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Old 02-25-2014, 12:14 PM   #1
tumbler45 OP
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Motos Stuck in Bolivia

Looking for a little advise:

We rode from North America towards TDF last year (www.facebook.com/thefuegoproject), ended up having to take a pause in the trip. We left our motos at the BMW dealer in La Paz Bolivia with the intension to return in 10 months. The dealer assured us they would take care of the customs paperwork, in essence freeze our TVIP. Details of the process undertaken by another rider in Peru here:

I was able freeze my permit and store my bike in Peru for 9 mo. The process is quite simple. Go to SUNAT, make sure you have an emergency reason to leave the country. I used "sick mother," a universally accepted emergency in S Am. You will have to show proof of emergency (I used an eMail from my brother) and proof of transport out of the country (I used an eMailed flight itinerary). You then go to the police and let them confirm that the bike is indeed what and where you say it is (sunat will give you a form for them), they check the VIN and confirm where it is stored. Take your papers to SUNAT and you can get permission for up to 12 months. I'd recommend somewhere with a helpful "tourist police" office. I did it in Cuzco.

My permit was reactivated shortly after I returned. They said my paper would work as a temp while I prepared my bike for travel. You are "allowed" five days to get all your paper work going again after you returned to Peru. They didn't seem concerned with this.


The dealer assured us they had done this before and would take care of this process and the bikes will ready for us when we return.

Now, 10 months later our plans have changed. We are unable to return to Bolivia in the next 2 mouths, so we need to ship the bikes back to the USA. When we contacted the dealer to set up shipping they tell us that the bike are illegal because they were in the country too long. It seems they never filed the paperwork. No shipping company will be able to touch the bikes until they are brought back to a legal status.

I am looking for a way to get the bikes legal. So far I have not been able to get an answer from anyone if this is even possible at any cost. I am considering going down in person to try and sort it out, but want to make sure that is not just a waste of time.

What are the fines if we are caught riding the bikes across (or out of) the country? We are about to the point where we are considering abandoning the motos, so we are looking for any option.

Needless to say, I am so frustrated with Andar Motos, the BMW dealer in La Paz. I know, I should have stayed a little longer and handled the process myself, but a family emergency at home required my immediate return. I am just hoping our beloved motos are not lost forever...
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Old 02-25-2014, 01:03 PM   #2
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I'd just ride them out of the country. If you go trying to do things officially, you'll be informing the government that you're in violation which has the possibility to make your bikes disappear forever. I never encountered a single cop or document check in Bolivia. I'd just fly in and ride them out via the Lagunas route. No aduana at the border there. Seems like the kind of thing that'd be best left under the radar.
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Old 02-25-2014, 02:18 PM   #3
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Old 02-25-2014, 03:07 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Airhead Wrangler View Post
I'd just ride them out of the country. If you go trying to do things officially, you'll be informing the government that you're in violation which has the possibility to make your bikes disappear forever. I never encountered a single cop or document check in Bolivia. I'd just fly in and ride them out via the Lagunas route. No aduana at the border there. Seems like the kind of thing that'd be best left under the radar.

+1 That's what I'd do!
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Old 02-26-2014, 06:42 AM   #5
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I'm going to use this as the template for intentionally leaving my bike in SA and coming back to ride it more in 2015.
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Old 02-26-2014, 12:10 PM   #6
tumbler45 OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Airhead Wrangler View Post
I'd just ride them out of the country. If you go trying to do things officially, you'll be informing the government that you're in violation which has the possibility to make your bikes disappear forever. I never encountered a single cop or document check in Bolivia. I'd just fly in and ride them out via the Lagunas route. No aduana at the border there. Seems like the kind of thing that'd be best left under the radar.
What is the Lagunas route?
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Old 02-26-2014, 12:18 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by tumbler45 View Post
What is the Lagunas route?
Southwestern corner of the country, crossing into Chile. There are various roads, all dirt, some of them very sandy and rocky. High altitude desert, with not a lot of people around. There is a relatively decent road that goes as far as Laguna Colorada coming in from the east, and the dirt road from there to the border isn't as bad as the rest of the route to the north. North of there, the westernmost road that hugs the border is pretty rough, rocky, sandy, going.
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Old 02-27-2014, 11:20 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Airhead Wrangler View Post
I never encountered a single cop or document check in Bolivia. I'd just fly in and ride them out via the Lagunas route. No aduana at the border there. Seems like the kind of thing that'd be best left under the radar.
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Old 03-01-2014, 04:46 PM   #9
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The Bolivian immigration at the border on the Lagunas route will ask to see your aduana papers. They have turned back many a rider that didn't know that the aduana is 100ish km before the border. I just used this border last month
Not telling you to do anything illegal but you could Photoshop the document and then try it on at the aduana, apparently a fairly common practice in Bolivia.
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Old 03-01-2014, 04:54 PM   #10
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I missed the aduana on the lagunas route and basically told the immigration folks I didn't have enough gas to make the journey back. $20 US resolved the matter, well at least until a year later when I returned to Bolivia from Paraguay.
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Old 03-01-2014, 05:20 PM   #11
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Isn't there a northern route into Peru on the eastern side of Lake Titicaca without an Aduana?
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Old 03-01-2014, 06:20 PM   #12
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I'm going to hit Copacabana tomorrow.

I was assured there is an aduana there. Whether you have to stop there or not is another question.

I'll scope it out.

La Paz is crazy right now. Not much of a foodie city, though. Unless fried chicken and milanesas are your thing.
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Old 03-01-2014, 07:56 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bouldergeek View Post
I'm going to hit Copacabana tomorrow.

I was assured there is an aduana there. Whether you have to stop there or not
We left there yesterday, there is an aduana but, we went in, did our paperwork, no one was even interested or asked for anything exiting Bolivia.

Clock out of Bolivia with your passport, make no mention of the moto keeping all moto stuff out of sight, ride through to Peru, clock into Peru, they do not ask for any TVIP sruff when clocking into Peru

The Peruvian side did check our passports so get that stamp and you should be home free
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Old 03-02-2014, 12:01 AM   #14
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Get your import closed out if you plan to return to Bolivia with the same bike. It'll still be live in the system when you return if you don't and you'll have some explaining to do.
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Old 03-02-2014, 02:37 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Steam Turbine View Post
Isn't there a northern route into Peru on the eastern side of Lake Titicaca without an Aduana?
I went La Paz, Bolivia to Mojo, Peru the back way in 2007 with my son on Honda XR250 Tornados.

http://www.freewebs.com/shanperu/day...tomojoperu.htm

As you crested the hill before Puerto Acosto there was a customs building on the right. It was almost 6 pm and no one there so we just rode on. No Immigrations at all.... in fact I couldn't tell you when we ever even crossed the Bolivia-Peru Border!

I would go that way (May to October), talk your way thru (I doubt that even now they are very connected to computers, etc..). Make sure you get something from the closest Peruvian police to the border that says you came that way, then when you come around the lake go all the way to Puno aduana and immigrations.. tell them the way you came (showing police paper) .. and they will check you into Peru with 90 days!

Cheers! Toby
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