has a cozy feel and family vibe (everyone seems to know each other), filled to the brim with laid back, super cool, young hippies. There is also a compound filled with families that prefer to live and raise their families 'off the grid'. There is a 'one-with-the-earth', peaceful feeling that surrounds the place. Although everyone seems to do their fair share of partying (mostly 'organic' - I was offered mushrooms by the bracelet guy, and weed by the tattoo guy within minutes of arriving), I'd say there is much more healthy living that consumes most people's time. All around there are people giving/receiving Reiki, chanting, meditating, and the place is scattered with people semi-permanently fixed in various different yoga poses.



The first night Daniel and I explored the city a bit, then called it early. There was a five day festival going on, which brought people from all around to celebrate the saint of the village (the name escapes me). I guess the travels from the day, exploring the town a bit, and the preceding days/long nights in Escondido did a number on us. After a decent night I woke up early for a sunrise run on the beach, which was really magic. I tell ya, when the right song comes on at the right moment, sometimes life just feels right... almost too good. After my run and workout, I laid there on the empty beach next to a beach dog listening to music, thinking, and basking in the morning sun for a bit (this track a good example). Later that day we took the bike on a bit of a detour to La Ventanilla to do a short boat tour where we watched a massive crocodile devour a pelican. It was straight out of National Geographic. I felt like the croc deserved propina (a tip) for the show. Then we rode out to the point to watch the sunset. We were perched atop a rocky cliff with a group of hippies blowing conch shells and chanting. The sun set perfectly and then behind us a bright and beautiful full moon rose up to overpower the sky. It is hard to describe... I'm thirsty to take in more moments just like it.



That night we met a couple of British girls. Jo had just finished organizing an electronic music festival in Playa del Carmen. Apparently she is a bit of a big deal in the music scene. She met up with her friend who is a production manager for Bestival (another popular music festival in England). We partied it up for a bit in the plaza over buckets of mojitos, street food, and cold beer. It was the final night of the five day celebration, so the plaza was filled with a mass of people dancing and getting proper 'mega-spangled' (like that Jo? I was able to work in our new word). Those two were good fun and will be amazing music contacts to have in the future. I envy that they are both passionate about their work, but at the same time get to travel the world and do what they love. Sounds pretty spectacular.



Yesterday morning I woke up and packed. I had originally planned to spend a night in Salina Cruz at a surf camp, but got a wild hair over breakfast and figured I'd just book it all the way to San Cristobal, which would give me three nights there instead of two. The ride was long (360+ miles / 9hrs), but I'm really glad I did it. I experienced every bit of riding bliss along the way. The beginning of the route was filled with amazing twisty roads, sunshine, and endless beach views. The middle of the ride was flat road through beautiful wind turbine farms. Again, the right song at the right time had me playing air drums and dancing in the saddle. Throughout the ride the temperature dropped significantly. It started out around 87F and ended around 47F. The third part of the ride was incredibly exhilarating as I found myself darting quickly in and out of busy night traffic through the streets of Tuxtla Gutierrez. It is hard to keep up with the delivery guys on the little 125cc bikes, but I'm happy to say that I bolted through the city center in what had to have been record time. Only sideswiping one car with my pannier (oops!). The final bit of the ride was again filled with absolutely amazing twisty sections and then opened up into some nice smoothly paved high speed sweepers that led down into San Cristobal, which at that point was resting peacefully below a gorgeous yellow/grey full moon.



I checked into Rosso's Backpacker Hostel here in S.C. and was pleasantly surprised that not only did they have a perfect, secure courtyard for the bike, but they offered me a free night. Apparently Rosso loves motorbikes and if you arrive here on one, your first night is comped. After getting unpacked and showered, I met a few travelers in the courtyard and we explored a couple of restaurants/bars. Both had amazing live music and an uber cool crowd. The young people here remind me of the hipsters in Buenos Aires. Sharply dressed, confident, smart, and full of life. Since this is Chiapas, home of the Zapatista movement, there is a bit of a rebellious aura about them as well. The second bar had a great live salsa/cumbia band. I met Veronica straight away. She is a local that speaks zero English. My broken Spanish didn't help things, but we hit it off on the dance floor and danced sweaty salsa through the night. It was quite fun and she wants to meet up again tonight. I plan to explore the city today after finishing up some much needed chores (i.e. finances, e-mail, laundry, etc). I also need to buy an iPhone 5 charger as mine stopped working, which may be a challenge tracking down.



For those reading this, if you are on the fence about doing a trip like this. Seriously, fucking do it!!! Sorry for the language, but there is no other way to put it. Someday never comes... Along the way I've experienced life like I've never felt before. Some good (mostly all good), some bad. At times I've been lonely, at times surrounded by new friends. At times I'm at wits end (i.e. crashing the bike, being lost, etc), but the majority of the time I'm in a constant state of surreal elation. It really is an amazing feeling. During the ride yesterday I realized that this is a temporary journey, and made a point to really soak in the day.



I guess that's it for now... I'll write more from here in San Cristobal. After this I plan to make the trek to Antigua where I'll study Spanish and live with a host family for a week and begin the next chapter of the adventure in Guatemala and the remainder of Central America.

Until then, salud!!! ~ D

d_mob screwed with this post 01-18-2014 at 12:46 PM
d_mob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-17-2014, 04:35 PM   #100
BullShatter
Gnarly Adventurer
 
BullShatter's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2010
Location: Scottsdale, AZ
Oddometer: 200
Ride safely amigo!
__________________
"If God had wanted us to vote, He would have provided us with candidates."
BullShatter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-17-2014, 07:54 PM   #101
Tejas99
n00b
 
Joined: Sep 2013
Location: The Woodlands, TX
Oddometer: 3
This is fantastic....every bit of it!
Tejas99 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-18-2014, 11:51 AM   #102
d_mob OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
d_mob's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2008
Location: Denver, CO
Oddometer: 215
Quote:
Originally Posted by BullShatter View Post
Ride safely amigo!
I will for sure. I really didn't want to ride at night, but needed to get into San Cristobal. It was dumb, but I have to say one of the more exhilarating rides I've been on in some time. The close quarters with taxis, buses, cars, bikes, people, dogs, kids, etc, etc, etc... It reminded me of dipping into turn one while roadracing. Everything slows down and you become aware of everything around you. An interesting feeling.

I'll stay safe though. Thanks for the reminder.
d_mob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-18-2014, 11:54 AM   #103
d_mob OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
d_mob's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2008
Location: Denver, CO
Oddometer: 215
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tejas99 View Post
This is fantastic....every bit of it!
Glad you like.

Last night I went to an absolutely amazing underground gypsy dance party w/ some amazing live music and Zapatista art all over the walls. I ended up chatting with a guy who has some connections in one of the communities close to here. I was planning to ride out today, stay with his friend within the Zapatista community tonight to learn more about them and their way of living.

However, bike issue # 1 on the trip! I went to start the bike this morning and hear just clicks. The computer and lights come on, but when I press the starter, I just hear clicking. I have it charging now and am crossing my fingers that it's just a low battery. I did charge my phone on the bike yesterday without it turned on for quite some time.

I guess we'll see... If I get it started soon, it's off to Zapatista land. If not, then maybe I do a day trip there. Then down to Antigua...
d_mob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-2014, 04:35 PM   #104
d_mob OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
d_mob's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2008
Location: Denver, CO
Oddometer: 215
San Cristóbal, Zapatista Guerillas, & Border Crossings... Oh My!!!



Well it's official, chapter 3 of the journey has begun. I consider the 1st chapter my time traveling through the US, chapter 2 would be the month in Mexico, and now chapter 3 will be my travels through the remainder of Central America.



I was in San Cristóbal for several nights. I stayed at Rossco's Backpacker Hostel, which was perfect. Good folks, beautiful architecture and gardens, comfortable bed, cheap, and with secure bike parking. I mentioned this before, but if you show up on a bike, the first night is free. Like most places I've stayed, the hostel was filled with a very eclectic mix of travelers. There was representation from Denmark, Australia, England, Korea, Mexico, and several others. I ended up hanging out with a few people from the hostel and had a great time in the city. S.C. is beautiful. It was founded in 1528 and has beautiful streets, architecture, gardens, and churches. It is fairly large with a population of a little over 150k. The second night I was there, I met a guy at a cafe that invited me to an underground gypsy music party. The venue, crowd, art, and music were all incredible. While there, I noticed that the place was very Zapatista friendly (art on the walls, graffiti in the bathrooms, etc). I ended up chatting with a guy who spent some time living with a Zapatista community. He said that I may not be invited in, but gave me directions to Oventic, and several tips on how to act and react. I also met Nat (short for Natalie) at the hostel and invited her along for a day trip on the bike to visit the compound.



The next morning Nat and I agreed to meet at the main plaza in Chamula, which is a small village north of S.C. at 2pm. As planned, Nat strolled up and after taking in a few sights in the town (namely $hitfaced local dudes passed out everywhere - along with a beautiful plaza and church) we headed out on our adventure. The directions I was given ended up being slightly off. Nat and I ended up getting lost countless times in tiny little villages, and meandering up and down the mountain roads. We were about to give up and head back until we finally met a guy willing to give us exact directions. I get the impression that the locals aren't really supposed to give specific directions to Oventic.



We crested an eery fog-covered mountain and finally arrived to Oventic around 4pm. There was only one sign and a gate. The gate was guarded by two women with red bandanas covering their faces. I parked the bike and we walked up. I asked in Spanish if it was permitted for us to enter. She said possibly and then motioned over two guys who were milling about in the background. When they started coming towards us I realized they were wearing traditional Zapatista balaclavas and gear. There is something rather daunting about having masked/armed guerrillas marching towards you. They came up and asked, "why are you here?" I responded that we were there to study the murals, art, and culture. Also that we wanted to learn more about their way of living. Masked guerrilla # 1 then walked back to confer with masked guerrillas # 2 & 3. After about 20 minutes, masked guerrilla # 1 walked back over with a form and interviewed both of us about our intentions. He then asked for our passports and said they would hold them while we were inside the compound. Daunting feeling number two, watching as a masked guerrilla walks away with your passport leaving you locked outside the gate. Fortunately, I travel with an expired passport, but Nat brought her real one. She was a bit nervous about that. Long story short, after waiting for almost an hour, we were finally allowed into the community.



According to our 'guide', there are approximately 2,000 members that reside in/around Oventic. As you walk down the hill from the gate there are wooden communal houses that are long and slender on the right. On the left there are several places preparing food and a communal center. A little further down there is a church on the left, and a couple of judicial buildings on the right, one of which was a 'significant women of the community' meeting place. Down the hill at the bottom of the compound is the school. Like anywhere else, they have primary and secondary school, and there were children hiding about pointing at us suspiciously and laughing at the strange gringos. Everything, and I mean EVERYTHING is covered in beautiful painted murals. If you know me, you know I love street art, so I was in heaven. There are even a couple of original Banksy murals from time he spent with the community several years back. Of course there are tributes to the founder of the movement and several praising Che as well. Just as quick as we were led in, we were walked back up the hill and led out of the gate. Our passports were returned with a handshake and a "thanks for visiting and learning more about us". It really was a highlight of the trip thus far. I got to learn more about the EZLN and Zapatista culture than I ever thought possible. It seemed surreal that I was actually inside their community. It was a special day for sure.



Not including the US portion of the trip, I've now been on the road for over one month, and have clocked over 5,000 miles of travel. I've had one incident with a flat battery, and one tire puncture. I stopped at numerous amazing locations in Mexico ranging from snowcapped mountains, scrub and cactus covered desert, pristine coast, and colonial cities. I've watched countless amazing sunsets (only one sunrise unfortunately). I watched 'The Secret Life of Walter Mitty' in a theater in Morelia and realized how extraordinary it is that I'm already chasing down dreams of grand adventure (the theme of the movie). I've met a great deal of friends during my travels, and also several beautiful girls that caught my attention, one of which I can't seem to shake away the thought of. I've been scared, at times depressed and lonely, incredibly happy, excited, anxious, and everything in between. All that and I lust for more, more, more!



Today I began Spanish classes here in Antigua. I plan to study for 3 - 5 days depending on how the lessons move along. Today went very well, and even though my instructor Rosa speaks zero English, we were able to communicate just fine. I think I'll also take a short tour to see some lava one of the days (apparently you get so close you can roast marshmallows). I also met the owner of MotoTours (formerly CATours) today. Jose is a great guy, and really loves his bikes. He is a fan of roadracing as well, so we got along just fine. I had no idea racing was such a big deal in Guatemala. Anyway, Jose invited me for a ride, so I'll probably take him up on it while I'm here. He has a nice selection of 250's and 450's to rip around on. Check out his site here.



That's all for now. I'm meeting up with my first fellow ADV member tonight ('cmkaduce') for a drink. It will be great to swap tales from the road over a cold beer or two. After that I've been invited to a salsa night at a club nearby. I'm not very good at Spanish (for now), but it turns out being married to a Colombiana and the lessons have paid off. I'm pretty good at salsa. I love the reaction that I get from the local girls when they realize I'm one of the few gringos that can dance. Ahhhh, the universal language of dance. :)



Until next round...

~ D







d_mob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-2014, 08:25 PM   #105
COracer
Adventurer
 
COracer's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2011
Location: Co Lo Rado
Oddometer: 58
Incredible David, truly awesome experiences!
__________________
"I have discovered that even the mediocre can have adventures and even the fearful can achieve" - Edmund Hillary

KTM 690R Yamaha YZ450 sumo
COracer is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 01:53 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014