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Old 01-24-2014, 06:19 AM   #1396
1911fan
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Years ago I had a girlfriend with a daughter like that. Her bubble was maybe 50 feet forward, and not at all to either side. Scared me to teach her to drive, but her mom was even worse. She finally totalled the car by pulling right out in front of somebody who was speeding through a red light. That she saw coming, and somehow thought would manage to stop in 20 feet before the intersection.
For MONTHS, she denied any responsibility. Every time it came up, she'd say, "But I had the green light, and that lady was speeding!" and I would reply, "You knew this, and pulled right out in front of her anyway." and she'd say, "But I had the green light!"
And one day we have this conversation, and I say "And you pulled out in front of her anyway." and after about a 30-second pause, she says, "Yeah, I did, didn't I. That makes it my fault."
Don't know if her driving improved, because that whole family was fucked up in many ways. "Dysfunctional" would have been a major step up, but that's another story. I got the hell away from all of them shortly after that.


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Old 01-24-2014, 07:34 AM   #1397
geolpilot
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Good judgment comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgment.
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Old 01-24-2014, 07:42 AM   #1398
Kawasakirob
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Put as many miles as you possibly can on that bike. Experience Experience Experience
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Old 01-24-2014, 09:51 AM   #1399
PFFOG
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnCW View Post
...................
Sort of a chicken - egg situation. How do they get situational awareness without actual situations making real the need to have situational awareness. While that experience may be an expensive trip to the panel shop in a car, it may be the hospital or worse on a bike.

Dunno the answer.

I started teaching my kids SA as soon as they could see out the windows of a car. Put lots of miles on with them in the car, and instead of punch bug of find the license plate games, it was more like a game show, I would quiz, where did that car come from? What potential hazards do you see ahead? If I slowed down when I saw something, asking them what THEY saw?

Worked well, all grew up to be excellent riders/drivers. My middle son to this day amazes me with his ability to see deer along side the road. And his only accident in 16 years of driving was a minor slide off a slippery road, that only damaged his perfect record.
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Old 01-29-2014, 11:34 AM   #1400
LuciferMutt
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Originally Posted by geolpilot View Post
Experience comes from bad judgment.
Or bad luck. Or chance. Or...basically... life and anything that is out of your immediate control.
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Old 02-02-2014, 07:52 PM   #1401
BikeMan
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safest place to ride is where the cagers are not. the hills & twisties and or off road. cagers hate that kind of stuff. most mc accidents 90% happen at slow speeds. avoid slow speeds, city traffic, traffic jams, etc..
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Old 02-03-2014, 05:14 AM   #1402
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safest place to ride is where the cagers are not. the hills & twisties and or off road. cagers hate that kind of stuff. most mc accidents 90% happen at slow speeds. avoid slow speeds, city traffic, traffic jams, etc..
The UK study shows your information isn't just wrong, but laughable.
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Old 02-03-2014, 12:54 PM   #1403
Mile Maker
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Location: Southern Alberta, only 150 km to a curvy road
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Things i learned (mostly the hard way) in my first 5 years

Things i learned (mostly the hard way) in my first 5 years of riding.

ATGATT ( all the gear, all the time) because its not IF you crash, Its When you crash! At least when you ride in the dirt.

If you are headed to the dirt, Have good tires. Period. 90% street 10% dirt tires, are useless for the places you really want to go. Once the front end looses traction, you crash. Its cheaper to wear out some good tires, than it is to replace that plastic you just broke.

Air down your tires when riding the dirt. This will add traction, and confidence. But remember to air back up when you hit the black top again. I carry a small 12v air compressor

Set up your suspension properly. Most adventure bikes have an adjustment to set up rear suspension height. Its amazing how much a rear suspension adjustment will have on the handling and feel of the bike.

Cagers don't see bikes, they will look directly at a bike, and not see it. This is especially true at night. Bikes with only one headlight are hard to see, when surrounded by all the other lights in the city.
Add an aux headlight. use it as a daytime running light. It will help you be seen.

Always assume that you are not seen by cars. Stay out of blind spots. Leave yourself an exit strategy in every situation.
Don't be afraid to flash your brights at people that you suspect don't see you. This will grab their attention.
Also, flash your brake light a couple of times when you are compression braking, in order to grab the attention of the people behind you.

When riding solo, Ride near the center line. This is the best place to be seen by other traffic.

slow down for blind corners. They often hide pot holes, ruts, or some other obstacle that you wouldn't want to hit.
Only ride at a rate speed that you can stop in time to avoid a collision.

Don't listen to your iPod when driving. It will distract you. When you ride on dirt, or surrounded by cars, You have a lot of things to pay attention to already, You don't need music to distract you further.

Mile Maker screwed with this post 02-03-2014 at 01:19 PM
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Old 02-03-2014, 07:10 PM   #1404
DAKEZ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mile Maker View Post

When riding solo, Ride near the center line. This is the best place to be seen by other traffic.
Not when on a two lane highway it isn't. Being more to the fog line will help oncoming vehicles getting ready to pull out and pass a better chance of seeing you. (And give you a better chance of avoiding them if they don't)

One should NEVER adhere to ANY hard and fast rule about lane position when riding. Be fluid and be seen.
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Old 02-04-2014, 07:04 PM   #1405
BikeMikeAZ
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Armor All is not your friend

When I was 17, those tires looked GREAT on that 72 CB360. 10 minutes later, shorts, a t-shirt, and the guard rail bouncing off my helmet wasn't so great. Didn't break anything, but spent 3 hours in the tub with a scrub brush getting gravel out of my forearms and thighs. Before I could drink. Painful. At least Mr. Happy was unscathed.
I didn't read all 95 pages of posts, so sorry if this is a redo: your tires have only a given amount of traction 'budget' for any given situation. Use too much for turning, and you don't have enough for stopping, or vice versa.
The noob version of this might be 'Don't try to turn and stop at the same time'. Practice to determine how much turning and braking you can do.
Loads of other good stuff here. Thanks for letting me join the fun.
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Old 02-04-2014, 10:09 PM   #1406
Mile Maker
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DAKEZ View Post
Not when on a two lane highway it isn't. Being more to the fog line will help oncoming vehicles getting ready to pull out and pass a better chance of seeing you. (And give you a better chance of avoiding them if they don't)

One should NEVER adhere to ANY hard and fast rule about lane position when riding. Be fluid and be seen.

yes, i was referring to a double lane road, but failed to say that.

Riding on the line, in a double lane road allows you to be seen by mirrors of cars in front of you, and less likely to be missed by a shoulder check.

As like you said. Be where you can be seen.
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Old 02-05-2014, 03:26 AM   #1407
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The number one thing to remember; expect the unexpected!
I'm sure someone else mentioned this, it bears mentioning again and again. "Expect the unexpected". There ya go I just saved at least one persons life.
Also respect your lucky escapes, not everyone is so lucky.

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Old 02-06-2014, 03:34 PM   #1408
nukeNpuke
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Protect your protective gear.

Sorry if this was covered already i didnt see it by page 50 something. Dont ever let your helmet hit something. I use to pull in the garage and throw my helmet across the garage onto a chair, occasionally it would bounce off and hit the concrete. One day (early 90's) as always i pulled in and took of my helmet i threw it in the chair as always, and it bounced out, only to shatter on the ground. It was still intact, just spider cracked all over. Any head protection, hard hat, helmet, bump hat should be treated like eggs. If you drop it hard, you need to replace it. You cant see what all damage is already done, and one day you might need the 100% protection it has to offer. I climb cell towers for a living and i follow this same rule with my bump hat and hard hats. If i bump it on something hard or drop it its trash. No need for my son to have to deal with me being injured or killed because i ddint take care of my protective gear.

Always wear gloves, sliding across pavement barehanded will end your ride.

Dont show off, I dont care how sexy she is.

If it isnt up to par dont ride. that goes for you, your equipment and your ride.

Grow eyes in the back of your helmet. 17 years riding motorcross and dual sports and all my major wrecks were from behind me. Either a truck sliding into the back of my bike at a redlight or a rookie on the track landing on my back doing singles instead of doubles.
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Old 02-06-2014, 05:02 PM   #1409
Sidewise
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Old 02-09-2014, 05:05 PM   #1410
sailorninja
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As a noob to riding, I have a curious question. Is it normal that I am slightly unsettled by turning sharply? I've only been riding in the yard on my ninja. But it feels as though it is going to slide out from under me. Im still practicing just curious if the feeling will go away? :

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