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Old 04-20-2014, 07:59 AM   #1
caponerd OP
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They're out. Finally.

Any accusations that I'm a welder will be denied vehemently.
I'd been playing around with some 18ga. sheet metal, then decided I could handle putting a bead around the outer steering head races in my R100 frame.
Forgot to crank the voltage up to max.
But I got enough stuck on there to loosen them a little, and it stayed put long enough for me to use the lumps to punch the races out.
Turned out to be a lot easier than I expected. I'd do it again if necessary.
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Old 04-20-2014, 08:58 AM   #2
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Heh. Turn up the heat, and turn down the wire feed. You got no penetration there.

GOOD JOB. Looks just like my first 'weld'.

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Old 04-20-2014, 09:36 AM   #3
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Bearing race

I have been welding most of my life. The majority of welding I do these days is on bikes and hot rods.
The way I have done this is to use a fender washer with an OD that drops about halfway into the race. Weld the washer in place. Usually four or five short beads are enough. The heat does most of the work. Put a slide hammer through the hole in the fender washer and a couple of light taps pops it right out.

2HE
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Old 04-20-2014, 09:42 AM   #4
Kai Ju
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Twin headlight Ernie View Post
I have been welding most of my life. The majority of welding I do these days is on bikes and hot rods.
The way I have done this is to use a fender washer with an OD that drops about halfway into the race. Weld the washer in place. Usually four or five short beads are enough. The heat does most of the work. Put a slide hammer through the hole in the fender washer and a couple of light taps pops it right out.

2HE
That ought to go in Tips and Tricks, thanks.
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Old 04-20-2014, 09:52 AM   #5
Bill Harris
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Twin headlight Ernie View Post
I have been welding most of my life. The majority of welding I do these days is on bikes and hot rods.
The way I have done this is to use a fender washer with an OD that drops about halfway into the race. Weld the washer in place. Usually four or five short beads are enough. The heat does most of the work. Put a slide hammer through the hole in the fender washer and a couple of light taps pops it right out.

2HE
Bingo^2. One of the best solutions I've heard. Especially for the noob welder.

:)

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Old 04-21-2014, 08:26 AM   #6
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SPOT ON. Never thought of that. THANKS!!!


Quote:
Originally Posted by Twin headlight Ernie View Post
I have been welding most of my life. The majority of welding I do these days is on bikes and hot rods.
The way I have done this is to use a fender washer with an OD that drops about halfway into the race. Weld the washer in place. Usually four or five short beads are enough. The heat does most of the work. Put a slide hammer through the hole in the fender washer and a couple of light taps pops it right out.

2HE
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Old 04-21-2014, 12:12 PM   #7
FrankR80GS
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Originally Posted by Beater View Post
Heh. Turn up the heat, and turn down the wire feed. You got no penetration there.

GOOD JOB. Looks just like my first 'weld'.

Well, bearing races are 100Cr6, that's high carbon steel with 1%Cr. Not the easiest start for beginners.
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Old 04-21-2014, 12:52 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Twin headlight Ernie View Post
I have been welding most of my life. The majority of welding I do these days is on bikes and hot rods.
The way I have done this is to use a fender washer with an OD that drops about halfway into the race. Weld the washer in place. Usually four or five short beads are enough. The heat does most of the work. Put a slide hammer through the hole in the fender washer and a couple of light taps pops it right out.

2HE
That would have been faster than what I did last weekend to get my rear wheel bearing out on my DR350:



If I'd have just done this first thing instead of messing around with a punch trying to drive it out the normal way, I'd have saved myself 45 minutes of frustration.
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Old 04-21-2014, 12:58 PM   #9
supershaft
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It's easiest just to lay a bead around the race. They fall right out. No need to weld anything to them. The hardness of the race has nothing to do with it.
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Old 04-21-2014, 04:33 PM   #10
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I have done it this way. I tack welded a steel nail that I cut to fit about the middle of the race. I then use a long segment of pipe through the top/bottom and drive them right out.

I have since bought the cycleworks kit and for the money I think it is a lot easier and there is no need to worry about welding the race into the frame like a friend of mine did.
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Old 04-21-2014, 06:39 PM   #11
caponerd OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Twin headlight Ernie View Post
I have been welding most of my life. The majority of welding I do these days is on bikes and hot rods.
The way I have done this is to use a fender washer with an OD that drops about halfway into the race. Weld the washer in place. Usually four or five short beads are enough. The heat does most of the work. Put a slide hammer through the hole in the fender washer and a couple of light taps pops it right out.

2HE
Great trick. I could manage that, even with my present poor skill level.
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Old 04-21-2014, 06:41 PM   #12
caponerd OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by r60man View Post
I have done it this way. I tack welded a steel nail that I cut to fit about the middle of the race. I then use a long segment of pipe through the top/bottom and drive them right out.

I have since bought the cycleworks kit and for the money I think it is a lot easier and there is no need to worry about welding the race into the frame like a friend of mine did.
That was my biggest worry. Turned out ok, even on the lower race where my visibility was pretty restricted.
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Old 04-22-2014, 12:49 AM   #13
ME 109
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Quote:
Originally Posted by r60man View Post

I have since bought the cycleworks kit and for the money I think it is a lot easier and there is no need to worry about welding the race into the frame like a friend of mine did.
That's a cheap race frame!
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Old 04-22-2014, 11:03 PM   #14
Wirespokes
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How did you remove the lower inner race from the bottom tree?
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Old 04-22-2014, 11:45 PM   #15
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What really helped me was doubling up on the reading glasses under the hood. Doggone, I got much better at dat' weldin'.
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