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Old 03-30-2014, 01:17 PM   #76
Kommando
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Originally Posted by scootrboi View Post
For many years I have been aghast at the size and weight of the motorcycles modern riders are willing to throw a leg over. During the 1980s I started noticing a lot of short stocky people on Goldwings, and saw some really heavy cruisers. I remember a young man on a Yamaha 1100 (I think) who told me he had a special stand he used at traffic lights because the bike was heavy to hold up. These days I see older men and small women piloting motorcycles I would not care to ride, because they are unnecessarily heavy, and challenging to maneuver in less than ideal circumstances. I have seen how riders can lose control of the massive machines at low speed and when trying to park on imperfect pavement. I know a man who gave up his Goldwing after his wife died. He never realized that he couldn't move it without her on the back helping until it fell over on him in his driveway. He was pinned under it and required some neighbors to get it off him. I have seen old guys on huge tourers with training wheels, and lots of tricycles. Is the 1000cc+ displacement that important? There are lightweight machines that are fun to ride, and can go fast. I am strong enough to ride a large machine, having done manual labor all my life, but I don't care to ride a really heavy 2 wheeler.
This is true. Some people are shocked that I'd ride a DR650 across the country. It'll go 100MPH, cruise comfortably enough at 80MPH, and get up to cruising speed quicker than most cars. It'll even do this with a passenger and luggage. Why would I need or want a bigger, heavier, or more-powerful bike?

The same spaciousness can be had on a DL650 as on a DL1000 too, and the DL650 tends to be more frugal and smooth.
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Old 03-30-2014, 05:16 PM   #77
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oh, and i will also consider a can-am sort of ride. I have seen two older gents in my local area lately riding around on a couple. I know they didn't just start riding being both riders looked to be well into their 70's, or even older

sure, why not

+1000.
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Old 03-31-2014, 01:49 AM   #78
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To answer scootrboi, I haven't ruled out a scooter and I've often thought a Burgman 400 might be a good choice for me. I can see one of those or something similar in my future. Good storage, adequate power just all round practical two wheel transport.

Hands down scooters make more sense than motorcycles for most purposes. But if I was sensible I probably wouldn't ride a bike in the first place, now would I?.
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Old 03-31-2014, 03:09 AM   #79
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Unless a health issue strikes that affects my balance, at 58 I think I've got another 10 or 12 years left.

That said, last year I began thinking along the same lines and did a couple of things as a result.

First I sold the (860 lb +) Gold Wing I had owned for 10 years and put that money into a rag-top car. So after 20 years of my wife riding pillion and pretending she enjoyed cold, hot, windy and wet, and generally making noises when my riding/driving scared her, now she also gets to drive and sometimes I get to be scared!

Her impish grin says it all.



After that I sold the DR650. This was harder than selling the Wing. Yes, I had ridden the Wing all over the country, but the DR was my thoughtfully chosen, impeccably cared for, fully outfitted, very personalized steed for a 5,000 mile trip in July 2010 that included about 2/3's of the Continental Divide Trail.

Well ... the DR was ridden around 300 miles last year. It was time to make another choice.

The DR was sold with all the gear, tools, and a butt load of extra stuff to a fellow inmate who plans to ride a lot of dirt over the next several years. He got a great deal.

And that money into a BMW R1100RT.

The RT is just at 250 lbs lighter than the Wing, and moving it around in the carport or maneuvering in a parking lot is a breeze by comparison. It's not my first BMW but it is my first oil-head. I'm enjoying "going to school" on it.

Finally, I don't see me on a trike or a Can Am. When it's time for the RT to go, I'll give it all up and take my place on the porch of the old folks home.

Your story, which is not unlike my own, was very interesting and a well thought approach to the issue of aging IMHO.

I had several Goldwings, but only because it was the only bike the wife would ride on. Unfortunately, over the last several years her hip bothered her to the point she could no longer ride any distance and the GL didn't get ridden very much. As a result we got a Miata, which made riding together fun again - in heat, cold and rain as well as the nice, top-down days. It was nice to have a great handling vehicle again.



The GL1800 (never known in our family for its handling) became something of a garage pig (taking up space and eating some money) that the kids/wife wanted me to get rid of and so it went on the block. During this time, the kid lent me his new GSW when he was riding his Harley. With the (much) lighter weight and better handling of the GS, I discovered that, despite being older than dirt, my skills hadn't deteriorated much at all - it was the excessive weight, poor handling/ and problems with the GL that were affecting my confidence and attitude. Anyway, we dug deep, I got my own GS and we're now doing a whole lot more than just pounding the slab with road sofas. Despite having seen 70 fly by sometime back, I feel like a kid again, especially when exploring off road.

Bottom Line: With our years getting short, the fun of and enthusiasm for riding has never been higher and we are blessed to have the means, both 2 wheeled and 4. Like you, it isn't likely that I will ever have a trike or something like the Can Am.
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Old 03-31-2014, 05:44 AM   #80
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Originally Posted by Lep View Post
To answer scootrboi, I haven't ruled out a scooter and I've often thought a Burgman 400 might be a good choice for me. I can see one of those or something similar in my future. Good storage, adequate power just all round practical two wheel transport.

Hands down scooters make more sense than motorcycles for most purposes. But if I was sensible I probably wouldn't ride a bike in the first place, now would I?.
One of the best things about a scooter is that without all the power, bigness, weight, and other cumbersome qualities that are dedicated to over the speed limit performance, the scooterist is left with a machine that doesn't insulate him from the sensations of riding. I rarely make a trip over 100 miles, but the short trips and errands are a lot of fun. And by scooter I mean under 200cc. The maxi scooters are automatic motorcycles. Having a notch in front of the seat maketh not a scooter.
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Old 04-01-2014, 10:58 AM   #81
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I'm 68 140lbs,with a bad back.
My cbr250r is 200lbs lighter than my bonneville.
AND more fun! :)
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Old 04-01-2014, 11:43 AM   #82
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I tried the car thing. Had a Z3. Nice car. I appreciated it when it was cold and wet, but its not a substitute for riding. Im 67 and just bought a 2011 GS. Yes, the size shows in the slow stuff. Just stick to the street. I can see how smaller is good though.
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Old 04-01-2014, 02:51 PM   #83
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Quote:
Originally Posted by doxiedog View Post
I'm 68 140lbs,with a bad back.
My cbr250r is 200lbs lighter than my bonneville.
AND more fun! :)
In Scooterland, 250cc is called the sweet spot, where you get outstanding fuel efficiency and good performance. To a reasonable degree.
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Old 04-01-2014, 04:20 PM   #84
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Rushmores rock

All I'm saying this thing is fun to ride and very comfortable. Has the harley sound and feel. I have 250 scooter but when I want to put some miles on a trip this trike is very cool. Much lighter steering than I thought. I took it on my normal roads and I know I can do the corners faster than on my Road King I just sold. I know you say I'll never ride a trike. I probably said that in past now my life is older and I'm riding a trike. Just sayin this is more fun than you would think .
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Old 04-01-2014, 06:33 PM   #85
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All I'm saying this thing is fun to ride and very comfortable. Has the harley sound and feel. I have 250 scooter but when I want to put some miles on a trip this trike is very cool. Much lighter steering than I thought. I took it on my normal roads and I know I can do the corners faster than on my Road King I just sold. I know you say I'll never ride a trike. I probably said that in past now my life is older and I'm riding a trike. Just sayin this is more fun than you would think .
It is a handsome machine and I hope you have a lot of good times on it.
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Old 04-22-2014, 05:27 PM   #86
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Yep

Thanks
This machine is comfortable and fun to drive in different and same way as bike.
Try one if your thinking
Harley's can be test drove.
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Old 04-22-2014, 07:42 PM   #87
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Originally Posted by popscycle View Post
Your story, which is not unlike my own, was very interesting and a well thought approach to the issue of aging IMHO.

I had several Goldwings, but only because it was the only bike the wife would ride on. Unfortunately, over the last several years her hip bothered her to the point she could no longer ride any distance and the GL didn't get ridden very much. As a result we got a Miata, which made riding together fun again - in heat, cold and rain as well as the nice, top-down days. It was nice to have a great handling vehicle again.



The GL1800 (never known in our family for its handling) became something of a garage pig (taking up space and eating some money) that the kids/wife wanted me to get rid of and so it went on the block. During this time, the kid lent me his new GSW when he was riding his Harley. With the (much) lighter weight and better handling of the GS, I discovered that, despite being older than dirt, my skills hadn't deteriorated much at all - it was the excessive weight, poor handling/ and problems with the GL that were affecting my confidence and attitude. Anyway, we dug deep, I got my own GS and we're now doing a whole lot more than just pounding the slab with road sofas. Despite having seen 70 fly by sometime back, I feel like a kid again, especially when exploring off road.

Bottom Line: With our years getting short, the fun of and enthusiasm for riding has never been higher and we are blessed to have the means, both 2 wheeled and 4. Like you, it isn't likely that I will ever have a trike or something like the Can Am.
Thanks for sharing the story. That is a superb looking Miata.

Thinking back on it, I was initially drawn to the Z3's because of my past BMW motorcycling experience. We are comfortable with the Z3 but truth told, we could have been or could become equally as comfortable with a Miata or any one of the several other choices.

hapbob, a trike may not be my personal style but don't hear me putting off on the riders who like them. If it works for you, just enjoy it!

And it looks like the snow has thawed. Personally, I'm so glad spring is here and the riding season has reopened that I could SHOUT!
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Old 04-22-2014, 09:39 PM   #88
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WOW................ I want
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Old 04-22-2014, 10:01 PM   #89
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Bought my wife a '72 Fiat 124 Spider Sport when she had to give up riding her motorcycle. She absolutely loves it, and doesn't miss riding her bike at all.



I finally broke down and got a Geezer Glide for us to ride 2up. Kinda liking the slower pace, ABS, cruise, and even the stereo.



Another plus is no longer having to worry about getting a wheelie ticket in Florida...
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Old 04-22-2014, 10:13 PM   #90
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I just finished reading this thread and its insight is overwhelming. I will be 65 this year, I started riding a home built minibike when I was 14 years old. I then worked for the local motorcycle shop and purchased a Bultaco Ace 100. I haven't stopped since. In fact I just purchased a Husqvarna TR650 (my 29th bike) and just finished farkling it.

Truth is I can still ride single track with with confidence but I enjoy it a lot less than I did even two years ago. For me, it is a "been there, done that" and bought the Tee Shirt kinda thing. That said, I bought the TR it to keep me off single track. I purchased a bike that is too heavy intentionally. My biggest worry is that I will try to emulate my younger days (because to a degree I still can) and get hurt badly enough to end my riding altogether. This almost happened last year with a get off and a testicular dislocation (yes, I relocated my nuts & I don't recommend it). While this injury didn't cause me to quit riding it did stop me from riding for four months and it sure as hell made re-evaluate how I ride, where I ride, what I ride and what I can do to mitigate further damage to my body and not add permanence to the tenor sound I had in my voice for weeks after my last crash.

I don't want to stop riding. I lift weights daily, I walk about 5 miles a week. My intent to ride as long as I can. Do I find it harder now? Yes, of course especially given that I have severe arthritis in my hands. But you know what, I am just gonna keep on, keeping on. Like others in this thread I have purchased a Burgman 650 and love it for local commuting and for those cold days when weather protection is a convenience. It is a great errand bike and very comfortable for an old body that jumped out of too many "perfectly good aircraft".

Riding is part of me, it defines who I am, it makes me happy and keeps me relatively sane. If I get to the point where my balance is failing I will buy a Ural. But until then, I ride.

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