ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Bikes > Orange Crush
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 04-28-2008, 01:40 PM   #61
highlandcycles
Gnarly Adventurer
 
highlandcycles's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2008
Location: Montrose, Colorado
Oddometer: 358
Docking pilot, when was that letter written and when was all of this testing done? I really don't care that much but when a guy who builds race motors for one of the most successful race teams in NASCAR says that redline is better and that all of the teams are using it, I sort of believe him over some scientist in a lab. Also he has nothing to gain by telling me this so it isn't some sort of sales pitch. Like my first post said though, just change the stuff and it doesn't matter what you use. I am sure that amsoil is good, but I will stick with redline.
__________________
Ni Siochain Go Saoirse

VIVA LOS MTNADS

www.highland-cycles.com
Highland Cycles
Montrose, CO
970-240-2197
highlandcycles is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2008, 02:21 PM   #62
DockingPilot
Hooked Up and Hard Over
 
DockingPilot's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2004
Location: Andover, N.J.
Oddometer: 8,469
Quote:
Originally Posted by emelgee
Amsoil?? Never heard of it - I guess it's a US brand. Probably fine for weatherproofing fence panels and garden furnature, but for the best lubrication I prefer Fuchs Silkolene 10W50 fully synt. It's red, so it's gotta be good.
Hey, we have pretty good fences over this side of the pond ya know !
__________________
Frank Reinbold

"Every bike I ever had, was the best bike I ever had, when I had it"
DockingPilot is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2008, 02:23 PM   #63
DockingPilot
Hooked Up and Hard Over
 
DockingPilot's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2004
Location: Andover, N.J.
Oddometer: 8,469
Quote:
Originally Posted by highlandcycles
Docking pilot, when was that letter written and when was all of this testing done? I really don't care that much but when a guy who builds race motors for one of the most successful race teams in NASCAR says that redline is better and that all of the teams are using it, I sort of believe him over some scientist in a lab. Also he has nothing to gain by telling me this so it isn't some sort of sales pitch. Like my first post said though, just change the stuff and it doesn't matter what you use. I am sure that amsoil is good, but I will stick with redline.
Of course, all good stuff, just stoking the fire.
__________________
Frank Reinbold

"Every bike I ever had, was the best bike I ever had, when I had it"
DockingPilot is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2008, 05:08 PM   #64
highlandcycles
Gnarly Adventurer
 
highlandcycles's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2008
Location: Montrose, Colorado
Oddometer: 358
Hey, how do you get the quote from the last guy in that cute little box?
__________________
Ni Siochain Go Saoirse

VIVA LOS MTNADS

www.highland-cycles.com
Highland Cycles
Montrose, CO
970-240-2197
highlandcycles is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2008, 05:16 PM   #65
DockingPilot
Hooked Up and Hard Over
 
DockingPilot's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2004
Location: Andover, N.J.
Oddometer: 8,469
You hit the "qoute" button on the bottom right hand cornor of his post.
__________________
Frank Reinbold

"Every bike I ever had, was the best bike I ever had, when I had it"
DockingPilot is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2008, 05:47 PM   #66
highlandcycles
Gnarly Adventurer
 
highlandcycles's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2008
Location: Montrose, Colorado
Oddometer: 358
Quote:
Originally Posted by DockingPilot
You hit the "qoute" button on the bottom right hand cornor of his post.
cool thanks
__________________
Ni Siochain Go Saoirse

VIVA LOS MTNADS

www.highland-cycles.com
Highland Cycles
Montrose, CO
970-240-2197
highlandcycles is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-18-2008, 05:31 PM   #67
motogazonaktm
Adventurer
 
motogazonaktm's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2008
Location: Darwin
Oddometer: 70
A bit of tech stuff about oils

Found this on the Motul website under Fact sheets, i was wondering about ester technology etc.

Bit clearer now.


Hydrodynamic
Lubrication
Boundary
Lubrication
Ad Molecule Film
ESTER OIL
Under normal conditions, oil forms a continuous film between two surfaces. This oil film provides hydrodynamic lubrication as it prevents direct metal-to-metal contact thereby reducing friction.

The ability to maintain a continuous layer of oil between two metal surfaces is an important attribute of an engine oil to provide fluid lubricity. Friction and wear result when this lubricant film is broken under high load conditions. This is where Esters excel in providing boundary lubrication. Ester has the propensity to reduce friction where other base oils fail.

Ester's molecules: consist of Oxygen (O), which has a positive polarity, and Hydrogen (H), which has a negative polarity. These two molecules electrically adsorb onto the metal surfaces and form a layer known as ad molecule film. It is this ad molecule film that makes Esters stand out from other oils (where film is created by viscosity).

The difference is obvious in its lubrication performance when starting the engine. With oils that depend on viscosity for film strength, pressure and oil will drop when the engine stops. When the engine is restarted, the film between the two metals no longer exists and this results to a dry start. Ad molecule film on the other hand, does not rely on viscosity for fluid lubrication. Therefore it is able to continuously lubricate between the two metals even if the engine stops.

In city driving, where there are frequent start and stop, these car engines are subjected to more stress than in racing. It is therefore more critical that the appropriate engine oil is chosen to protect car engines.

MOTUL uses Ester as base oil for its 4-stroke and 2-stroke engine oils.
Comparison Chart
ESTER AS BASE OIL FOR SYNTHETIC OIL
Before the introduction of Esters, the choice of base oils was based on its ability to control viscosity. It was thought then, that the thicker the oil the better it would be.

By employing Esters as the base for synthetic oil, MOTUL changed the conventional concept of synthetic lubricants. Esters are polar molecules that have the ability to electro-chemically bond with metals, so as to maintain a continuous lubricant film at high or low temperatures.

After experimenting with a variety of Esters, MOTUL selected Complex Esters in 1996 as its latest generation of base oils. Complex Esters have increased adsorption ability thereby making higher performance synthetic oils.
motogazonaktm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-18-2008, 06:04 PM   #68
Jody H
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Mar 2008
Location: New Mexico
Oddometer: 395
Repsol 4T Racing 100% synthetic 15w-50
All my street bikes love the stuff.
__________________
'07 Aprilia Tuono
'07 Aprilia RXV 4.5
'07 KTM 990 Adventure
'09 Aprilia Mana
Jody H is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2008, 07:57 AM   #69
Bill English
ICUUCME
 
Joined: May 2008
Location: Santa Cruz Mountains
Oddometer: 247
Wink There's no bottom line, no free lunch...


Comment on break in:
When the engine is fresh out of the factory there are inevitably metal surfaces that have not been machined to a perfect #1 uinch polish. It's not practical. Nor has every part been machined perfectly flat, oval, circlular, etc,.. I.E., the mating of parts is never perfect in terms of factors other than surface finish, ex: Runout, etc,... Thus certain surfaces need to "break in", and it's important to allow the moving surfaces to mate but not necessarily to abrade. The physics of abrasion are certainly different than providing a "slurry" of material that polishes, kin to chemical mechanical planarization. The abrasion that happens as a matter of "seating" is necessary to remove small peaks on the contact surfaces and this allows for tighter more consistent stroke or rotation. This should happen at the widest range of rotation and frequency. Material will come loose because of a variety of mechanisms. Surfaces that are honed will polish. And hopefully, the loose material will quickly get into the filtration system. To think that it's necessary to have pieces of metal floating around during break in is not logical. Particles that manage to get in between bearing surfaces cause damage, not anything good.
So this goes back to the synthetic versus conventional petroleum products during break in. Consider the physics of mechanical wear as stated above and then ask yourself what the consequence of using either lubricant are during break in. Synthetics tend to hold up better at high heat. It doesn't mean that one is necessarily more slippery or prevents proper break in. Furthermore, consider graphite or Teflon products.
A couple of posts ago the guy refers to Ester based oil. The most advanced synthetics use Ester based performance. Look up class of oils 1 through 5...
In general, synthetics are clearly more robust over longer periods of operation at higher temperatures. Having said that, the main difference between these higher performance motorcycle oils versus what you'd put in your 4-wheeled hot rod has to do with the fact most motorcycles have a clutch that uses the engine oil. Motorcycle oils tend to lack additives that increase lubricity, hence affects your clutch,... unless you have a dry sump/ run separate oil. They also tend to have higher ratio of detergents.
If you are racing and take your engine apart all the time perhaps you should be concerned. If you are part of the mainstream biker crowd then it's more important to change regularly. If you can afford to do whatever you want,... well there's no one but you that knows the answer.
__________________
"If you build it,... they will come"
Bill English is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2008, 07:57 AM   #70
Bill English
ICUUCME
 
Joined: May 2008
Location: Santa Cruz Mountains
Oddometer: 247
Wink There's no bottom line, no free lunch...

Correction:
"factors including surface finish, ex: Runout, etc,..."
__________________
"If you build it,... they will come"
Bill English is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2008, 10:39 AM   #71
wingysataday
Studly Adventurer
 
wingysataday's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2007
Location: Boise, ID
Oddometer: 584
I was told by a friend that diesel oil is the best cause it has all the goodies in it and is great for your clutch? anyone know?
__________________
05' 450exc dual sport farkled to the max.
Catholicscomehome.org
wingysataday is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2008, 11:32 AM   #72
XJCoupe
smells gasoline burnin'
 
Joined: Feb 2008
Location: Ann Arbor, Mich.
Oddometer: 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by wingysataday
I was told by a friend that diesel oil is the best cause it has all the goodies in it and is great for your clutch? anyone know?
You want to avoid the high levels of molybdenum that are found in "Energy Conserving" automotive oils, which can cause (wet) clutch slippage. I wouldn't take that as being great for your clutch -- just not bad for it. There are, of course, other differences with oils designed for gasoline engines. There's virtually endless reading about engine oil on the Internet, but this is a decent place to start:
http://www.calsci.com/motorcycleinfo/Oils1.html
__________________
'04 KTM 950 Adventure
XJCoupe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2008, 12:32 PM   #73
pburke
Talks more than he rides
 
pburke's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2006
Location: Madison, Wisconsin
Oddometer: 995
Quote:
Originally Posted by wingysataday
I was told by a friend that diesel oil is the best cause it has all the goodies in it and is great for your clutch? anyone know?
I've been using that Rotella T diesel stuff (semi synth) for two years now. $17 for a gallon, changed often, no problems with the clutch. If you think you have clutch problems, make sure the jet is clean and the right size (there was an upgrade to a larger size I had to install, and suddenly all my cold clutch slipping issues went away)

The part # for the oil jet is 6003802900
pburke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2008, 02:37 PM   #74
K2m
....58....
 
K2m's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2005
Location: Sydney Australia
Oddometer: 2,242
Still running Dino 15/40. $70 per 20lt. Clutch works perfect. Change every 5,000km. Run it in my Turbo Subi as well. A bit heavy in the gearbox of my Gasgas 300 two stroke. So I run ATF in that @ about the same price. Clutches luv ATF.

Occasionally a week before an oil change I dump 250ml(Bike) to 500ml (Car) of ATF into the engine oil to add extra detergent to the engine oil to give the engine a good clean. Works for me
__________________
The News, those who are trying to control what we think, do not want us to see.
http://www.presstv.ir/live.html So good the British Gov. Banned it !!!
http://rt.com/on-air/rt-america-air/

K2m screwed with this post 08-21-2008 at 09:24 PM
K2m is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2008, 09:24 PM   #75
K2m
....58....
 
K2m's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2005
Location: Sydney Australia
Oddometer: 2,242
Quote:
Originally Posted by MortimerSickle
I thought ATF already had a much higher detergent content than did motor oil.

No?
I have re written that to make more sense.... sorry. You are right
__________________
The News, those who are trying to control what we think, do not want us to see.
http://www.presstv.ir/live.html So good the British Gov. Banned it !!!
http://rt.com/on-air/rt-america-air/
K2m is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 05:50 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014