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Old 01-25-2014, 02:53 PM   #16
JohnCW
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alcanfinforo View Post
I have a small fairing, luggage rack and a crash bar that I intend on using. The fairing is small but helps a lot, might invest in the National Cycles screen, its slightly taller.
And you might find wider at the base and sides. I've got a garage full of smaller headlight bolt on ones as I was trying not to destroy the naked look of my bike. After lots of expensive experiments I found the good old NC Deflector screen, same as I'd fitted to my 250 commuter, to work best.
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Old 01-26-2014, 11:13 AM   #17
Süsser Tod
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The bike is definitely up to the task, the countries you'd visit aren't...

Living in "Latin America" I wouldn't take such an old bike for that kind of trip, I know that getting parts for new bikes is a PITA, but it is twice as hard to find parts for older bikes. A newer bike will be more reliable and your chances of not needing spare parts during the trip will be much higher.

If you don't mind the risk, then go ahead, the bike will certainly do it.
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Old 01-26-2014, 05:59 PM   #18
Gripsteruser
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I did 6 weeks on a 1983 CB900F long ago. Great bike. Worked fine.
I even did some gravel roads (with great care and concern)



Learn your fuel consumption against the wind and be careful to get fuel when you can. Out West it can be a long way between fuel stops so if you're concerned SLOW DOWN to best range speed.

CB750 is a great bike.
Ensure it's in tip top shape, don't try doing dirt bike roads and go have fun.
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Old 01-27-2014, 10:05 AM   #19
buls4evr
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If you live in Michigan,USA you know the answer to this one! The road surfaces, even the paved ones, are so rough that you want that extra 2 in of travel that a DS bike provides. As road maintenance goes down the tubes in this economy the desire for a big DS bike will go up.
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Old 01-27-2014, 04:32 PM   #20
Golaiy
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You should be good for most of it. Maybe change the tires out to a more 50/50 tire (available at a lot of places) once you get further south. I had my previous Harleys in places that I was told they had no business being. But a bike is meant for the ride and that Honda can reliably go anywhere forever. (stubble fields on a CB just means slow down a bit)
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Old 01-27-2014, 05:16 PM   #21
Barnone
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Süsser Tod View Post
The bike is definitely up to the task, the countries you'd visit aren't...

Living in "Latin America" I wouldn't take such an old bike for that kind of trip, I know that getting parts for new bikes is a PITA, but it is twice as hard to find parts for older bikes. A newer bike will be more reliable and your chances of not needing spare parts during the trip will be much higher.
Susser Tod,
What bike would you recommend that would have the best chance of parts availability in "Latin America"?
In other words what do the locals ride? I rode a 1982 GL500 down to the Panama Canal in 1997 and it was plenty of bike. Luckily I did not need any parts other than a new battery in Guatemala.

A modern air cooled, chain drive, simple 250 cc bike would be fine with me.
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Old 01-28-2014, 03:31 AM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by buls4evr View Post
If you live in Michigan,USA you know the answer to this one! The road surfaces, even the paved ones, are so rough that you want that extra 2 in of travel that a DS bike provides. As road maintenance goes down the tubes in this economy the desire for a big DS bike will go up.
A very good point, IMHO. Bad roads, by whatever means (neglect, frost heaves, poor materials), are everywhere and another reason why I left the world of luxury barges for DS. Having that extra travel, coupled with improved handling, is one of the reasons why I found my GS to be more comfortable than the old road sofa, regardless of distance. Every rider in our family has moved to a GS (currently 3) or DS type of bike for their primary bike, even when touring.
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Old 01-28-2014, 04:24 AM   #23
rivercreep
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I haven't traveled by bike outside the U.S. but...

...my most enjoyable distance rides (200-600 miles in a day) have always taken place on the Dualsports I've owned. (from 250's to 650's)
Why, is because they're the only ones with a really stable geometry, 21 in fronts and the suspension to suck up Pennsylvania's shitty road conditions.

On Sportbikes, Cruisers and Standards, I've managed to blowout tires, bend rims and even blow out a suspension or two; none of which I would want to have happen abroad where parts availability might be an issue.

I learned my lesson. Any bike might be able to travel anywhere but, I'll always hedge my bets on a D.S. being able to do it better.

F.W.I.W. my definition of a D.S. is a true 50/50 bike like a DR650 (or comparable model) that forms a great starting point to take you in the direction you want to go.

Good luck on your Journey.
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Old 01-28-2014, 06:05 PM   #24
Alcanfinforo OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by buls4evr View Post
If you live in Michigan,USA you know the answer to this one! The road surfaces, even the paved ones, are so rough that you want that extra 2 in of travel that a DS bike provides. As road maintenance goes down the tubes in this economy the desire for a big DS bike will go up.
Unfortunately no, and my trip is heading out west from IL, then south until the road ends, then some more.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gripsteruser View Post
I did 6 weeks on a 1983 CB900F long ago. Great bike. Worked fine.
I even did some gravel roads (with great care and concern)

Learn your fuel consumption against the wind and be careful to get fuel when you can. Out West it can be a long way between fuel stops so if you're concerned SLOW DOWN to best range speed.

CB750 is a great bike.
Ensure it's in tip top shape, don't try doing dirt bike roads and go have fun.
My plan is to leave in October, so plenty of time to prepare. I'm guessing fuel consumption will lower once I have all the gear on. Tank holds 4.5 gallons. Slower rides and an extra 3 gallon tank I think should do the trick.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rivercreep View Post

On Sportbikes, Cruisers and Standards, I've managed to blowout tires, bend rims and even blow out a suspension or two; none of which I would want to have happen abroad where parts availability might be an issue.
Under what conditions? I've not ridden dual sports long distances, which is partly why I asked the original question. I don't plan to go off-road and most of the pictures of ride reports are 90% paved or hard packed dirt.
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Old 01-29-2014, 12:37 PM   #25
AviatorTroy
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Originally Posted by Alcanfinforo View Post
Thanks all for the vote of confidence, just wanted to make sure I wasn't missing something. I'll be sure to read the suggested trip reports. There is a lot of good, no, great information on here.

I've taken mine off road a bit too, and who says CB's can't have knobbies, right!!


This is why I asked, most pictures are on paved roads and a few on hard packed (what we call) "gravel" roads. Detours on washouts and that seem to be packed down enough from heavy traffic. Mud is just part of the adventure.

Yes, clutch cable broke on me once last year and I was 800 miles from home. Camped out for a day before a farmer stopped and helped. He had a spare cable for a smaller honda that we made work on mine. I ended up finishing the season on that cable.

I have a small fairing, luggage rack and a crash bar that I intend on using. The fairing is small but helps a lot, might invest in the National Cycles screen, its slightly taller.

One small hint, maybe you've heard this one, maybe not. I ride a lot of vintage bikes and in fact a couple vintage Hondas, and on a long road trip many people thread an extra clutch cable and throttle cable (the pull side) down through the stock routing and zip tie it to the good one. Then if you are in some god forsaken place and it snaps on you all you have to do is hook up the spare and you are rolling again.
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Old 01-29-2014, 11:21 PM   #26
hippiebrian
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AviatorTroy View Post
One small hint, maybe you've heard this one, maybe not. I ride a lot of vintage bikes and in fact a couple vintage Hondas, and on a long road trip many people thread an extra clutch cable and throttle cable (the pull side) down through the stock routing and zip tie it to the good one. Then if you are in some god forsaken place and it snaps on you all you have to do is hook up the spare and you are rolling again.
This.

Get a good tune up before you leave, sync the carbs, bring some extra tubes, get some good modern tires, put together a good tool kit, what ever other replacement parts you think might be necessary and split!

Have fun! Whatever bike you own is the best one to take! I've been on long rides on a cb-750 and they are rock solid reliable.

If people keep waiting for the right bike to do the trip, they sometimes don't do the trip. The fun in motorcycling, as I see it, is going with what you have and having fun on the way!
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Old 01-30-2014, 02:31 AM   #27
Aussijussi
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Friend did a trip around the world on a gold wing, which included Sahara and south America, so it can be done
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Old 01-30-2014, 05:54 PM   #28
SloMo228
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Quote:
Originally Posted by buls4evr View Post
If you live in Michigan,USA you know the answer to this one! The road surfaces, even the paved ones, are so rough that you want that extra 2 in of travel that a DS bike provides. As road maintenance goes down the tubes in this economy the desire for a big DS bike will go up.
+1. Around here, the single most comfortable vehicle I own is my DR350. It doesn't even have a great suspension compared to more expensive or more modern DS bikes, but it soaks up potholes, cracks, heaves, and bumps better than even my SUV did. Plus, it's way easier to dodge the potholes with a lightweight, agile bike and you have better visibility with a taller bike and more upright seating position.

That said, you can certainly ride just about any bike just about anywhere with enough skill, determination, and luck.
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Old 01-30-2014, 08:46 PM   #29
Alcanfinforo OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AviatorTroy View Post
One small hint, maybe you've heard this one, maybe not. I ride a lot of vintage bikes and in fact a couple vintage Hondas, and on a long road trip many people thread an extra clutch cable and throttle cable (the pull side) down through the stock routing and zip tie it to the good one. Then if you are in some god forsaken place and it snaps on you all you have to do is hook up the spare and you are rolling again.
Check, have one of each in stock (even though the clutch is new within the last six months). Started with a base set of tools, not every time I work on the moto and necessarily need a tool I add it to the kit.

Quote:
Originally Posted by hippiebrian View Post
If people keep waiting for the right bike to do the trip, they sometimes don't do the trip. The fun in motorcycling, as I see it, is going with what you have and having fun on the way!
Very true!
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Old 01-31-2014, 07:34 AM   #30
bk brkr baker
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This is my XV920 Yamaha,1981 model. It weighs about 510 lb.s + all the stuff I took , so maybe in the 600 lb.s range. It also has very limited ground clearance and short travel suspension.
It's shown here on the MaGruder Corridor ,reputed to be the longest primative road in the lower 48 states, 148 miles.
You can see the mods I made to prepare for this type riding. Handguards,for weather protection and so if you do tip over ,you won't break your levers. A skid plate to protect the bottom of the engine, on the MaGruder there were hills to climb that had it ringing like cymbals from rock hits.Also a crash bar mainly because there is no frame under the motor to mount the skid plate to.It's also a good place to mount highway pegs, just to have a alternate riding position for the flats.
It's no dirt bike, not even close. But if you are determined and slow down,and pick the right line ,you can go a lot of places.
No one sells skid plates for your Honda 4, you'll have to come up with your own. Metal handguards will fit , crashbars are out there.



Stuff like this may happen. Pick it up and continue.
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