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Old 07-21-2014, 03:13 PM   #46
Navy Chief
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Originally Posted by scootrboi View Post
not...pass?
Shocking I know....
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Old 07-21-2014, 04:44 PM   #47
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Originally Posted by GreyThumper View Post
I'm a bit concerned that my twin headlights might be mistaken for a distant car as well ...
The reason I posted. Maybe somebody will benefit from my mistake.
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You fucked the things up. Admit it, analyze it, understand it so you don't repeat it, accept it, and move on.
Fixed. Ignore my posts if not interested in the analysis.
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How'd I do ???
Quite well.
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Correct Answer: Sit back and enjoy the ride without the pass, 5 mph of speed difference is going to make almost no difference in when you arrive.
Not my nature. It's a character flaw. Besides, 5 mph under is more like a 15 mph difference.
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Old 07-21-2014, 05:38 PM   #48
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Originally Posted by Sparrowhawk View Post
Ignore my posts if not interested in the analysis.
Sorry but you don't sound like you want to analyse it to me. You sound like you want to find excuses.
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Old 07-21-2014, 06:55 PM   #49
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Absolutely no need to attack the guy. He made a mistake and fessed up to it publically. Could've been a horrible accident - but at the end of the day, it was just a 'could've' experience. I've had similar mental hiccups when tired and/or in strange lighting conditions. It happens to the best of us. A good tale of caution for us all.
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Old 07-21-2014, 07:53 PM   #50
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I've experienced many optical illusions on the road over the years. Had a similar fake out a few years ago, went to pass a truck out in the middle of nowhere saw the lights at what looked like a long distance. Turned out to be two bicycles with bright headlights riding side by side in the oncoming traffic lane. The small bucket size made them look a long way off. Luckily I just didnt like the spot and stayed behind the truck, although I likely would have been fine, as they were plenty far away and the car I was driving passed well.... ;) The shock was when we tooled by and I saw they were cycles.

was about 2:00 AM btw.. So it isn't like you'd expect bikes 100 miles out in the middle of the high Oregon desert, in November.. Tough SOB's it was about 35 out..
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Old 07-22-2014, 01:18 AM   #51
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At night, my brother's MTS1200 looks likes a car in the distance. This is just based on observation looking back at him.

Not his bike:


Note that the low beams are spread fairly far apart.

This thread makes me want to get aux lights sooner.
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Old 07-23-2014, 09:27 AM   #52
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Originally Posted by Sparrowhawk View Post
OK, since no mathmeticians have jumped in I will do the work myself. Here is a puzzler for anybody wanting to try. I'll post the answer later.

While driving home through Montana today I figured out how far away the Harley's appeared on that stretch of highway if they were oncoming cars, about 8/10 mile.

Here's the puzzle. A person (me) wants to pass a semi and five cars that are going 65 mph in a 70 mph zone. The cars are following each other and the truck about two car lengths apart. I am following the last car about two car lengths back and, because I am such a careful driver, I want to give the truck a full semi length of space before pulling back in. There is an oncoming car about 0.8 miles down the road probably doing 75 mph. As I pass the line of vehicles I will do 90 mph. Is this a safe pass and what will be the distance betweem me and the oncoming car when I pull back into my lane?
Here's the puzzle. At 65 mph what is the minimum safe following distance behind a semi and five cars? A. 40 feet. B. 192 feet or "One Mississippi Two Mississippi" C. 192 feet plus extra Mississippi distance due to multiple vehicles ahead following too closely.
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Old 07-23-2014, 10:57 AM   #53
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Originally Posted by dduelin View Post
Here's the puzzle. At 65 mph what is the minimum safe following distance behind a semi and five cars? A. 40 feet. B. 192 feet or "One Mississippi Two Mississippi" C. 192 feet plus extra Mississippi distance due to multiple vehicles ahead following too closely.
No hard fast answer to that question, there are simply too many variables:
- Road conditions
- Visibility
- Weather
- Driver behavior
- Speed
- Amount of buffeting coming of the back of the semi

just to name a few...
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Old 07-23-2014, 12:02 PM   #54
dduelin
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Originally Posted by Navy Chief View Post
No hard fast answer to that question, there are simply too many variables:
- Road conditions
- Visibility
- Weather
- Driver behavior
- Speed
- Amount of buffeting coming of the back of the semi

just to name a few...
Hint: It's not the OPs two car lengths.

C's extra Mississippi gives the Navy Chief all the cover his variables need for "safe minimum distance". Variables add, not subtract.
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Old 07-23-2014, 12:44 PM   #55
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Originally Posted by dduelin View Post
Here's the puzzle. At 65 mph what is the minimum safe following distance behind a semi and five cars? A. 40 feet. B. 192 feet or "One Mississippi Two Mississippi" C. 192 feet plus extra Mississippi distance due to multiple vehicles ahead following too closely.
Being from the west I prefer one Colorado, two Colorado, three Colorado. It's an interesting point though. When passing, how close to the vehicle being passed should a person be before moving into the oncoming lane? I don't remember that being discussed at driver's training. The back stretch NASCAR pass is the most exhilarating. Maybe you should start a thread on the topic.

Since were are off topic about motorcycle headlights looking like distant automobiles, here are a couple of interesting items related to motorcycle safety and visual cues.



http://rideapart.com/2013/12/motorcy...s-brain-blame/

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Old 07-23-2014, 01:14 PM   #56
dduelin
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Originally Posted by Sparrowhawk View Post
Being from the west I prefer one Colorado, two Colorado, three Colorado. It's an interesting point though. When passing, how close to the vehicle being passed should a person be before moving into the oncoming lane? I don't remember that being discussed at driver's training. The back stretch NASCAR pass is the most exhilarating. Maybe you should start a thread on the topic.

Since were are off topic about motorcycle headlights looking like distant automobiles, here are a couple of interesting items related to motorcycle safety and visual cues.

>
You would enjoy reading The Upper Half Of The Motorcycle by Spiegel.
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Old 07-23-2014, 02:00 PM   #57
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Originally Posted by Sparrowhawk View Post
Here's the puzzle. A person (me) wants to pass a semi and five cars that are going 65 mph in a 70 mph zone. The cars are following each other and the truck about two car lengths apart. I am following the last car about two car lengths back and, because I am such a careful driver, I want to give the truck a full semi length of space before pulling back in. There is an oncoming car about 0.8 miles down the road probably doing 75 mph. As I pass the line of vehicles I will do 90 mph. Is this a safe pass and what will be the distance betweem me and the oncoming car when I pull back into my lane?
No mathematicians in the house it seems. This little bit of elementary algebra (from the Arabic al-jebr, meaning "reunion of broken parts") and arithmetic (from the Greek arithmos, meaning numbers) is just a warm-up to the more important question of "Just how close were those Harley's anyway?" Then we can answer DesertTortoise's question " How long will it take for my passengers to see their life flash before their eyes?"

I have 2 semi lengths, 5 cars, and 6 two-car spaces to pass. I'm going 25 mph faster than the line of vehicles so it takes me about 12 seconds (12 Colorados)to get passed. In that 12 seconds I travel 0.3 miles of the 0.8 mile separation and the oncoming car travels 0.25 miles. If everything works as planned there is a quarter mile between me and the oncoming car when I move back into my lane.

But things do not work out as planned. I saw what I wanted (or expected) to see, not what was actually there. On to part two.
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Old 07-23-2014, 02:01 PM   #58
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You would enjoy reading The Upper Half Of The Motorcycle by Spiegel.
Thanks, I'll check it out.
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Old 07-23-2014, 02:04 PM   #59
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Originally Posted by bio388 View Post
Absolutely no need to attack the guy. He made a mistake and fessed up to it publically. Could've been a horrible accident - but at the end of the day, it was just a 'could've' experience. I've had similar mental hiccups when tired and/or in strange lighting conditions. It happens to the best of us. A good tale of caution for us all.
You're kind of new around here, aren't you?
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Old 07-23-2014, 02:06 PM   #60
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Originally Posted by Sparrowhawk View Post
It's an interesting point though. When passing, how close to the vehicle being passed should a person be before moving into the oncoming lane? I don't remember that being discussed at driver's training. The back stretch NASCAR pass is the most exhilarating. Maybe you should start a thread on the topic.

When I'm stuck behind several vehicles and feel the need to pass, I'll drop back farther than usual from the vehicle in front of me. Back a little farther, I can see around them better, and as I see an opportunity to pass approach, I'll get a running start and pick up my speed. If timed correctly, the oncoming car has just passed as I reach the point where I have to either pull around the vehicle being passed or hit my brakes. If I proceed with my pass, I'm already at (or very near) passing speed, rather than counting on acceleration.

Also, since I started with a little more following distance, I unavoidably make it a little harder for someone BEHIND me to initiate a multiple vehicle pass. For me there's always a major pucker instant when someone tries to pass me the same instant I'm changing lanes to start my pass.
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