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Old 02-18-2013, 08:13 AM   #54166
my6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sierra Thumper View Post
I have a quick suggestion......some folks won't agree, but I'd avoid piling too much money into it..unless you plan on keeping it forever
The xrl is a great bike for its intended purpose, and some reasonable mods make it a much nicer machine, but when you start getting enough money into it to match a nice used KTM or the like, you'll start losing money fast, because you'll never be able to get anywhere near that kind of money back out of it come selling time. Its a great bang for the buck bike, but don't turn it into a moneypile unless you plan on keeping it permanently Gotta keep your head about these things
That being said with the right mods you may never want to sell it
Well said and some excellent food for thought when playing with our scoots. When I went looking for my "L" I did what a lot of people do, I looked for one where the PO had spent the bucks on what I concider the big buck items. Large tank, upgraded carb and better exhaust etc...
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Old 02-18-2013, 09:17 AM   #54167
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Originally Posted by purpledrake View Post
Hey guys,

Here is a thought provoking comment from Miguel Sanchez (cut & pasted from Ulyses' Ushuaia RR). What is your opinion?



I have a good chain slider on right now, so there is no new chewing on the swing arm, but the slider was completely trashed when I bought the bike. Does the aggressive sprocket (14/48) cause early deterioration of the slider (when compared to the stock 15/45)? If so, then wouldn't chain tensioning resolve the problem?
Maybe my sag is just set too high/low/saggy, but even with a 13t I think my chain clears the top slider when I am sitting on the bike.
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Old 02-18-2013, 09:20 AM   #54168
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As for dumping too much cash into the L, I don't think that's possible. That's why the L is so great. From $1500 runner, to Wattner's CW powered beauty, they all work well at their respective levels. I have ridden a KTM690 and while I liked the motor and front brake, the rest of the bike didn't work for me very well. My beast rides great loaded up with my Dirt Bagz and my Wolfman Duffle. The moto bikes with blinkers (I love moto bikes, don't get me wrong) don't carry weight for shit. So yes, if your end goal is to ride a bike with blinkers to your local OHV or trail network and you want to get a little whip off the down hill water bar, don't dump $3K into your L. Otherwise, keep spending $.
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Old 02-18-2013, 09:41 AM   #54169
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Originally Posted by mendoteach View Post
As for dumping too much cash into the L, I don't think that's possible. That's why the L is so great. From $1500 runner, to Wattner's CW powered beauty, they all work well at their respective levels. I have ridden a KTM690 and while I liked the motor and front brake, the rest of the bike didn't work for me very well. My beast rides great loaded up with my Dirt Bagz and my Wolfman Duffle. The moto bikes with blinkers (I love moto bikes, don't get me wrong) don't carry weight for shit. So yes, if your end goal is to ride a bike with blinkers to your local OHV or trail network and you want to get a little whip off the down hill water bar, don't dump $3K into your L. Otherwise, keep spending $.
Modify until it cant be modified no more. I feel these are the best do all DS bikes ever built. Yes it is older technology, but with that comes bullet proof reliability. Being that these bikes have been around unchanged for so long affords a person the ability to upgrade any weak point you may have with the bike but keep the bullet proof core. You can make these bikes better than any modern bike IMHO.
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Old 02-18-2013, 09:44 AM   #54170
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ulyses View Post
It is from an XR650R!

This makes me think that since I've been running with the countersprocket on backwards for the last 5,000 miles, it has been pulling the chain at an odd angle, which is why my chain slider is destroyed and my chain is all jacked up. I feel dumb.
Well put me in that category too. I've probably got a thousand miles on mine installed backwards. I've got to change it before I ride it again.
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Old 02-18-2013, 09:56 AM   #54171
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Too much cash? A money pit? Yes on both... But I would spend even more on a KTM as the parts are not as readily available and more expensive. I shop smart too, so I manage to letup costs down. If I had a newer bike, I would also be in a lot deeper on the initial investment.
My USD swap is a good example... I waited to find a decent set of forks for practically nothing and ended up making a few bucks on the deal after I sold off the xr parts. Now I have a front wheel that is really available and can be had for a song on ebay instead of the rather rare, pricey xr wheel.
Ymmv
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Old 02-18-2013, 10:03 AM   #54172
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Originally Posted by JWhitmore44 View Post
The type of riding you plan on doing can make a difference on what you may want to do with your suspension. A couple of things you can do to your forks before you spend big bucks is, as some one has said before, add heavier fork oil. You can also put a spacer made out of PVC pipe, about 1/2 to 3/4 inch long, and place it on top of the springs to add some preload. lastly, add a fork brace. This all keeps the ride a bit cushy, lessens the front end dive on breaking, and keeps the front wheel from deflecting. Now if you plan and getting the bike air borne a lot or hammer corners hard and canyon racing, then you'll probably want to consider a USD conversion :)

Actually, the type of riding will probably dictate what kind of mods you want to add.If you are doing mostly trails and back roads and very little black top then a 48 tooth rear sprocket is a good choice and then tun a 15 or 14 CS sprocket depending on how slow you want to go. I find my self on gravel roads, jeep trails, some quad or single track trails and quite a bit of blacktop in between and I prefer the 15/45 combo. But it's open and flat around here so even the two lane highway it's easy to run 70 to 75. If you are trail riding you may be looking at trimming weight, I think there is a whole thread on dropping weight of the XRL. If you plan on doing some camping or traveling then you will want a rear rack and probably some sub frame supports. Check out manracks for those items.

As tall as you are you'll probably find the bars a bit low and the position a bit cramped. Some bar riser and high bend bars help a lot in bot setting and standing position. You can typically go 2 inch risers with high bend bars without changing cables, although I found my clutch cable to be just a little short with the bars locked clear to the right. Wider foot pegs will give you a better platform for your feet. You don't have to go expensive as there are some economical ones on ebay that work good.
with the exhaust baffle you said "Keep in mind that will only work with FCR-MX carbs not the Gen 1 carb" how do you know what one you have?
I plan on mostly doing logging roads and trails in capital forest and maybe a few things like thee wabdr. I have the harley for running the street.
im thinking maybe going to the 48 in rear and leaving the 15 in the front for trails. but switching to xrr 15 tooth

marlinjames screwed with this post 02-18-2013 at 10:09 AM
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Old 02-18-2013, 10:04 AM   #54173
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ThumpnRed View Post
Too much cash? A money pit? Yes on both... But I would spend even more on a KTM as the parts are not as readily available and more expensive. I shop smart too, so I manage to letup costs down. If I had a newer bike, I would also be in a lot deeper on the initial investment.
My USD swap is a good example... I waited to find a decent set of forks for practically nothing and ended up making a few bucks on the deal after I sold off the xr parts. Now I have a front wheel that is really available and can be had for a song on ebay instead of the rather rare, pricey xr wheel.
Ymmv
Very true. I crash and break things then I can buy them cheap of CL or Ebay and replace. Modern bikes cost a fortune when something breaks. I have seen many people buy the latest and greatest and say that they have found their end all bike, only to blow it up and move on two years later. Imagine how much that costs.
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Old 02-18-2013, 10:07 AM   #54174
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Now is probably a good time to remind everyone; mount the XR650R C/S sprocket backwards.

Quote:
Originally Posted by alvincullumyork View Post
How far off is the alignment is you put the XRR CS sprocket on like this? I have had it on like this for a day and will fix it before I go any further.

The photograph above shows the XR650R C/S sprocket mounted incorrectly on an XR650L. The misalignment more than doubles from 2.5mm outwards to 5.1 mm inwards if you don't mount the XR650R C/S sprocket "backwards."



The following photograph shows the correct way to install the wider, XR650R C/S sprocket onto the XR650L countershaft.



Spud
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Old 02-18-2013, 10:17 AM   #54175
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Quote:
Originally Posted by XR650L_Dave View Post
Maybe my sag is just set too high/low/saggy, but even with a 13t I think my chain clears the top slider when I am sitting on the bike.
The smaller the countershaft sprocket the closer the chain is to the swing arm.
If the bike is lowered, not as much of an issue as the lower ride height moves the chain up away from the swing arm.
Proper chain adjustment is a big factor in keeping the chain off the swing arm.
Additionally bigger sprockets reduce chain wear as the chain does not deflect as sharply around a big sprocket as it does around a small one.
Best mechanical advantage is achived with the most reduction closest to the point of load ( ie; the rear wheel ).
So a big sprocket at the wheel is best for a lot of reasons but changing the counterhsaft sprocket is quicker.
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Old 02-18-2013, 10:23 AM   #54176
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ADV BUM View Post

My bike


By the way, that is one beautiful bike. I really like the blue (helmet, too).
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Old 02-18-2013, 10:27 AM   #54177
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spud Rider View Post
Now is probably a good time to remind everyone; mount the XR650R C/S sprocket backwards.



The photograph above shows the XR650R C/S sprocket mounted incorrectly on an XR650L. The misalignment more than doubles from 2.5mm outwards to 5.1 mm inwards if you don't mount the XR650R C/S sprocket "backwards."



The following photograph shows the correct way to install the wider, XR650R C/S sprocket onto the XR650L countershaft.



Spud
I really hate to opine on this or sound like an ass, but hey...

how in Gods name is this not obvious? it takes but a second to look at the chain from the rear of the bike...you look, look at chain see its straight if not you have either side chain snail adjusters, if something is amiss then its the new fandangled xr650r sprocket you JUST put on...

If you cant see this then just use knobbies on the street at 18psi and never deal wih worn countershafts and the like, you can also just buy a KUSH sprocket or even better a RAD hub.

cheers guys
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Old 02-18-2013, 10:51 AM   #54178
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fritzcoinc View Post
The smaller the countershaft sprocket the closer the chain is to the swing arm.
If the bike is lowered, not as much of an issue as the lower ride height moves the chain up away from the swing arm.
Proper chain adjustment is a big factor in keeping the chain off the swing arm.
Additionally bigger sprockets reduce chain wear as the chain does not deflect as sharply around a big sprocket as it does around a small one.
Best mechanical advantage is achived with the most reduction closest to the point of load ( ie; the rear wheel ).
So a big sprocket at the wheel is best for a lot of reasons but changing the counterhsaft sprocket is quicker.
Indeed, the photograph below shows a 13T C/S sprocket installed on my XR650L. When I took this photograph I had the stock, 45T sprocket installed on the rear wheel.



Note how the drive chain is not forced against the chain slider, even with the 13T/45T sprocket combination. However, it's important to note I had also installed a Performance Design lowering link, which lowered the saddle height 1.5-inches.

In effect, lowering the saddle height 1.5-inches raises the travel of the rear wheel almost the same height, and reduces the angle of the swingarm relative to the C/S sprocket. The net result is equivalent to using a much larger rear sprocket, which would also raise the top of the chain 1.5-inches. Installing a lowering link definitely helps to preserve the chain slider.

Properly adjusting the drive chain also helps to preserve the chain slider. To preserve the countershaft bearing as well as the chain slider, it is better to have the drive chain slightly too loose, rather than slightly too tight.

Also, as Fritz stated, larger sprockets increase the longevity of the drive chain as well as the chain slider. Therefore, it is better to install a 14T/48T sprocket combination instead of a 13T/45T sprocket combination. Both of these sprocket combinations produce the same gear ratio, but the 14T/48T sprocket combination will increase the longevity of both the drive chain and the chain slider.

Finally, chain lubrication which doesn't attact dirt will also increase the lifespan of both drive chain and chain slider.

Spud
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Old 02-18-2013, 10:56 AM   #54179
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keep up the good work spud!!!!!
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Old 02-18-2013, 11:07 AM   #54180
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Originally Posted by elsalvadorklr View Post
keep up the good work spud!!!!!
Thank you, Christian.

Spud
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