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Old 03-04-2012, 06:22 AM   #16
SuchesTom
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It's fine, use 3/4 pressure treated plywood over floor if bikes hit between supports and sag expanded metal. Keep bearings greased and buy spare tire and wheel. Trailer comes with low end tires so change them early and it should work for years.

I've hauled on one like it a good bit with no problems.
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Old 03-04-2012, 07:12 AM   #17
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Don't do it.
Cheaping out on a trailer with, maybe, $18,000 worth of bikes aboard makes no sense. Get a "real" trailer rated to twice the load weight you expect. Use large, 'real-car' like, mutiple ply tires. Cheap trailers have cheap tires, and a blow-out at speed with your bikes in tow ruins your entire day. Don't use safety chains which attach with those little hooks; instead use screw-type carabiners (for lack of a better term).

Get the larger trailer as shown on previous replies. Craig's List is a good place to start. Use multiple tie-downs and don't over-tighten them ( I use at least 4 per bike; the higher up on the frame the better ). DON'T trailer your bikes with the sidestand or centerstand down. DO get a couple front wheel chocks and bolt them solidly to the trailer floor; Harbor freight or Northern Tools have inexpensive chocks which will suffice. Do install a rear wheel chock which restricts the rear wheel from sliding left to right from the road vibrations.

Most of us find a good trailer to be very helpful even when you're not towing bikes. They're lower than the bed of a pickup truck and they have hundreds of uses. You'll find that friends and neighbors will come-a-knockin to borrow your trailer pretty regularly. Mine has been worth it's weight in beer :)
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Old 03-04-2012, 08:56 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Outwardbound View Post
Get a "real" trailer rated to twice the load weight you expect.
Actually, matching the load capacity to your load is a much better idea. You need weight on the trailer for the suspension to work.
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Old 03-04-2012, 09:51 AM   #19
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Lowes trailer

I have exactly the same trailer. Hauled a 1200GS from Kalispel, Montana to Atlanta (2,700 miles in a round-about route) without issues. The pulling vehicle is as important as the trailer in my case.

Highly recommend Harper Freight chokes. They were on sale for $39 last week.) And yeah, you'll need a sheet of plywood on the floor. I bought a 1/2" exterior plywood, painted black, both sides. Two bikes will be a pretty tight fit to keep them from banging against each other. Don't compress the front fork too much or you'll blow the seals.
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Old 03-04-2012, 03:18 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Outwardbound View Post
Don't do it.
Cheaping out on a trailer with, maybe, $18,000 worth of bikes aboard makes no sense. Get a "real" trailer rated to twice the load weight you expect. Use large, 'real-car' like, mutiple ply tires. Cheap trailers have cheap tires, and a blow-out at speed with your bikes in tow ruins your entire day. Don't use safety chains which attach with those little hooks; instead use screw-type carabiners (for lack of a better term).

Get the larger trailer as shown on previous replies. Craig's List is a good place to start. Use multiple tie-downs and don't over-tighten them ( I use at least 4 per bike; the higher up on the frame the better ). DON'T trailer your bikes with the sidestand or centerstand down. DO get a couple front wheel chocks and bolt them solidly to the trailer floor; Harbor freight or Northern Tools have inexpensive chocks which will suffice. Do install a rear wheel chock which restricts the rear wheel from sliding left to right from the road vibrations.

Most of us find a good trailer to be very helpful even when you're not towing bikes. They're lower than the bed of a pickup truck and they have hundreds of uses. You'll find that friends and neighbors will come-a-knockin to borrow your trailer pretty regularly. Mine has been worth it's weight in beer :)
While extra load capacity is nice... the trailer you described is heavier, wider, taller and pulls harder. Now before you fire back, bear in mind some of us have big block one ton trucks and leave them at home to use the VW TDI for a 1500 mile trip. I have towed many... the original proposal will do nicely. Spare tires are always a great idea. Bearings lubed and PROPERLY adjusted as well. (ALWAYS check them, ESPECIALLY on a NEW trailer) The trailer he describes has the load carrying capacity with a little extra. It will work fine, so long as the bikes are rigged with common sense.
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Old 03-05-2012, 06:33 AM   #21
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The trailer listed has a 1650# load limit, which is pretty close to twice the weight of the XC and the Ninja. That should put it in the middle of the suspension range-of-travel, so it should be OK. Flooring wise plywood would work, but I personally am not a big fan. Plywood adds little structural stiffness and will need replacing after a couple years. A sheet if 1/8 alu diamond plate is a bit pricey at $200, but looks da bomb and is bullet proof. Frame-wise, if you add a few pieces to triangulate the frame (especially the tongue) it would be far better from a stiffness standpoint. That leaves tires. If the bolt pattern would support 13 in wheels I'd make that change immediately. With a 5 foot width the bed is probably pretty tight for 2 bikes, but if the bikes were staggered fore and aft, would probably be workable. By staggering you would have much better control of the loaded tongue weight. Zero tongue weight is not what you're after. 75 pounds would be much better.

I have a Kendon trailer set up for my wife's Silver Wing (scoot) and my Versys. It's superb. I tow it with my Dodge Journey 6 cyl (I think 3.6liter). Without the trailer it gets 26.5 mpg on the freeway and w the rig all loaded gets right at 20.0. From the drag generated by that attached ramp, you'd be money ahead to remove it and buy a ramp from cheapramps.com. The "equivalent flat plat area" of that ramp is probably larger that the entire car. My guess would be 2 mpg AT LEAST. Believe it or not, because the ramp is expanded mesh it probably generates more drag than solid sheet ( aero engineering major). In a thousand miles of towing it would cost you (@ $4/gal) about $22. The ramp costs like $80 iirc.

Towing a couple bikes is a PITA any way you cut it. In my case Amim Sahib (She-who-must-be obeyed) will not do extended slab transits. Thus to ride together anyplace fun I have to pull the bikes. Last year we went on 4 multi-day trips together, so I do quite a bit of towing. She makes the extra effort worth it shall we say....

Have fun !
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Old 03-05-2012, 08:31 AM   #22
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1200 miles isnt very far, like others have said, make sure the bearings are greased and correct tension and in 12" tires keep the air pressure to the sidewall rating. If it says 75 psi, make sure it's close to that. Get a spare or two, you will go thru 12" tires more quickly but you can buy a new tire mounted on a wheel for $50.


Fuel mileage depends on horsepower but as someone else posted, the tailgate is a killer on fuel mileage. Big horse engines wont be as effected as a small engine but you will see some difference for sure.
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Old 03-05-2012, 08:50 AM   #23
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I would say that you'll be ok but if I were you, I would make sure that I have insurance on the bikes :)
I have alot of experience with HarborFreight trailers. Right now i have this one:
http://www.harborfreight.com/1090-lb...res-90153.html

I installed a motorcycle rail from Northern Hydraulics on the trailer above. At the time the whole thing cost me less than $300. I've been using it for years to tow my CBR to and from the track. I've had the trailer at 75mph for extended periods of time without any issues. The trailer must have ~3,000 miles on it and I haven't had any issues except for some electrical stuff.
I have also owned the 4x8 harbor freight trailer. had that one for over 5 years. I put at least 10,000 miles on it..and I have loaded it way over capacity on a few occassions. Not saying that I would recommend it though. It only crapped out on me once because I forgot to grease the wheel bearings and one of them siezed up. I moved from NY to FL (and back) with that trailer and drove straight down only stopping for gas and food...never had any issues.

If you go with a cheaper trailer, definately get the 12' tires as well as a spare. Also make sure the bearings are well packed/greased. The trailer is going to be a little on the flimsy side but it's not like it's going to fall apart on you. At least none of mine have...yet
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Old 03-05-2012, 05:32 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SuchesTom View Post
It's fine, use 3/4 pressure treated plywood over floor if bikes hit between supports and sag expanded metal. Keep bearings greased and buy spare tire and wheel. Trailer comes with low end tires so change them early and it should work for years.

I've hauled on one like it a good bit with no problems.

Ditto. I have the same trailer and bolted a piece of treated plywood to the mesh floor (a heck of a lot lighter than 2x4 or 6es). I painted the wood with porch paint mixed with sand (a favorite non-skid trick that works awesome). The trailer has hauled quite a few things, (all at interstate speeds). I pull it with my Honda Van and yes gas mileage wil suffer when it's loaded. lately it brought home a k1200gt which aint a feather-weight . For the GT I did screw 2x4 pieces to each side of the tires to limit any sideways hopping. Keep a check on the straps and it's good to go. A mounted spare is only around $50.
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Old 03-07-2012, 06:34 AM   #25
kitesurfer
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if you're going with a cheap trailer, buy a harbor freight. put it together and re grease the bearings. too bad you are on the other coast. i'm selling mine. i had the landscape trailer people build one to specifically haul 2 bikes. 48' wide. it's solid! but now i'm riding a goldwiing and pulling a trailer vs pulling two bikes.
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Old 03-07-2012, 06:57 AM   #26
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I bought a lightweight 5x8 trailer and almost immediately wished I had bought a heavier 6x10. Someone got a deal on my 5-footer. Carry-on is a decent US company (local to me) but this is a budget line that I think they build for the big box stores. I'd move up the food chain a little bit to get something that will serve a wider need for a longer time.

Otherwise, YOU will be on Craigslist trying to sell this one for about half of what you have in it in order to buy what you should have bought in the first place. Buying used nets you more if you are patient. I have a yard full of open trailers from 3,000 lb. to 14,000 lb. capacity. The cheapest is a 6x10 single axle with wood floor, Trailer King tires, triangulated neck and I modified the "drag chute" so it folded over once rather than running deployed.

I disagree that trailers run better at rated weight. I find that trailers run best like alcoholics (about half-loaded). It is enough to settle the trailer but not testing its limits. Yes, I know they have safety factors but I'd much rather tow 1,800 lbs. on a 3,000 lb. trailer than on a 1,800 lb. trailer.
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Old 06-26-2012, 05:26 PM   #27
Libertynh
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The cheapest Lowes 5x8 is working fine for me.

I know this is an old post but this is where I came for info last year so in case anyone else is in the same boat I wanted to add my experience. Since I was towing with a Camry I needed something small and light and I had a small budget. With a couple of angle iron outriggers for tie-downs, a good sheet of plywood, a couple of wheel chocks and some good straps I now have over 7.5K towing two oilheads with absolutely no problems. It's really easy to load on the wide ramp too. I am glad for folks with bigger budgets and fancier stuff but we have had lots of fun riding places that would have not have worked out without this little rig.
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Old 06-27-2012, 07:30 AM   #28
bwringer
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SuchesTom View Post
It's fine, use 3/4 pressure treated plywood over floor if bikes hit between supports and sag expanded metal. Keep bearings greased and buy spare tire and wheel. Trailer comes with low end tires so change them early and it should work for years.

I've hauled on one like it a good bit with no problems.

Agreed -- it'll be fine. Throw down some 3/4 plywood and chocks, pay attention when you're strapping the bikes in and go. Repack the bearings and throw in a spare just in case. I have pretty much the same trailer and it has worked beautifully for many thousands of miles.

I swear, some of the dweebs around here strap on two condoms to go to the grocery store. In every trailer thread several people warn that you will perish horribly unless you use a duallie diesel with a 16,000 pound gooseneck trailer to haul two small bikes.
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