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Old 04-01-2014, 12:27 PM   #361
Tuna Helper
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LoachDriver View Post
Your comment caused me - a noob - to wonder what the proper procedure is if the front tire drops off the shoulder, or edge, of the road? My apologies if this question is OT.

LoachDriver.
My method is to keep it straight and upright. Close the throttle and slow down before trying to ride back onto pavement

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Old 04-01-2014, 12:33 PM   #362
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LoachDriver View Post
Your comment caused me - a noob - to wonder what the proper procedure is if the front tire drops off the shoulder, or edge, of the road? My apologies if this question is OT.

LoachDriver.

I would go ahead and go off the road, slowing until I felt safe to get back on. Trying to instinctively get back on instantly is probably the wrong thing to do.

What sucks is if this happens on a corner with a guard rail or drop off. In those cases you're on your own.
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Old 04-02-2014, 07:16 AM   #363
Jim Moore
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Originally Posted by Albie View Post
I guess that depends. Did you get passed at Barber or Jennings by girls on 250's?
I got passed by Melissa Paris once at Jennings. She went by so fast she made me look like I was standing still. Then Josh passed me, and it looked like I was actually going backwards.
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Old 04-02-2014, 10:23 AM   #364
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Albie View Post
I guess that depends. Did you get passed at Barber or Jennings by girls on 250's?
More than once.
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Old 04-04-2014, 07:42 AM   #365
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It generally improves the view when you get passed.
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Old 04-06-2014, 04:54 PM   #366
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Originally Posted by seatec View Post
Its not what I said. A book can get you to think differently. Twist of the wrist sold thousands. Do you know better than Keith code?
Right 100% Read the book then go try it , there is no other way to ride, you were doing it anyway and didn't know it. You can not argue with code period!
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Old 04-07-2014, 09:42 AM   #367
ObiJohn
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Originally Posted by anotherguy View Post
In order to initiate a turn with a single track vehicle you must create a primary imbalance and then steer into that imbalance to complete the process. Commonly referred to as countersteering.

Now stop typing and go do it.
^^This.

Countersteering creates the imbalance to lean the bike... and then the rider must increase/decrease the angle of the front wheel appropriately to keep the bike on the desired path.

The simple trick of not falling on any two-wheeled vehicle is to turn the front wheel in the direction you are falling until the forces that are making the bike fall/lean are balanced. Turning the wheel makes the bike lean away from the direction the front wheel is turned into, and how much it leans away is a function of the angle the front wheel is turned combined with the speed of the bike.

That's why, in all of these photos of racers in high speed turns, the front wheel is turned toward the direction of the turn... because the rider has moved his Cg towards the inside of the turn the front wheel is turned in to keep the bike from falling in (the rider's moved Cg lets the bike take the same turn radius at a more upright angle). This helps the rider take a sharper turn without having to lean the bike as much, preventing dragging of hard parts or rolling too far to the inside of the highest-grip part of the tire. If the rider were more upright (more centered on the bike), the front wheel would be turned less, the bike would be leaning more, and perhaps sliding after a hard part hits.
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Old 04-21-2014, 04:03 PM   #368
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I followed this thread with keen interest this winter, looking forward to springtime and steeper lean angles. I have been riding with more enthusiasm through corners, but almost fell over today when (I think) the wheels were not gyroscopic enough to sustain my angle.
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Old 04-22-2014, 03:59 PM   #369
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Vespa Turns


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Old 04-22-2014, 06:18 PM   #370
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For me, eye discipline is paramount. Keeping my eyes up, looking as far down the road or around a turn toward the vanishing point (where your view of the road actually ends) makes my riding far smoother. If the vanishing point gets closer, I am rolling out of the throttle or trail braking because the turn is tightening up. If the vanishing point gets further away, I can add throttle because the turn radius is increasing.
Motorcycle riding or snow skiing seem to work best when I am looking ahead as far as possible and concentrating on my line. There is paralysis lurking for those who try to think about too many things at once. (Should I hang off? Should I brake? Is my outside arm relaxed? What did Keith Code say I should do in this situation?)
Any tar snakes, potholes, gravel, or other problems should be noticed with a quick glance - then immediately get your eyes up and looking down the road. If you look at them (target fixation), or even beside them where you want to steer, your eyes will end up looking down at the road right in front of your bike. When you look back up, I guarantee you will be making a recovery correction because you have wandered off line.
Visual discipline is everything. All the other techniques (leaning, braking, counter steering, accelerating, shifting, etc.) should be done by muscle memory and subconsciously so your bike can follow the line your eyes have chosen.
Read this over and over until you understand it. It took me decades to figure out and continued practice to retain. It is important. It made me a far smoother rider. It just might save one of our asses.
Sorry to be preachy, I know I'm a bit of a fanatic about this...
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Old 04-22-2014, 09:14 PM   #371
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scootrboi View Post
I wonder if pullback bars confuse things. The principle seems more clear for me with simple European style bars.
They make it VERY difficult to steer accurately, especially if you need to be forceful to get the bike to move quickly. Just a few inches makes a huge difference. I don't know why anyone would use them, unless they just have no idea how a motorcycle is supposed to work.
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Old 04-23-2014, 06:02 AM   #372
atomicalex
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Originally Posted by Farmer Hank View Post
Visual discipline is everything. All the other techniques (leaning, braking, counter steering, accelerating, shifting, etc.) should be done by muscle memory and subconsciously so your bike can follow the line your eyes have chosen.
Hear, hear!!

I got into a hairy situation this past weekend on an unfamiliar road. My own fault completely. The curve was signed, I read the sign, yadda yadda, still went into it way the hell too hot.

First thing to mind was look up look up look where you want to go chin chin!! Bike just followed my face around like "dude, whatever".

To be clear - I was headed for the weeds until I got my head swiveled. I was still braking past the apex. My body was doing a whole lot of stuff that I did not even think about. At the exit, I had a WTF moment - how did I save that?

Good visual discipline. Every survival reaction begins with running out of visual room.

If you only take one thing away from TotW - that is the one thing to take with you.
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Old 04-23-2014, 06:46 AM   #373
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tkent02 View Post
They make it VERY difficult to steer accurately, especially if you need to be forceful to get the bike to move quickly. Just a few inches makes a huge difference. I don't know why anyone would use them, unless they just have no idea how a motorcycle is supposed to work.
wrong. if that's the case for you then perhaps it's you who doesn't know how a motorcycle works.
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Old 04-24-2014, 04:34 AM   #374
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t rex

Quote:
Originally Posted by farmerstu View Post
wrong. if that's the case for you then perhaps it's you who doesn't know how a motorcycle works.
I thought pullback bars are for short riders whose arms aren't long enough for standard handlebars.
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Old 04-24-2014, 06:22 AM   #375
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LoachDriver View Post
Your comment caused me - a noob - to wonder what the proper procedure is if the front tire drops off the shoulder, or edge, of the road? My apologies if this question is OT.

LoachDriver.
Hang on,dodge the next obstacle, try to stay alive ?.

I was run off a road once, spent the longest 20 seconds of my life dodging trees one at a time, finally slowed up, then spent another hour crawling back up to the road.

Pete
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