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Old 06-30-2014, 09:04 PM   #76
96R1100GS OP
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Wow! This post got a lot of activity and I find it so interesting that so many people who read the post have hit or come close to hitting deer too. My current solution is to slow down in the thickets where I can't see if they're there or not and when in the fields let her rip. Now though the plants in the fields are getting high enough where this is tough to do. I believe that lights aren't going to help that much because the deer I have hit are the ones I didn't see not because of not enough light but because it just popped out of nowhere. My conclusion is that that when in known deer country I just gotta slow down.
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Old 07-01-2014, 10:07 AM   #77
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I get that question a lot from my MSF students, and living in Wisconsin means it is a truly relative question about riding. My tactics include:
  • knowing your riding areas and deer concentrations around the state,
  • expecting the damn things all the time, everywhere, all roads, any time,
  • scanning, searching, constantly, slow down any time I sense a danger area,
  • train my eyes to register the deer brown color vs background color,
  • ANY trees/cover/water near the road means added danger, prepare myself,
  • corn fields, especially when higher hide a lot of deer, more on secondary roads,
  • deer are stupid, they'll run right into you when you try to avoid them. I saw a deer twice adjust its path as I changed my speed. It was running across an empty field toward my path (friggin Taliban Deer). Has something to do with their mentality to stay ahead of a predatory threat. I finally beat it on speed and it passed behind me. I had a bulk t-bone my car back in 2009 when it could have passed behind me, but it tried to run out in front of the car (predator?),
  • in general, if I encounter one on the road, I brake hard and fast in a straight line and aim for the deer's ass (NASCAR crash mentality) in hopes it won't be there when I get there,
But even noted cycle safety guru Larry Grotsky was taken out by a deer, at night, while crossing Texas.
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Old 07-04-2014, 10:23 AM   #78
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Ride with the cagers (late morning to mid afternoon on back roads or a little past 7:00pm on highways), when deer are wary of the roadside. Windy or blustery days are better as hunters know, since deer hunker down. Suburban deer have some learned caution, but a loud noise from behind will always spook them into jumping. There is no way to anticipate that, and they can accelerate to about 25mph almost instantly.
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Old 07-07-2014, 04:12 PM   #79
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I haven't started riding yet, and I have yet to strike a deer with anything... but man, have I come close many times.
Good lights are a must, so you can see them sooner... but they certainly do "freeze" when blinded by headlights at night. That can be a problem. I don't know about the whistles, but I have found that tooting the horn seems to run them off; I've even had deer pause then turn away when I honked at them, just as they were about to step in front of my vehicle. I will also second- or third- the assertion that IF YOU SEE ONE CROSS THE ROAD, THERE WILL BE ANOTHER ONE ALONG SHORTLY. Theycan surprise you, too- they will come over hedges, over fences, out of dense undergrowth. They will stand there on the shoulder calmly, then suddenly dash in front of you as you pass by.
Slow down when deer might be a problem (know their habits and habitat), use the high beam when you can, toot that horn...and be lucky, I guess.
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Old 07-09-2014, 08:34 PM   #80
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TN3Sport View Post

Is this method advisable?
I don't know if it's advisable but it's the SAME ONE I use regardless if I'm on a bike or in a car.
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Old 07-10-2014, 08:03 AM   #81
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I was riding a class-four road in Vermont last Friday weekend, where said road goes from "maintained for the convenience of and at the expense of the developer trying to build a subdivision" to "not really maintained". Deer is hanging out a little to the right of the roadway, looks up at a coming, bolts left. I don't worry about it, continue slowing to line up my approach as we go into the trees and head up the rougher road, and the damned thing bolts back across in front of me, left-to-right.

I was not expecting that.

Then on Saturday, in northern New Hampshire, I saw a few. The second one materialized as a flash of brown movement while I was rolling along a logging road at medium pace; I got on the binders and stopped as it ran onto the roadway, followed shortly by a very cute, still-spotted fawn. The last one was standing in the logging road (somewhere between a one-lane roadway and doubletrack at that point), munching on the tall grass. I rolled up and stopped.

It kept an eye on me and returned to eating.

I pulled my camera out of my chest pocket and took a couple of photos.

It kept an eye on me and kept eating.

I decided to switch to video mode on the camera.

It took a couple of steps down the road and returned to eating.

About a minute (maybe 90 seconds) after stopping, I finally decided to keep rolling. I felt bad, as the deer decided to head up the roadway for maybe 1/8 of a mile before turning off.

So, yeah, your guess about their behavior is probably as good as mine.
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Old 07-11-2014, 06:25 AM   #82
Andyvh1959
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Like a hunter told me that deer tend to try and run ahead of what they perceive is a predator, he also said deer tend to first react/run whichever way they are pointed, THEN turn back around to where they were previously because it was safe where they were.

May explain the deer that bolts to the left out of your way then at the last second turns back right into your path. Certainly are not the brightest critters in the woods.

Just last Saturday my gal and I went for a day long ride. On the way home after dinner, we counted over 15 deer in the fields along the roads. She is getting pretty good at seeing them.
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Old 07-11-2014, 10:18 AM   #83
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Support your local deer hunters...
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Old 07-11-2014, 11:00 AM   #84
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Deer tactics have gotten more serious since the moose came back.
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Old 07-14-2014, 06:50 AM   #85
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Old 07-23-2014, 07:55 AM   #86
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andyvh1959 View Post
I get that question a lot from my MSF students, and living in Wisconsin means it is a truly relative question about riding. My tactics include:
  • knowing your riding areas and deer concentrations around the state,
  • expecting the damn things all the time, everywhere, all roads, any time,
  • scanning, searching, constantly, slow down any time I sense a danger area,
  • train my eyes to register the deer brown color vs background color,
  • ANY trees/cover/water near the road means added danger, prepare myself,
  • corn fields, especially when higher hide a lot of deer, more on secondary roads,
  • deer are stupid, they'll run right into you when you try to avoid them. I saw a deer twice adjust its path as I changed my speed. It was running across an empty field toward my path (friggin Taliban Deer). Has something to do with their mentality to stay ahead of a predatory threat. I finally beat it on speed and it passed behind me. I had a bulk t-bone my car back in 2009 when it could have passed behind me, but it tried to run out in front of the car (predator?),
  • in general, if I encounter one on the road, I brake hard and fast in a straight line and aim for the deer's ass (NASCAR crash mentality) in hopes it won't be there when I get there,
But even noted cycle safety guru Larry Grotsky was taken out by a deer, at night, while crossing Texas.

All good advice. I live in a very rural area and see whitetail nearly every day, and occasionally moose, elk and occasionally bears. While they can be anywhere, there are certainly places that they are most common, especially when cover (brush/timber) comes all the way to the road. Basic rules:

1) Much like cagers, assume they are trying to kill you. They set up ambushes, hiding in ditches, in brush along the road or simply "freezing", until you are within their kill zone. Counter by recognizing likely ambush points and scan intensively.

2) Deer are cowards-they won't come at you one at a time but prefer to have you outnumbered. While one has your attention, another will try to flank you and put you under direct fire. Be aware-if you see one, there are usually at least 2 more around.

3) Be proactive. Get a hunting licensce. It works-they are much harder to find during hunting season. Heck, I think if I could figure out how to mount the Winchester to the bike I'd never see a deer on a ride. Would beat "deer whistles". Might smarten up the occasional cager as well.


I had them attempt an ambush on me last night on my own driveway. I'm heading up it...see the two preparing to attack from the field next to the driveway. Remembering item two, I slow down...just as number 3 shoots across in front of me, less than a bike length away. Ha, missed me.
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Old 07-23-2014, 09:02 AM   #87
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i would prefer to kill them all.
the only realistic thing i can think of is to lobby your local government to mow the right of ways. that will at least give a person a chance to see them before they dart onto the road.
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Old 07-23-2014, 09:21 AM   #88
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Letting deer populations spiral out of control is animal cruelty. By their protection tactics, the metermaids of the forest, F&W, have made the deer a menace on the environment. Of course they're just doing the king's bidding.

I drive right at their ass and give them a big growl. Nothing much works when their in rut. The signs are starting to show around here. Slow down and be ready.
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Old 07-28-2014, 04:42 AM   #89
tessalino
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If you truly want to avoid seeing deer, buy a license, invest in thousands of dollars of hunting gear, scout your hunting territory to be sure deer are present, get up hours before dawn and drive to your spot, and be on your stand at least an hour before dawn.

You won't see a thing.

If, however, you want to be assured of a kill, drive the roads in deer country. They can dodge a bullet traveling 2300 fps, but can't dodge a well lighted vehicle traveling 30 mph.
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Old 07-28-2014, 06:08 AM   #90
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tessalino View Post
If you truly want to avoid seeing deer, buy a license, invest in thousands of dollars of hunting gear, scout your hunting territory to be sure deer are present, get up hours before dawn and drive to your spot, and be on your stand at least an hour before dawn.

You won't see a thing.

If, however, you want to be assured of a kill, drive the roads in deer country. They can dodge a bullet traveling 2300 fps, but can't dodge a well lighted vehicle traveling 30 mph.
Maybe we need to move the hunting areas to the roads, this would ensure that the forest rats stay away from them....
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