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Old 02-05-2014, 05:36 AM   #31
hugemoth
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Location: Bend, Oregon summer, Snowbird in winter
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I'm still touring on a 81 GL500 Interstate. 33 years old now and still fits my touring needs perfectly. Rode it on a 9,000 mile Alaska trip last summer and will continue to tour on it for the foreseeable future.
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Old 02-05-2014, 01:52 PM   #32
k-moe
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Originally Posted by rivercreep View Post
I'd like to see you bump start a modern FI bike (without much of a hill around) that has a completely dead battery.
Keep up on maintainance and that won't happen
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Old 02-05-2014, 06:50 PM   #33
rivercreep
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Originally Posted by k-moe View Post
Keep up on maintainance and that won't happen
It will when some asshole turns on your heated grips that you were forced to hot wire to the battery due to space limitations. (and you come out to a dead battery after being inside work all day)
I've since corrected the asshole problem by wiring in a redundant switch that isn't visible...if only I could fix the asshole responses on some posts.
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Old 02-05-2014, 06:54 PM   #34
duckman
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spring 1976, took a brand new monkey shit brown 76 550k from n.y. to mt desert island,then p.e.i then st. Lawrence seaway to quebec then on to west Virginia sky line dr., then DC then home
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Old 02-05-2014, 08:01 PM   #35
tkent02
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Originally Posted by k-moe View Post
Keep up on maintainance and that won't happen
I will if you leave something turned on.
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Old 02-06-2014, 05:11 AM   #36
Tuna Helper
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Originally Posted by tkent02 View Post
Buy a UJM for maybe about $1000, (give or take $800) spend another $1000 getting it in safe reliable condition, then maybe $200 a year for oil changes, tires and such.

Pretty darned inexpensive for a motorcycle.
What are you doing to make it "safe and reliable"?
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Old 02-06-2014, 05:39 AM   #37
Kamloopsrider
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Originally Posted by Prof J View Post
Anybody tour on a 70's or 80's UJM?

I tried many bikes but I still think my 82 Seca is great. One day, when I break free from raising my 5 kids, I want to ride across America. In the meantime, I would enjoy reading about ADVs who do it on old bikes. Any RR's out there?

Prof J
I've got a 73 Norton and a 69 Triumph. An 82 Seca is a modern bike. I hear they even have electric starters now.
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Old 02-06-2014, 05:55 AM   #38
tkent02
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Originally Posted by Tuna Helper View Post
What are you doing to make it "safe and reliable"?
New tires, usually a few bearings, cables, clean the carburetors, clean the brake system, usually upgrade the brakes to a more modern standard. If I'm planning on keeping it long, cartrige emulators in the forks, new shocks, I prefer have a nice smooth ride. Adjust the valves, test and clean up the electrical system, clean out the gas tank if it's grungy. Replace, grease or service everything else that needs it. Fork seals, whatever. Easy stuff, these are simple machines. I enjoy the work, if you hated working on stuff it wouldn't be a good idea.
I try to buy the ones that look nice, not running, as not running is easier to fix than ugly. I won't touch a rust bucket. Too much work.

It usually comes in at just under $1000 when all is done. I have been doing this for years, buy a dead bike, fix it up, ride it until I'm tired of it and sell it at a small profit.

I prefer the Suzukis because they still sell most parts for the old bikes, but have done other brands as well. Honda and Kawasaki drop the parts quick once a model is no longer in production, not Suzuki.

In something like 400,000 miles I have yet to have any of these bikes leave me stranded alongside a road. Ever.
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Old 02-06-2014, 06:11 AM   #39
buls4evr
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Originally Posted by tlub View Post
Except that was done on the antithesis of a UJM, a Triumph. A 500 cc, single carb 'hundred'. Sort of like a Daytona, but the service version with one carb.

But the point is actually well taken. You don't need the latest and greatest. Miles then, for which the old bikes were made (and to me, all UJMs are 'new') are the same 5,280 feet as miles now, and new miles travel just like old miles.

Yup i am aware that he rode a non- Japanese Triumph. My point was that you can travel any kind of terrain for many miles if you have the will to do this on a universal type motorcycle. Doesn't matter who makes it.
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Old 02-06-2014, 06:20 AM   #40
NJ-Brett
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Not a UJM, but I did 9000 miles around the US on a 1979 Triumph Bonneville special.
The only problem I had was a flat front tire at the Grand Canyon.
The bike was not new, and was well abused by the time of the trip.

Good ergonomics for me, nice thick seat, hard fender and grab rail and a flat seat gave plenty of room to strap stuff on the bike.

If you do not want to spend any money, or have ugly heavy crap all over your bike, I do not see a way to carry a lot of stuff on most modern bikes.
And forget about 2 up.
I was once on a long ride with a friend and his girlfrend, bike camping, and when he got a flat, I had my cargo, his cargo, and his girl on my bike, while he rode his bike with a flat to the campground 50 miles away.

Once you set up camp, the bike looked like a normal bike, no hard bags and other junk on the bike.

A valve adjustment was a 10 minute job, the bike held plenty of oil, had a center stand that made fixing a flat easy, the bike was about 400 pounds, so it did ok in the dirt.

My current TU250 is a small version of that, with an over the tail light rack on the back, I can have cargo and the wife on the bike and its comfortable.

Most motorcycles have gone from basic useful transportation to solo race bikes, at least in style, or giant touring sleds.

I would guess the klr650 comes close to an all around bike, but its a water cooled top heavy pig with low power output and oil use problems.
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Old 02-06-2014, 01:07 PM   #41
markjenn
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Originally Posted by NJ-Brett View Post
Most motorcycles have gone from basic useful transportation to solo race bikes, at least in style, or giant touring sleds.

I would guess the klr650 comes close to an all around bike, but its a water cooled top heavy pig with low power output and oil use problems.
Again, have you looked at the new Honda 500's? They're definitely not race bikes nor touring sleds, and they're totally unlike a KLR except in price.

- Mark
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Old 02-06-2014, 01:25 PM   #42
tkent02
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Originally Posted by markjenn View Post
Again, have you looked at the new Honda 500's? They're definitely not race bikes nor touring sleds, and they're totally unlike a KLR except in price.

- Mark
Which honda 500s are you talking about? The ones I see look like fun bikes, but with no way to stack gear and luggage on the back like the old UJMs.
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Old 02-06-2014, 01:33 PM   #43
NJ-Brett
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This is very smart.
Bad paint is not too bad, but rust is.



Quote:
Originally Posted by tkent02 View Post
New tires, usually a few bearings, cables, clean the carburetors, clean the brake system, usually upgrade the brakes to a more modern standard. If I'm planning on keeping it long, cartrige emulators in the forks, new shocks, I prefer have a nice smooth ride. Adjust the valves, test and clean up the electrical system, clean out the gas tank if it's grungy. Replace, grease or service everything else that needs it. Fork seals, whatever. Easy stuff, these are simple machines. I enjoy the work, if you hated working on stuff it wouldn't be a good idea.
I try to buy the ones that look nice, not running, as not running is easier to fix than ugly. I won't touch a rust bucket. Too much work.

It usually comes in at just under $1000 when all is done. I have been doing this for years, buy a dead bike, fix it up, ride it until I'm tired of it and sell it at a small profit.

I prefer the Suzukis because they still sell most parts for the old bikes, but have done other brands as well. Honda and Kawasaki drop the parts quick once a model is no longer in production, not Suzuki.

In something like 400,000 miles I have yet to have any of these bikes leave me stranded alongside a road. Ever.
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Old 02-07-2014, 09:06 AM   #44
markjenn
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tkent02 View Post
Which honda 500s are you talking about? The ones I see look like fun bikes, but with no way to stack gear and luggage on the back like the old UJMs.
The CB500X, CB500R, and CB500F. A lot of good luggage options are available, but you're right, they don't have the wide/broad seats and ability to fit large luggage racks like some UJM's. I brought this model up not to suggest it is a great touring bike, but to present it as a modern-day equivalent of bikes like the old CB350, CB400 Hawks, etc. that folks were lamenting about and saying you couldn't buy a cheap/simple bike today. These 500's are well-rounded and great-performing twins for KLR money.

If you want a modern UJM, the obvious answer is a CB1100. Or a used ZRX which is water-cooled, but otherwise fits the UJM mold to a tee. You can pick up a nice ZRX for $3K and it will run rings around any 70's and 80's UJM.

BTW, having restored both a Suzuki GS750 and a Honda CB750, I disagree with you about Suzuki having better old-bike parts support than Honda and Kawasaki. Honda is by far the best of the Japanese mfgs, and BMW is the best I've seen overall.

- Mark

markjenn screwed with this post 02-07-2014 at 09:13 AM
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Old 02-07-2014, 09:13 AM   #45
TNWillie
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Old GS Suzukis are the way to go. I rode my GS1100G from Charlotte to Chicago a few yrs back to take part in the Mother Road Rally. Rode the length of Rte 66 before heading up the Left Coast and back across. A Plexi-fairing and Eclipse bags made it the perfect tourer. And BWRinger is right about the GSResources forum. A great bunch of helpful GS fanatics, especially Willie, he's awesome. LOL
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