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Old 02-01-2013, 03:59 PM   #3946
RRVT
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Burnt orange color

Is burnt orange only available in US for the NTX model? I checked the Canadian MG site, it only lists black. The British site lists black and gray, the bikes look almost identical.
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Old 02-01-2013, 05:33 PM   #3947
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In the US for '13 it's Orange or Sexy Black.
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Old 02-01-2013, 05:53 PM   #3948
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pyoungbl View Post
In the US for '13 it's Orange or Sexy Black.
Maybe I didn't word it the best way. What I am really asking is whether USA is the only country where the NTX model is available in burnt orange. In Canada they only sell the black one, And it seems that in Europe NTX comes in black or grey, and the other (what they call ABS model) comes in orange, white and black.
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Old 02-01-2013, 06:17 PM   #3949
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MadMike20 View Post
Speaking of Traction Control, do the majority of NTX owners ride with the ATC on or off?
I picked up my 2013 NTX in December and have put about 500 miles on the bike both with ATC on and off.
Can't tell the difference when I have it on, so I just kept it off for no real reason.


Mike
I think that's the point - you shouldn't know it's there - until you need it and it saves your life, then it climbs back in its box and goes back to sleep. IMHO, turning off this bit of active safety technology - on the street at least - is plain dumb.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chuck in Indiana View Post
I'm 79 with a 31/32" inseam. I pretty well agree with what was said above. So far, I've ridden the NTX almost 5K miles and thoroughly enjoy it. What they say about the "soul and character" of a Guzzi bike is true. The ride is very different than anything I've ever experienced.
Ride safe.
You sir, are an inspiration; it would be a privilege to shake your hand and hear your tall (well, taller than me, anyhow) tales around a campfire sometime.
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Old 02-01-2013, 06:23 PM   #3950
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RRVT View Post
Maybe I didn't word it the best way. What I am really asking is whether USA is the only country where the NTX model is available in burnt orange. In Canada they only sell the black one, And it seems that in Europe NTX comes in black or grey, and the other (what they call ABS model) comes in orange, white and black.
In Aus, the Orange ones are "plain" Stelvios; the NTX only comes in primer; if you want it painted a colour, or shiny, that'll be extra, sir.
Although the Aus$ is stronger than the US$, we pay almost double what US riders do: even in flat primer, the stock NTX is deep in to the twenty-something thousands of dollars.
You don't see many - funny that....
Even given the smaller volumes and slightly greater distance from Mandello to Melbourne than Malibu (or wherever) I worked out that the Stelvio is about 45% over-priced here in Australia.
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Old 02-01-2013, 07:28 PM   #3951
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[QUOTE=Precis;20629976]I think that's the point - you shouldn't know it's there - until you need it and it saves your life, then it climbs back in its box and goes back to sleep. IMHO, turning off this bit of active safety technology - on the street at least - is plain dumb. QUOTE]

IMHO, relying on an electronic device to save your life is plain dumb. False sence of security. Pushes marginal riders to take more chances. Then they jump on a bike without ATC and say OH NO!
I'll keep mine on going forward...but to save my life? For that I'll rely on good humble riding skills that have taken me over the 200,000 mile mark without incident....all on non ATC bikes.
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Old 02-01-2013, 07:41 PM   #3952
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T.c.

I agree with Precis, it doesn't matter how many miles you have travelled or your past exprience you neuer know when it could save your life, or even a few scratches. The techno advances today are there to be used and must be considered a bonus.
I have a Tenere 1200 and find the electronics fantastic. I would love to look at a Stelvio but the closest dealer is hundreds of kiloms away, and the price as Precis said is way too high for a comparable bike
Just my two cents worth

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Old 02-01-2013, 07:53 PM   #3953
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rocker59 View Post
Look, if you are on the road and have a major breakdown on ANY motorcycle, it will mean the end of your trip.
This is why there is roadside assistance. Guzzi provides it for the first year after a new bike purchase, at least it did for me. I also joined the AMA and with automatic renewal the roadside assistance comes free. If you run out of gas they will bring you some, cost of delivery is covered, you pay for the gas. That might be helpful for all you pre-2011 Stelvio riders.
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Old 02-01-2013, 10:16 PM   #3954
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I think this is my first post on this forum.

I'm 3 months into my first Guzzi, a current model burnt orange standard (not NTX) Stelvio, which was bought by email from one of 3 Guzzi dealers in Perth Western Australia. (the only one I'd consider going to to buy and service -Thunderbikes. Mario has a worldwide reputation and only deals with Guzzis).

Had never ridden one before buying, but had ridden the first model Griso some years ago, and had sadly decided to pass. But ever since I'd had the hots for the concept of Guzzis, so after months of research I finally took the plunge (after agonising over the current Griso, which I think is sex on wheels).

But, the Stelvio ABS, prospect of sportsbike neck pain on a Griso, and traction control won the sensible argument.

And yes, in Australia Guzzis are a criminal price, but so are BuMWipes and Dukes. Who is pocketing all the 30 odd % extra price over what people pay in UK, Europe and the Americas?????

Do I love the beast after 3,000km (about 2,000 miles)?

No. But I'm getting there. Yes it is heavy (especially after a Kwaka W800), top heavy and a bit awkward at low speed or pushing it around, but not nearly as much as my FJR1300 was ( I hated it. Bloody aircraft carrier). Yes, going in for fuel in a greasy servo needs a bit of careful foot placement, and parking needs some focus.

But once you move off, it becomes light as a feather, and soooooo easy. I've never had such beautiful handling, fabulous cornering, easy take-off, magical brakes, great compression braking, comfortable seating, sublime gearchanges, and lovely grunt. I've also come to admire the looks very much (though it still ain't a Griso).

So what's not to love?

1. Harsh suspension, which I'm still toying with. The standard settings are fine on good surfaces, but the front is really hard on any corrugations. Having said that, it is sooo confidence-building on corners and there is absolutely NO wallowing on sweepers when you hit a bump, something I've never had on any bike before. Bliss.

2. Appalling standard screen which makes your eyeballs rattle from turbulence, and deafens you even through earplugs (now partially fixed by a little Vario attachment screen).

3.On-off throttle at low speeds which I'm learning to anticipate and work around on the tar, but which makes traffic dribbling a bit of a chore, and standing on the pegs on gravel and corrugations incredibly tiring at the low speeds I'm brave enough to try (every bump is transferred to the throttle hand and you jerk on-off-on-off. It's easier to be smooth if you stay sitting down but our gravel roads have ball-bearing pebbles, so standing is far more controllable)

4. The vibe from 3.5 to 4k revs, that takes a while to get to you but you certainly feel in your hands after about 200 miles, but I'm learning that the engine seems to be happier at 4.5-5k anyway.

My longest day trip has been about 250 miles so far, but over mostly fairly narrow winding roads with not the smoothest of surfaces. I've come home in far better shape than I ever have on another bike.

Is this a great bike? YESSSS!

Is it perfect? NO! But I think it beats a GS.

That's my 2c worth
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Old 02-01-2013, 10:42 PM   #3955
stevie88
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nextmove View Post
I think this is my first post on this forum.

I'm 3 months into my first Guzzi, a current model burnt orange standard (not NTX) Stelvio, which was bought by email from one of 3 Guzzi dealers in Perth Western Australia. (the only one I'd consider going to to buy and service -Thunderbikes. Mario has a worldwide reputation and only deals with Guzzis).

Had never ridden one before buying, but had ridden the first model Griso some years ago, and had sadly decided to pass. But ever since I'd had the hots for the concept of Guzzis, so after months of research I finally took the plunge (after agonising over the current Griso, which I think is sex on wheels).

But, the Stelvio ABS, prospect of sportsbike neck pain on a Griso, and traction control won the sensible argument.

And yes, in Australia Guzzis are a criminal price, but so are BuMWipes and Dukes. Who is pocketing all the 30 odd % extra price over what people pay in UK, Europe and the Americas?????

Do I love the beast after 3,000km (about 2,000 miles)?

No. But I'm getting there. Yes it is heavy (especially after a Kwaka W800), top heavy and a bit awkward at low speed or pushing it around, but not nearly as much as my FJR1300 was ( I hated it. Bloody aircraft carrier). Yes, going in for fuel in a greasy servo needs a bit of careful foot placement, and parking needs some focus.

But once you move off, it becomes light as a feather, and soooooo easy. I've never had such beautiful handling, fabulous cornering, easy take-off, magical brakes, great compression braking, comfortable seating, sublime gearchanges, and lovely grunt. I've also come to admire the looks very much (though it still ain't a Griso).

So what's not to love?

1. Harsh suspension, which I'm still toying with. The standard settings are fine on good surfaces, but the front is really hard on any corrugations. Having said that, it is sooo confidence-building on corners and there is absolutely NO wallowing on sweepers when you hit a bump, something I've never had on any bike before. Bliss.

2. Appalling standard screen which makes your eyeballs rattle from turbulence, and deafens you even through earplugs (now partially fixed by a little Vario attachment screen).

3.On-off throttle at low speeds which I'm learning to anticipate and work around on the tar, but which makes traffic dribbling a bit of a chore, and standing on the pegs on gravel and corrugations incredibly tiring at the low speeds I'm brave enough to try (every bump is transferred to the throttle hand and you jerk on-off-on-off. It's easier to be smooth if you stay sitting down but our gravel roads have ball-bearing pebbles, so standing is far more controllable)

4. The vibe from 3.5 to 4k revs, that takes a while to get to you but you certainly feel in your hands after about 200 miles, but I'm learning that the engine seems to be happier at 4.5-5k anyway.

My longest day trip has been about 250 miles so far, but over mostly fairly narrow winding roads with not the smoothest of surfaces. I've come home in far better shape than I ever have on another bike.

Is this a great bike? YESSSS!

Is it perfect? NO! But I think it beats a GS.

That's my 2c worth
Nice write up. I just did back to back 400 mile days at fairly high speeds on my new NTX and I know it beats the 08 GSA I used to own in every meaningful way. At 90+mph it feels like it really isn't working hard at all and a simple twist of the wrist gives you more speed very easily. The stock seat works remarkably well, if I stand up on the bike I'm in a perfect position. I don't have to stoop to hold the grips.
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stevie88 screwed with this post 02-02-2013 at 08:14 AM
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Old 02-02-2013, 06:36 PM   #3956
James Adams
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I just replaced my fork seals today. Not a really tough job once you figure out what you're doing.

I used 10wt fork oil instead of the recommended 7.5wt and it's an improvement.
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Old 02-03-2013, 04:43 AM   #3957
Precis
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[QUOTE=MadMike20;20630545]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Precis View Post
I think that's the point - you shouldn't know it's there - until you need it and it saves your life, then it climbs back in its box and goes back to sleep. IMHO, turning off this bit of active safety technology - on the street at least - is plain dumb. QUOTE]

IMHO, relying on an electronic device to save your life is plain dumb. False sence of security. Pushes marginal riders to take more chances. Then they jump on a bike without ATC and say OH NO!
I'll keep mine on going forward...but to save my life? For that I'll rely on good humble riding skills that have taken me over the 200,000 mile mark without incident....all on non ATC bikes.
Once you're over about 32 years old, your reflexes will begin to slow down; when you reach 40, it's not just your reflexes, but also the physical speed at which your body can react; once you're into the mid-to-late 40s, you lose the sbility to instantly shift focus and will start to need glasses to read. A while later, you become naturally more far-sighted...
None of these milestones in life will improve your ability to IPDE to a situation. Quite the opposite.

Those "humble riding skills" you rely on will deteriorate gradually, but inexorably. At just 200,000 miles experience, you're still a relative newcomer and obviously still quite young - otherwise, you'd have noticed a few things that once were instinctive now take a nano-second longer.
It'd the reason older guys stop racing (and that's the best way to hone those reflexes and riding skills!) and why pilots LISTEN to what their doctors tell 'em at those mandatory annual medicals.

And, it's not "relying" on electronic devices to stay alive - my cars all have a slew of airbags and a host of safety acronyms, but I've never deployed a bag and only very seldom invoke any of the grip-enhancers - but like a good insurance policy, it's nice to know they're there if someone else does something dumb that could harm me or mine.

On another tack, buying a bike (or car) which has factory-fitted active safety systems and then habitually switching them off for all applications is - if nothing else - a waste of money; and dumb.

I learned to ride on cable-operated drum brakes, cross-ply tyres and 6v electrics - the only reason to still do so is nostalgia.

Thinking that you can IPDE faster than a computer is either arrogant or delusional. Pick one - either will get you killed.
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Old 02-03-2013, 05:34 AM   #3958
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[QUOTE=Precis;20638949]
Quote:
Originally Posted by MadMike20 View Post

Once you're over about 32 years old, your reflexes will begin to slow down; when you reach 40, it's not just your reflexes, but also the physical speed at which your body can react; once you're into the mid-to-late 40s, you lose the sbility to instantly shift focus and will start to need glasses to read. A while later, you become naturally more far-sighted...
None of these milestones in life will improve your ability to IPDE to a situation. Quite the opposite.

Those "humble riding skills" you rely on will deteriorate gradually, but inexorably. At just 200,000 miles experience, you're still a relative newcomer and obviously still quite young - otherwise, you'd have noticed a few things that once were instinctive now take a nano-second longer.
It'd the reason older guys stop racing (and that's the best way to hone those reflexes and riding skills!) and why pilots LISTEN to what their doctors tell 'em at those mandatory annual medicals.

And, it's not "relying" on electronic devices to stay alive - my cars all have a slew of airbags and a host of safety acronyms, but I've never deployed a bag and only very seldom invoke any of the grip-enhancers - but like a good insurance policy, it's nice to know they're there if someone else does something dumb that could harm me or mine.

On another tack, buying a bike (or car) which has factory-fitted active safety systems and then habitually switching them off for all applications is - if nothing else - a waste of money; and dumb.

I learned to ride on cable-operated drum brakes, cross-ply tyres and 6v electrics - the only reason to still do so is nostalgia.

Thinking that you can IPDE faster than a computer is either arrogant or delusional. Pick one - either will get you killed.

Dumb, Delusional, Arrogant...sure is fun getting in a pissing contest with you. Nonetheless, I purchased the bike and the ATC was off...never really could tell the difference when the ATC was turned on. Asked the forum what the their experience was and form now on will have it turned on. I get it now. Done deal.

Question though...with your litany of benefits regarding computer aided riding devises...how is it you haven't gone running and screaming to a dealer, and purchased a bike that has ATC, rain modes, sport modes, torque vectoring or whatever the hell else they put on bikes these days? My mistake if you your Capanord has all these gizmos's.
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Old 02-03-2013, 05:49 AM   #3959
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Interesting conversation about safety systems in bikes. In my last bike I choose a non abs system, both were available on the bike . That goes against popular wisdom. I had a pretty valid reason for choosing the non abs system. Never having had abs on any bike and switching off on several bikes I felt it was, in my case, better to have one technique rather than two in extreme braking situations. I considered how unfortunate it might be if in such a situation I confused which machine I was riding and locked up the brakes on my non abs bike. So I went with what I knew and I was never sorry. Of course I heard all the wise me tell me how ABS has just saved their lives and how they were so thankful for ABS. One after on they went on to say how they avoided a collision and ABS saved their ass... Now that sounds about right... ABS can save your ass... and now the other shoe drops...
Sure the system can be useful, first you need to know how to use it and trust it. But what I noticed was so many ABS stories and how this technology saved their lives, why? Why were they not looking well down the road, scanning for situations that might require a panic stop? Why did so many guys NEED ABS to save their lives? Oh, and I'm 58 and my hands and mind still function well enough.

I have no idea if Traction control or ABS will save my life someday. Anything is possible. I could have gone down many times, I guess it was an angel on my shoulder that saved me in those situations?

I'm not counting on ABS or Traction Control to save my life. I'l planning on riding the best I can and using what little wits I've left in my aging head to avoid situations where I need to use these systems. Yep, sometimes you just dont get warning... Knowing that also makes to a bit safer, at least I think so...and I'm too old to know better...

Your mileage may vary

vivo
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Old 02-03-2013, 06:51 AM   #3960
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Hey guys, I just want to derail this discussion before it gets so far. The ABS and TC on the Stelvio are on par with other bikes, so let's move this inevitable debate over to a more appropriate venue like the perfect line and save this thread for Stelvio-specific discussion.
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