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Old 01-14-2007, 12:00 PM   #1
Teeds OP
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Location: 427 miles ENE of Orla Texas
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MEXadventure 2007: The Intervention

Building the foundation for the report ...

Like many of the rides reported on in this forum, this ride started quietly one evening over a drink last spring ...

Why donít we go to Mexico?
Sounds like fun to me.
Me to.
Me three.
When?
Dang, I would really like to go, but donít get any vacation until January and can only use one week for the trip.
Ok, well how about January and we do ... say 9 days, which is a work week plus the weekends.
Cool!

With that, informal planning took over and a general route was proposed and a thread posted on TWT about the ride.

The route:

Who was it that originally described the "Great Circle Route"?
Well, this wasnít THAT great circle route, but it was ambitious from the very beginning ...

Day One - Presidio, Texas/Ojinaga, Chihuahua to Creel, Chihuahua
Day Two - Creel, Chihuahua to Los Mochis, Sinaloa (via Batopilas)
Night Two - The Midnight Ferry to La Paz, Baja California Sur
Day Three - La Paz, Baja California Sur to Mulegť, Baja California Sur
Day Four - Mulegť, Baja California Sur to Mikeís Sky Ranch, Baja California Norte
Day Five - Mikeís Sky Ranch, Baja California Norte to Douglas, Arizona
Day Six - Douglas, Arizona to El Paso, Texas
Day Seven - El Paso, Texas to Presidio, Texas

Stop laughing!!

To complicate things a bit further, the post on TWT yielded 14 people interested in the trip and willing to sign on. Now logistics became a huge issue. For those that have ever been in the military, they well understand the logistics of movement of large groups and often every attempt begins with ... hurry up and wait.

This is the reason for choosing the name "intervention" for the ride. As you will learn from our noble attempt, intervention became the watch word for planning and executing this effort. Never one to shirk from adventure, the intrepid band of merry adventurers slogged forward into the darkness, only barely aware that poop could hit the fan at any moment.

Many of us geared up for the ride by reading the many epic adventures chronicled in the annals of Adventure Rider and more particularly, the adventures of Gaspipe and Big Dog. Cognizant that everyone on ADV had many more adventures than we under their belts, we absorbed, like little sponges, the wisdom gleaned from the ride reports.

Intervention One -

The route always looked to be ambitious beyond belief to me, and I lobbied for dropping the Baja leg from the beginning. The hurricanes in Baja, reality that many towns would be unable to take care of 16 ... oops, the group had grown from 14 ... and the fact that one members wife had a due day just after returning from Mexico, dictated a reworking of the route.

Baja was tossed ... in most peopleís minds anyway. Steve still wanted to go to Baja, and kept saying he was heading for the ferry, if he ever saw the sea. I also wanted to go to Baja, but I saw it as another adventure. John was caught between us.

Revised Route ...

Day One - Presidio, Texas/Ojinaga, Chihuahua to Creel, Chihuahua
Day Two - Creel, Chihuahua to El Fuerte, Sinaloa via Batopilas, Chihuahua
Day Three - El Fuerte, Sinaloa to Tťmoris, Chihuahua via Huatabampo, Sonora for lunch with Johnís in-laws
Day Four - Tťmoris, Chihuahua to Creel, Chihuahua via Urique, Chihuahua
Day Five - Bonus / Off Day
Day Six - Creel, Chihuahua to Buenaventura, Chihuahua via Basaseachic Falls
Day Seven - Buenaventura, Chihuahua to Fort Hancock, Texas
Day Eight - Fort Hancock, Texas to Presidio, Texas/Ojinaga, Chihuahua to retrieve our vehicles.

We had added a day ...

OK, Iím betting that you experienced adventure riders are still laughing at the "revised route". It was still ambitious, but believe me, I saw it as 1000% more achievable than our original route. As we all know ... every good adventure needs a plan and most plans get tossed in the first minutes of any good adventure.

There was still hope ...

One of our additional adventurers to help us grow to 16 was the owner of Wolfman Luggage. Steve had met Eric at the Nevada Rally Experience and all of a sudden, we all developed the desire to try and buy out Ericís entire supply of Wolfman luggage.

But that is getting things out of order ...

Intervention Two -

In early August, we organized a ride from Pandale, Texas out to Van Horn, Texas and back to act a shakedown trip. Four days and 1,100 miles with many of the group and a few other folks in beautiful Big Bend, Texas. That is always a great way to spend a long weekend.
This would not be a new adventure for many of us with the exception of Longfellow Road (all but me) and the Lost Trail (a few). In Marathon, we lost Matt, my Cajun buddy from south Louisiana and a tense couple of hours transpired before we located him. It would have been easier, but there were only a few of us capable of understanding the unique "English" he uttered, and trust me on this, none of them live in Big Bend. Ken and I located him and we backtracked in the darkness to Terlingua Ranch. This led to lesson number one ...

Lesson Number One -

Everyone needs a riding buddy that they always know the whereabouts of. We would not have lost him if one person had been responsible for him, rather than the "group". Now I understand how mothers lose kids in the grocery store and drive off without them.

That is but the first part of the intervention, as I went down while being distracted in thought and broke my right scapula. Well, it was only 400 miles back to my truck ... letís go ... I can hold the throttle with my hand, as long as I use my left hand to put my right hand on the throttle. This lead to lesson number two ...

Lesson Number Two -

Donít fall down, it will hurt you.

Both lessons would come to haunt us later.



Stop laughing!!

The fall of 2006 was uneventful, see comments about shopping for bags above, and soon the Terlingua Dual Sport Ride preparation and execution was behind Steve, John and I. Only Thanksgiving and Christmas loomed between us and the adventure that had come to be known as MEXadventure 2007.

An Aside ...

During the Terlingua Dual Sport Ride we encountered some folks with a great deal of recent experience in Baja ...
To the casual comment about going from Mulegť, Baja California Sur to Mikeís Sky Ranch, Baja California Norte in one day, their comment was ... are you crazy?

Ok, I was feeling a bit better about the route change ...

Well, I thought I was feeling better. About 11:30 PM, the Wednesday before Christmas, I awoke with what felt like an ice pick in my right ear. Hurt does not even begin to tell the story. I had been fighting a cold about a week, but the only time I had ever experienced this was once when I was a kid. I managed to get back to sleep and awoke in the morning to find my pillowcase covered in blood and my ear crusted up with dried blood. A trip to the doctor ensued. Some of yíall may have noticed that it was a bit chillier, as everyone that knows me, knows that it would be a cold day in hell before I would go to the doc at the first sign of anything being wrong. I always wait until I can smell the rot, run out of beer, or my vacation is over, whichever comes first. She confirmed that I had messed up my ear, gave me some antibiotics and told me that I would be unable to hear and that my ear would ring for a while.

After a week of banging into walls, I realized that I had to have lights on for the visual clues, as I drifted to the right without them. I also could not tell where things are by sound and kept losing where my cell phone was. If I could not see the flashing, I could not find it. Therefore it became a permanent fixture on my hip, even around the house. I had to consider changing the ring of my phone as it was the same ring I was getting in my ear.

Stop laughing!! Wait a minute, that may actually be the ringing ... shhhhhhh ...
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Old 01-14-2007, 12:11 PM   #2
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pics pics...


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Old 01-14-2007, 12:11 PM   #3
Teeds OP
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Day T-2

Who remembers Creep Show II?

Remember the green slime and how everyone was trying to escape itís grip?

Well that is what "it" felt like to me.

Being self employed is great, because every now and again my boss fires me because of my attitude, and I get a few days away from work. The world was determined to not let go and my attitude was ... uhh ... Iíll leave it at bad. I get paid to drive square pegs through round holes and now "it" was beginning to feel like a game of Whack a Mole at the local Chucky Cheese Restaurant ... I needed a break ... fire me!! Are you listening?

I was only 30 minutes late getting to Mikeís house and an hour late to Geneís house, which only left me an hour and a half late to Suzyís house to drop off a computer. She was kind enough to agree to download all the viagra, Costa Rica land offers, penny stock offers, and "enlargement" SPAM emails on my laptop. All that to make sure the server was not so clogged as to be unable to accept the three or four emails that I might get that were important.





Only a quarter of a day behind schedule, we were finally on I-30 heading west out of the Metromess. Bakerís Ribs, in Weatherford, served up BBQ and only 3 hours of driving in the rain separated us from beds. We came in for a landing in Sweetwater, Texas, home of the WASP Museum and took up residence on the second floor of the Days Inn.

The National WASP WWII Museum
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Old 01-14-2007, 12:14 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gadget Boy
pics pics...


I'm uploading them and writing at the same time ... the foundation had to be built and it is often an unseen part of every good adventure.

THIS is good, I promise
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Old 01-14-2007, 12:26 PM   #5
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so the ringing and banging into things was still going on when you shoved off??


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Old 01-14-2007, 12:35 PM   #6
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T-1

The day started early. We awoke to the sounds of working stiffs at the motel, firing up and warming up their trucks, as they prepared to face the day.

The restaurant on-site served up a free breakfast and let me assure you ... we got our monies worth! Bad, I tell you ... bad ...

Wal-Mart satisfied a small lists of oops and we were soon motoring west.

Mike ... is that an evil grin or what?



Gene ... normally he does not have the deer in the headlights look, but it was early



Everything appears to be riding nicely ...



We passed an upcoming renovation project I am starting in Big Spring in the spring. Midland and Odessa fell by the wayside and we turned off the interstate at Monahans to head south towards Alpine and Presidio.

While we were filling our truck and bikes with fuel Mike mentioned that a buddy was in the area scouting for property for his oil company. About that time Mike’s phone rang and it was his buddy. He was in a rent car parked about fifty feet from us. Go figure. As big as West Texas is, we both arrive at the same gas station at the same time. Introductions ensued and we chatted a while before heading back out on the road.

Coyanosa, the I10/US 67 intersection, and Alpine fell behind, as we battled the headwinds westward towards Marfa. The winds were unbelievable as they were focused by the mountains around Alpine.

Marfa served up a splash (fifty something dollars actually) of diesel, and we headed south towards Presidio. In the relative quiet of a crosswind, we were all lost in our individual thoughts about the trip. Nervous laughter remained as the only outward evidence of the upcoming test.

Bad Omen -

Somewhere along the road between Marfa and Presidio, we encountered a flock of birds on the right side of the road. As is often the unexplainable case with wildlife, they all decided that they needed to be on the left side of the road just as I appeared on their little piece of the road. Well, the last one misjudged the speed of my Silverado and committed suicide on my grill. Bummer, as I went bowling for racoons on the road to Pandale just before breaking my shoulder in August. Now I am not superstitious and walk under ladders regularly, but killing animals lost its thrill when the Army taught me how to hunt humans back in the 70's. Now I get bummed when I kill any animal and thoughts of that bird weighed on me as I passed through the ghost town of Shafter, on our way to Presidio.

Those thoughts crowded to the back of my mind as we entered Presidio. Skinny had called saying we were all going to go to Ojinaga to get our tourist visas upon our arrival. We piled in Steve and my trucks and off we went. John was running interference, as he knew Spanish. The rest of us ducklings trailed along behind him.



True to course, the fellow behind the desk was not behind the desk when we arrived. John had to ask around for someone to help us. Well, upon encountering a group of six of us, he felt overwhelmed about the possibility that he might have to work and sent us our way with the admonition that we could ONLY get a visa on the departure date ... yea right, but we knew better than trying to buck the system ... we would simply wait for a shift change, so ... back across the border to America we headed.

Border Guard: Everyone Americans here?
Us: Yup
Guard: How long you been in Mexico?
Me: About 10 minutes, we were trying to get tourist visas.
Guard: OK, you are clear to go.

Hee Hee, we waved at Steve as they had to stop because of Ian ... he is British and cannot say y’all well enough to fake out the border guard.
Copies of the emergency contact list ... I asked for 12, paid for 12, and got 15 (typical somehow), and some last minute shopping in the Dollar General and we headed back to the Three Palms Motel for a few hours before attempting to return to the border.

Ray and Bill arrived and we headed back to the border in smaller groups. Ahhh, the sweet smell of success, or was it the taco stand up the street? ... it didn’t matter, we had our visas. When I went back outside, I saw Micah in Roger’s truck and found out that Tim and Jeremy were inside getting Jeremy’s papers wrapped up.

Now the entire gang was here!!!

Only dinner and repacking remained ...

The Oasis Restaurant, right next door to the Three Palms Motel served up dinner. Then we were off to ...

Pack
Lift
Toss out and repack
Lift
Toss out and repack
Lift
Dang this bag is heavy ...

In a variation of the Peter Principal, crap carried was expanding to fill the space available. The camping gear (my security blanket) was taking up way too much space and weighed more than I wanted to carry, but this was Mexico and I refer you again to the route at the start of the thread ...

Stop laughing!!

This concludes the build-up of the trip and brings you to the first intermission. Go get a favorite beverage. From now on there will be multiple versions of this tale as others get on-line and contribute their thoughts and photos to the menagerie that came of MEXadventure 2007.

I should say HOPEFULLY they will post. Many are embarrassed to have been associated with what they consider to be a fiasco, but I accept it as a learning experience.

I learned a great deal about myself and other folks on this adventure.
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Old 01-14-2007, 12:40 PM   #7
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Location: 427 miles ENE of Orla Texas
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General Information on the Trip

We started with 16 wanting to go, but 2 had to drop out early on, and one more two days before we left, because of an injury to his knee that was aggravated by a ski trip between Christmas and New Years.

We stood at 13 for departure ...

Bill - 400 DRZ
Gene - XT 600
Ian - 400 DRZ
Jeremy - XR650R
John - WR450
Micah - 400 DRZ
Mike - 605 ATK
Ray - XR650R
Roger - XR650L
Skinny - 610 Husky
Steve - XR650R
Tim - XR650L
Tony - XR650R (me)

Riding experience varied from almost forever (Skinny and Steve) to Ian (a few years).

Ages ranged from Skinny at the top to Jeremy. I am very near the top ...
Some had been to this part of Mexico before (John, Mike, Micah, Ray, Roger and Tim), but the rest had not.

Mike had been around the world and I hear that experience became a true asset.

Stop laughing!!
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Tony Eeds aka Teeds - Proud member of the Peanut Gallery and the Pajama Economy
Good roads bring bad people
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Old 01-14-2007, 12:41 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nelgallan
so the ringing and banging into things was still going on when you shoved off??


yup ... still ringing ... rather loudly, thank you ...

I see you are a witch doctor ... any ideas?
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Good roads bring bad people
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Old 01-14-2007, 04:57 PM   #9
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Day One - Friday
Blastoff!
January 5, 2007 had arrived

8:30ish, we headed south towards and across the border. Along the way, we topped off our tanks at the Presidio 66 station as Villa Aldama, Chihuahua was a ways away.

We stopped almost immediately and exchanged some bucks for pesos. 10.1:1 was not too bad, considering we could see the border, if we turned around. The official exchange rate of the Pemex stations was 9:1, so we were doing better than that.

Since 10.1:1 is real close to 10:1 and my math skills are somewhat limited after a beer, I hung my hat on 10:1. I figuring all I needed to do was drop the final zero to decide the value of something. Close enough for horse shoes, hand grenades and atom bombs, and in this case, all my purchases in Mexico.

Well Ojinaga was, is and likely, will always be, under construction, at least the road out to the toll road is, so we wondered about. Seeing your folks going left and right across your direction of travel became suggestive of our ability to travel together for the balance of the trip. We gradually broke up into a fast group and a slower group. I will not say slow, because we were still fast, but we were not ripping up the asphalt. I have seen many adventures ruined in the first rush to adventure in my many years in the wilderness, and was determined to keep the pace sane, as Creel was WAY over the horizon.

At the intersection of the toll road and Chih 67, we encountered the first military checkpoint. We had passed through the Aduana Station just moments before, but the military was there for drugs, not tourists, so we were waved through.

On Chih 67



Kicking it up a notch, we motored southward across the plains (mesa?) of northern Chihuahua.



An aside ...

For those of you following along on the map, the toll road roughly parallels the railroad tracks that loop-de-loops southward out of Ojinaga towards Chihuahua.

Back to the story ...

Tradition dictates that when you lose sight of the person behind you, you slow down. Tim slowed down and I slowed down as I was in front of him. With the leader trying to run 70, it is hard for the guys at the end of the whip to keep up. Gene was on a XT 600 and the jetting was a bit off, so 55 was about it, before it would cough and sputter. We stopped and gathered all the quail back up, only to discover that a couple of folks had been tied up in a turn/no turn scenario at the military checkpoint and only the friendly gesture by the guards got them on the right road ...

See Lesson Number One -

That one had fallen apart all too quickly. Oh well, the fast group tore off again and the rest of us followed.

We caught up (at least momentarily) at the toll booth ... 34 pesos please ...

And in the middle of nowhere ...




This is a test ... how many dollars, using my simplified math? If you said $3.40, go get a favorite beverage.

We stopped for a baZo break ... la cerca served this role.

Outside of Villa Aldama, we all begin the process of going from main to reserve. My bike ran out at the worst possible time. A truck was behind me, there was a sharp drop off on the shoulder that disappeared into brambles so thick I would have been lost and the grade was up hill ... couple that with gloves too thick to flip the lever and I came to a halt. The guys behind me stopped, the truck honked and passed us like a getto cruiser through a toll booth, and I got the lever flipped ... the sounds of Willie Nelson wafted through my brain as I heard the XR fire back to life ... on the road again.

Gene coasted to a stop in front of me. I gave him a Primus bottle full of fuel and he poured fuel in his gas tank, as he had already used his bottle. I laid my bike over with his help and we were off into town. The Pemex filled us up and we soon gathered about. As the first group was no where in sight, Roger asked if my GPS could get us through town. I said it could and we headed out on the by pass around Villa Aldama.

An aside ...

If you are concerned about gas and cannot go 130~140 miles on a tank, do not use the toll road or carry gas between Ojinaga and Villa Aldama. That would be the only time we needed to worry, but there is little to nothing out there. Also, the Pemex Station is in the heart of Villa Aldama, so follow "Business" Chih 16 into town. There is a new Pemex just past where the bypass and the old route come back together, but it is 5 pesos for the baZos there. We just went in together. It was a two (dos) holer.


Back to the story ...

Where the bypass and the old route reconnected, we ran into the rest of the gang. Unfortunately, they fired up and took off just as we arrived. John dropped something (which turned out to be a Leatherman) and by the time I had picked it up and tucked it safely away, the fast group was over the horizon. Not to worry, we could get there in time.





An aside ...

Coming into Chihuahua, I was struck by the roadside architecture. Similar to many of the buildings in the arid southwest US, they harkened back to the 30's, 40's and 50's, when automobile travel was king. Did I mention that I am a historic preservation architect? I was chewing on this like a dog with a fresh cut of prime steak.

Back to the story ...

Gene and I were WAY behind. Try as we might, we could not get through the traffic. Even lane splitting would not work on this road, as the no man’s land where the stripes reside was 6~8 inches above the roadbed in many places, which is not conducive to passing when trucks are on both sides.

I saw the left turn for the airport and vaguely remembered it in the instructions. The waving arms of one other adventurers made me feel a bit better about the decision as he awaited us on the far side of the turn. Unfortunately, he took off as the light turned green and we had two large trucks we could not get around because of the road width. The trucks lumbered along at maybe 20 MPH, so we simply fell farther behind. At least Gene’s jetting was not hindering our forward progress, only two vastly overloaded dump trucks.

Finally getting around them, I spotted the guys again and the chase was on. I will be mercifully brief about the balance of the process of getting through Chihuahua as I would probably start cussing anyway. Just suffice it to say that Chihuahua finally spit us out on Chih 16 and we continued towards Creel.

Lunch was served a Pemex station on the south side of Chihuahua accompanied by the bump and grind of a couple of late teenage girls dancing to the sound emanating from their third world brief case. This was the first time all 13 of us had been in the same timeslot, except for a few brief moments, since leaving Ojinaga.











Everyone mounted up and the groups split up again. John waited as my XR was being cranky (altitude?) and would not start. Finally it started ... and off we roared. I could see the tail end of the second group of riders in the distance so I wicked it up in hunt of a rear knobby, feeling certain that John was doing the same. The traffic was crowded ... think 635 around Dallas, 610 around Houston ... so the focus was on not becoming a statistic.

Did I mention the wind? Well the hills perpendicular to the road were playing weird tricks with the wind. If you were next to a cut, the wind was from the left and you leaned that way. Cross into the valley between hills and the wind was from the right, so lean right. Over and over, up the wall of the mountain to the mesa above. Every now and again I attempted to look for John in my rear view mirror, but because of concentrating on the wind I was at the top near an obelisk, before I felt comfortable to stop.

John did not appear and I was sitting in the middle of nowhere. I was comfortable that the group had stopped as well, but I didn’t know how far ahead they were. With the knowledge that the roadbed split north and southbound lanes, I didn’t feel comfortable going back, for fear of passing John without being able to see him. So ... I went on and in about five miles, I found the balance of the second group. They told me that the fast group was on the road to Creel. It was decided that we would send folks back at one minute intervals in case someone saw John and the folks in front had missed him. If you lost the guy behind you, you were to assume that John had been found. Complicated, perhaps, but in the heat of the battle, it seemed like the best plan.

Micah, Ray and Mike headed back ... Micah returned, no luck ... Ray returned, John had been located. We headed back, again at 1 minute intervals in case Mike and John got back on the road and missed us.

To make a long story short, John’s saga had started with a flat, then a pinched tube and by the time we found him, he was borrowed a wrench from Micah and was cleaning sand from his float bowl. Well, getting the slower herd of cats (plus 1) together and back on the road in the same timeslot had set us back about 2 to 2 1/2 hours, if I remember correctly.

Cuauhtemoc was the next town and we had a police escort through town. Well sort of anyway. He was going the same direction we were and he/we all diligently waved and grinned as we passed him.

Oops, where is Hoop? His bike had stalled at a light and we stopped as soon as we found a safe spot out of traffic. It was right in front of a shop that sold boiled squash. How is that for a specialty?

Squash Cooker



Mike, while waiting on Hoop ...



Hoop soon reappeared and we headed towards the edge of town in search of a Pemex. Sure enough, right on Chih 16 stood a modern "self service" Pemex. Attendants were scurrying about taking the pesos. Soon we were back on the road and heading west now on Chih 16 towards Adolfo Lůpez Mateos. The road was a complete mess and all you could do is follow the rhythm of the traffic as it appears to be as bad as "rush hour" in America.



Dos chica with "Cowgirl Up" on the back window of their Silverado and a death wish, made us look like good drivers as they rushed headlong into the future, oblivious to the fact that they skirted death almost constantly. Crosses lined the road in some areas and shrines appears to be placed at the more deadly areas. They should have noticed, but they were busy with makeup ...

In any case, the sun went down, or at least it did on my GPS, so this means we pull over, correct? We have always been told that you don’t drive in Mexico after dark, so we are going to stop, correct? Naw ... we slogged on.

Did I mention the fact that we had not reached the junction of Chih 16 and the road to Creel? We finally turned south and after the sun went down, entered the twisties. Holy Chihuahua, this road had more curves than all the girls in Chihuahua. Most were covered in water that was diligently trying to become ice.

An aside ...

After arriving in Creel, everyone talked of the fires along the edge of the road for people to stop and warm themselves besides ... who in the hell had time to look at anything other than the lines on the highway? Are these super humans I ride with? But I digress ...

Back to the story ...

Cloaked in darkness, the world shrinks to the width of my Baja Designs (unpaid advertising) headlight and the pinpoint of the tail light of John’s bike in front of me. This is beyond nuts, but for a while we have a Nissan Pickup running a blocking pattern for a bunch of broken field runners. Then the yoyo at the front of our pack passed the Nissan!!!! Now, we are going it alone leaving our blocking cover behind. Nuts I tell you, completely nuts!

Oops there is a sign for topes. Kawump I should have stood up ... there goes a church on the right. Say a prayer for me Padre, I don’t have time to stop ... Oh lord, was that a beer barn? Clearly, THAT fellow used to live in Texas. I have seen it all ...

Whoops, there is a car in my lane going slow ... screw the traffic laws ... what traffic laws ... pass that sucker ... the tail light is getting smaller ...

Finally I see the sign that says ... Creel 7.5 Km ... OK, with nothing else to do, I tried to figure out how far that was ... let’s see ... 1 Km = 0.62 miles (approximately for those of y’all that really care) , so if I round it off at 0.6, so that means 0.1 = 0.75 miles, so 7.5 Km should be about 4.5 miles ...

OK, how that I had finally figured out that bit of trivia, can SOMEONE please tell me why I had not ridden 4.5 miles by that time and FOUND Creel! Things were getting nuts! Did I mention the cold? Maybe that is why the 7.5 Km, felt like 75 Km.

Holy Honda there Batman, I think I see lights. We gather at the edge of town and head into the middle of the fray. One wrong turn and we found Casa Margarita’s. I could have kissed the ground, but it was covered with ice and dirt. Actually there was ice and dirt everywhere. I learned that it snowed recently for the first time in a long time and no one could remember the last time it snowed that much.

An aside ...

My mother is laughing right now, the Eeds curse is alive and well. When she was alive, she said that all someone had to do to break a drought is to invite us there on vacation. Oops, maybe I should not have mentioned that ...

Back to the story ...

Casa Margarita’s was serving dinner when we arrived and we dumped our gear and quickly joined the gang for dinner. We drank the place dry of Sol and had to move on to wine and their namesake drink ... margaritas.

Beer goggles



Skinny and Mike



Steve and Roger



My dinner ... yum



The entire gang, except for the ones that were missing ... uhhhh ...



Dinner behind us, sleep came quickly. Hopefully tomorrow everyone will calm down a bit and we can get back on track.

Today’s route almost proved to be more than we could achieve. The fast group made Creel about 5:30 PM, while the rest of us came in around 8:00 PM.

Tomorrow, the road to Batopilas ...

Stop laughing!!
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Teeds screwed with this post 01-14-2007 at 05:03 PM
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Old 01-14-2007, 06:46 PM   #10
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Nate
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Old 01-15-2007, 06:39 AM   #11
Teeds OP
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Accomodations

Before I go a bit farther into the report, I want to recommend that anyone considering going to Creel, consider staying with

Hotel Plaza Mexicana Margarita
Zona Centro Creel, Chihuahua, Mexico
Tel./Fax. (635) 456-02-45, 456-01-08
hotelesmargaritas@hotmail.com
http://www.hoteles-margaritas.com - I could not get it to come up ...



Nice and affordable accommodations, that include breakfast and supper in the price of the room. Hot water and heat in every room.

Caesar speaks very good English, which can be a real plus in certain situations.

In addition, they have hotels in two other towns nearby, Batopilas and (help me out Tim, Roger, Gene, Mike) ...

Type in Margaritas and Creel in Google and you will get pages of links to reviews.
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Old 01-15-2007, 07:37 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Teeds
yup ... still ringing ... rather loudly, thank you ...

I see you are a witch doctor ... any ideas?
ear infections are tough. its going to take at least two chickens, maybe a goat, some direct ear antibiotics, aleve, and plenty o rest.

awesome report so far. keep it coming
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Old 01-15-2007, 07:58 AM   #13
Teeds OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nelgallan
ear infections are tough. its going to take at least two chickens, maybe a goat, some direct ear antibiotics, aleve, and plenty o rest.

awesome report so far. keep it coming
Actually the ear infection appears to be gone, assuming pain would be associated with infection. It has not hurt in a while, but I can only hear very loud noises out of it and the ringing is getting old. The repair by my body is on-going and seems to be taking forever.

Thanks for the encouragement about the report. I know it is more wordy than most here, but hopefully people can learn from our experience.

I will be posting Day Two soon ... It has some great photos of La Bufa Canyon on the way to Batopilas.
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Old 01-15-2007, 08:20 AM   #14
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Thumb Nice

Great Job Keep it comming......
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Old 01-15-2007, 08:47 AM   #15
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Nice

Tony I will let you keep going. great job so far!
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