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Old 01-27-2014, 08:27 PM   #16
Foot dragger
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The only bones I have really broke,like a big ol gap showing between each seperated piece......has been from riding fast and taking chances on bicycles.

Raced flattrack for 10 years,some MX,much hairball motorized trailriding,but bicycles have flat jacked me up from time to time.

So Yeah,I would say they're great for cross training.
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Old 01-27-2014, 09:06 PM   #17
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Line Selection

Learning how to pick the right line on a MTB or motorcycle is a similar skill set, naturally you compensate for what you're riding at the time. And of course the fitness gains from riding a bike will make your moto time more enjoyable.
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Old 01-27-2014, 09:29 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by justafurnaceman View Post
Is it a surprise that at least a couple of the MotoGP riders ride bicycles as hobbies too?
NO! Many top pro riders in roadracing, mx, and off road ride bicycles too for fitness. Some of them have become very competitive cyclists such as Spies, Bostrom, Bayliss. For me it has become a time thing. If there is a riding window of only 1-2 hours, I'd much rather spend that time on a bicycle than a moto. I've finally gotten my fitness to the point where I enjoy it all, climbing, descending, mtb or road. It's all good.
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Old 01-27-2014, 10:48 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by mikem9 View Post
Cool bike Gummee! !

I saw a friend tonight who is a racer. He just won a 40+ class regional series in both the Hare Scrambles and Enduro. I asked him about mountain biking and skills carry over. I'll see if I can get him to come here and comment.

His feelings were that mountain biking definitely helped him skill wise in addition to the fitness for racing. He said that during his winning racing season, he increased the amount of mountain biking he was doing. He said that while riding a mountain bike and trying to push fast, he became better at picking the fastest lines because on a mountain bike momentum is everything. He said he definitely felt like this made him faster on the motorcycle in races.
Absolutely the more frequent I was able to ride my mtn bike, the faster I got on my dirt bike. I tried to ride the mtn bike 2 or more times a week and the dirt bike as often as possible between races. The mtn bike training forced me to pick better lines and make momentum your friend. The training also kept your basic skills up like body positioning on the bike, looking through a turn, looking beyond the obstacles or ruts, etc. All of that translated into the dirt bikes whether I was trail riding or racing.
Another side benefit was that at the peak of my mtn bike fitness my leg cramps and arm pump almost disappeared during races. I also noticed that this past winter as my mtn biking frequency slowed down, my dirt bike speed decreased a decent amount. With that decrease in training, my leg cramps and arm pump started coming back which can shut you down during a race.
Not surprisingly, a decent number of the pros are training on mtn bikes to keep up their skills and up their cardio.
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Old 01-28-2014, 05:39 AM   #20
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One of the first things you learn mtn biking is 'you hit what you're looking at.'

If there's a big ole rock in the trail and an itty bitty path around it, if you focus on the rock, that's where you're going. Focus on the path around that rock and that's where you're going.

You wanna get REAL good at picking a line? Ditch the suspension. Ride rigid. That'll learn ya real quick where the good lines are. Rode rigig for more'n a few years in the late 80s before there was such a thing as bicycle suspension.

M
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Old 01-28-2014, 09:13 AM   #21
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My needs are not what they use to just took up bike riding again to get the gut down. Feel like a kid hope the bike holds up. But to go back to the original question helps a little but not really. Got the kid out me once again going over curbs. Hahahahahah poor bike
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Old 01-28-2014, 11:27 AM   #22
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Great thread. I race a lot of MTB XC and Endurance races and the fitness helps on the ADV side a lot, but so does the skills. My coach (yes I have a cycling coach) has me practice drills on the MTB once a week.....things like high and low speed cornering, switchbacks, off-cambers, track stands, finding the best line on a trail and riding obstacles. This past weekend my MTB skills bailed me out in a very sandy section of "road", where i otherwise would have went down on the v-strom.
I've heard this same thing from top motocross and dakar guys.....they ride/race MTB and it makes a huge difference.
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Old 01-28-2014, 12:53 PM   #23
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When I'm not riding my Motorcycle, I'm on my Mountain Bike and when I'm not on a Mountain Bike I'm on my Motor Bike.

The skills easily cary over from one to another.

Have fun.
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Old 01-28-2014, 09:07 PM   #24
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I'm a better motorcycle rider (especially off the pavement) because of 20 years riding and racing mountain bikes before I ever owned a motorcycle.
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Old 01-29-2014, 06:36 AM   #25
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I'm a better motorcycle rider (especially off the pavement) because of 20 years riding and racing mountain bikes before I ever owned a motorcycle.
Maybe that is because you learned on the bicycle long before you got on a motorcycle. I've been doing both since before mountain bikes existed. Yeah, I was riding an old Schwinn paper bike in the desert in the 60's. For me, the speed differential is way too great for there to be a big overlap in skill sets. I choose way different lines switching between them. There is basic stuff that is the same as they are both two wheeled vehicles and thus behave similarly but that is about it.
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Old 01-29-2014, 06:51 AM   #26
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Maybe that is because you learned on the bicycle long before you got on a motorcycle. I've been doing both since before mountain bikes existed. Yeah, I was riding an old Schwinn paper bike in the desert in the 60's. For me, the speed differential is way too great for there to be a big overlap in skill sets. I choose way different lines switching between them. There is basic stuff that is the same as they are both two wheeled vehicles and thus behave similarly but that is about it.

out of curiosity, have you tried downhill riding? I feel I go faster on my Norco, than if I was on my husky on the same trail, I think your right in that the bicycle is more dependent on momentum, but if you can transfer that over to the dirt bike, yee haw!!
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Old 01-29-2014, 02:43 PM   #27
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Mountain biking is what lead me to getting a dirtbike. My knees don't like pedaling though so I've had to really cut back and the dirtibke is a natural substitute and a little more fun.

There is no doubt that riding a bicycle regularly can get you into great shape, but so can a lot of other things that are often cheaper and more convenient. Cycling has also caused me some moderate long term knee pain after several years of intense riding.

Skill wise it depends a lot on how you mountain bike. I think the biggest benefit is not particular skills (ie crossing logs) but the idea that you can shift your weight to control the machine, that you can huck a 3 foot drop on the trail, or that you can unweight the bike and float over some obstacles. Riding aggressive AM/DH/FR changes your idea of what is possible on a bike and I think that carries over really well to a dirtbike even though a lot of the skills and movements and possibilities are different.

I remember hucking a moderate drop for the first time on my two stroke. I weighted the front as I approached the edge and then leaned back as the front tire left the ground just like on the mountain bike. With a little twist of the throttle the bike launched me forward like a rocket. I added a whole new dimension. Can't do that on a peddle bike.
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Old 01-29-2014, 04:59 PM   #28
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Originally Posted by firstlog View Post
Mountain biking is what lead me to getting a dirtbike. My knees don't like pedaling though so I've had to really cut back and the dirtibke is a natural substitute and a little more fun.

There is no doubt that riding a bicycle regularly can get you into great shape, but so can a lot of other things that are often cheaper and more convenient. Cycling has also caused me some moderate long term knee pain after several years of intense riding.

Skill wise it depends a lot on how you mountain bike. I think the biggest benefit is not particular skills (ie crossing logs) but the idea that you can shift your weight to control the machine, that you can huck a 3 foot drop on the trail, or that you can unweight the bike and float over some obstacles. Riding aggressive AM/DH/FR changes your idea of what is possible on a bike and I think that carries over really well to a dirtbike even though a lot of the skills and movements and possibilities are different.

I remember hucking a moderate drop for the first time on my two stroke. I weighted the front as I approached the edge and then leaned back as the front tire left the ground just like on the mountain bike. With a little twist of the throttle the bike launched me forward like a rocket. I added a whole new dimension. Can't do that on a peddle bike.
Right there with you. I raced XC for a bit and still love to ride any kind of technical or fast MTB trails, and I completely credit my mountain biking experience with being able to jump on a dirt bike and actually ride somewhat decently. True, the skills are different, but some of them are actually really useful. Things like conserving your momentum, picking the best line rather than just hammering the suspension, transferring weight, using your entire body to control the bike, finding the rhythm of the trail...that's all stuff that is way more critical on a mountain bike, but has made me a much better rider off road as well.

That said, the effect is more that it gives you a big jump on the early learning curve, rather than making you suddenly a master. I got to the level of 'decent trail rider' pretty quick because of mountain biking, but I don't think there is nearly as much crossover when it comes to 'fast trail rider' or riding really technical stuff where wheelies, clutch/throttle finesse, and really steep ascents/decents, and almost trials-like skills come into play. That will still take just as long to learn as for most other people
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Old 01-29-2014, 08:18 PM   #29
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Originally Posted by 14fg View Post
out of curiosity, have you tried downhill riding? I feel I go faster on my Norco, than if I was on my husky on the same trail, I think your right in that the bicycle is more dependent on momentum, but if you can transfer that over to the dirt bike, yee haw!!
Not proper downhill on the bicycle. I go pretty stinking fast (if I don't say so myself ) downhill on my Husky. I learned all about momentum on the racetrack. I used to race small or underpowered bikes and momentum is the only way to go fast. I actually think I got faster on my bicycle because of my motorcycling not the other way around.

To be perfectly honest, the real answer to the OP's question is "it depends." It depends on your background, what you started riding on and when. I don't think there is one right answer here.
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Old 01-30-2014, 07:22 AM   #30
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OK - here is a hypothetical question to consider. Let's say a study was done, where they took 100 mid level hare scrambles and enduro racers and split the group 50/50.

First they let all 100 ride a race course (combined hare scrambles/enduro) and recorded their individual times on their own bikes. Then, they split the group 50/50 and tried to make the overall average time about the same in both groups.

Then, all 100 riders took 2 months off from riding a motorcycle. During this two months, Group 1 trained on mountain bikes 3 days a week, including cross country and down hill. Group 2 did a combination of running and/or elliptical machine 3 days a week. Both groups also did equal amounts of weight training a couple of days a week.

At the end of two months, all 100 riders once again all rode the same hare scrambles/enduro style race course all out. Then, each racers individual times were compared to their past time, and each groups (mountain biker group vs. running/eliptical group) level of change were compared to each other overall.

Which group would have the best times after those two months off? The group that trained on mountain bikes, or the group that didn't?
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