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Old 08-03-2013, 10:29 AM   #18166
kcieslicki
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How many years back were the "dream days"? I've only been riding 5 years
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Old 08-03-2013, 10:30 AM   #18167
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Originally Posted by kcieslicki View Post
How many years back were the "dream days"? I've only been riding 5 years
For me, mid 80s to around 9/11 -

went downhill after that, and much worse once bloomberg took the wheel.
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Old 08-03-2013, 10:33 AM   #18168
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I've got to get my a$$ down to the ear one day and hear the stories from those days.

Spent 3 months in San Fran 2 years ago and that was urban moto heaven for me.
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Old 08-03-2013, 10:47 AM   #18169
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I've got to get my a$$ down to the ear one day and hear the stories from those days.

Spent 3 months in San Fran 2 years ago and that was urban moto heaven for me.
City was a different place then, but I'm sure someone from the 50's would laugh at my comparisons. I think it comes down to this - at least from those days; there was a prominent middle class here - less an elite (see$$$) majority. There were indeed less cars, and more of a commuter hours cycle (this is now universal not just NYC) you could avoid.

Cops used to wave you into traffic to spilt lanes (I'm serious). They would say, "you got a bike right... well go!" - they knew by lane splitting you would actually relieve traffic, not make it worse.

There were dozens of bike only parking islands (un-official) where you could see 50 bikes parked, locked and sometimes covered. You got to know people at these "islands" and everyone watched out for each other's bikes.

Bottom line; there was a ton more freedom, you minded your own business, and so did the city/cops/etc.
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Old 08-03-2013, 11:05 AM   #18170
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City was a different place then, but I'm sure someone from the 50's would laugh at my comparisons. I think it comes down to this - at least from those days; there was a prominent middle class here - less an elite (see$$$) majority. There were indeed less cars, and more of a commuter hours cycle (this is now universal not just NYC) you could avoid.

Cops used to wave you into traffic to spilt lanes (I'm serious). They would say, "you got a bike right... well go!" - they knew by lane splitting you would actually relieve traffic, not make it worse.

There were dozens of bike only parking islands (un-official) where you could see 50 bikes parked, locked and sometimes covered. You got to know people at these "islands" and everyone watched out for each other's bikes.

Bottom line; there was a ton more freedom, you minded your own business, and so did the city/cops/etc.
It was better: you were younger. (made me think of this doc I seen)

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Old 08-03-2013, 11:08 AM   #18171
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Originally Posted by Zodiac View Post
City was a different place then, but I'm sure someone from the 50's would laugh at my comparisons. I think it comes down to this - at least from those days; there was a prominent middle class here - less an elite (see$$$) majority. There were indeed less cars, and more of a commuter hours cycle (this is now universal not just NYC) you could avoid.

Cops used to wave you into traffic to spilt lanes (I'm serious). They would say, "you got a bike right... well go!" - they knew by lane splitting you would actually relieve traffic, not make it worse.

There were dozens of bike only parking islands (un-official) where you could see 50 bikes parked, locked and sometimes covered. You got to know people at these "islands" and everyone watched out for each other's bikes.

Bottom line; there was a ton more freedom, you minded your own business, and so did the city/cops/etc.
I am about the same age of you and have been riding since 88 in the city. It has gotten tougher but there was always a pain in he ass enforcement. I got an open visor ticket in the late 80's. Got caught lane splitting and no ticket but the bastard set a timer for 30 minutes and I had to wait. If i wanted to go i would get a ticket.
The theft and knock-over problem has not really changed, though you are correct we did lose all of the defacto parking areas. Before Muni-meters and that headache we had regular meters where if you parked in the middle of a spot people would be pissed and move or knock over your bike, and if you squeezed between the two sometimes a-hole metermaids would ticket for two vehicles in a spot.

It may have been better back then but but it wasn't paradise.
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Old 08-03-2013, 11:14 AM   #18172
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It was better: you were younger. (made me think of this doc I seen)

>
Well of course, nostalgia dictates we always think our prime is the best time.


But trust me; NYC was much MUCH more free and better to motorcyclists than it is now. And the genie's out of the bottle. It's only going to get worse, at least until we're all riding city mandated, speed governed electric scooters....

And at that stage, they can have it.
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Old 08-03-2013, 11:17 AM   #18173
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Originally Posted by RichBeBe View Post
I am about the same age of you and have been riding since 88 in the city. It has gotten tougher but there was always a pain in he ass enforcement. I got an open visor ticket in the late 80's. Got caught lane splitting and no ticket but the bastard set a timer for 30 minutes and I had to wait. If i wanted to go i would get a ticket.
The theft and knock-over problem has not really changed, though you are correct we did lose all of the defacto parking areas. Before Muni-meters and that headache we had regular meters where if you parked in the middle of a spot people would be pissed and move or knock over your bike, and if you squeezed between the two sometimes a-hole metermaids would ticket for two vehicles in a spot.

It may have been better back then but but it wasn't paradise.
Yep, for me it was 85.

But I disagree - I think I went virtually a decade at one point of riding daily, of never receiving a ticket, not even a parking ticket!

And when I did get waved over it was a minor verbal warning at best.

Law wasn't an issue for me at all, until around a year or so after 9/11.
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Old 08-03-2013, 11:43 AM   #18174
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Before Muni-meters and that headache we had regular meters where if you parked in the middle of a spot people would be pissed and move or knock over your bike, and if you squeezed between the two sometimes a-hole metermaids would ticket for two vehicles in a spot.
Has sharing a spot ever been illegal here and if so, when did that change? Since I started reading the law books several years ago I had determined that sharing a parking spot is perfectly legal.

BTW I wonder if knock-overs are increasing due to the rising popularity of SUVs.
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Old 08-03-2013, 11:59 AM   #18175
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BTW I wonder if knock-overs are increasing due to the rising popularity of SUVs.
I doubt that's the reason - more so that even just 10 yrs ago there were a ton more parking spots, less restrictive signage (and like I mentioned, bike only islands)

I remember when they changed the laws in the UES, and within wks they changed all the signage on the east/west streets to crazy restrictions (as in many had new no parking daytime hours). The city has essentially "taken" streets that had less parking restrictions, less alt side cleaning, and increased it in the last 20 years. (see huge moneymaker for NYC, almost a billion annual on tickets alone).

Add that with the huge increase in muni parking areas (far wider blanket than the old coin operated meters), and the overall increase in car owners in the city (i.e. $$) and all vehicles get squeezed out.

The comparison to SUVs needs a caveat. Most cars up until the late 80s were pretty freaking long and big, compared to the many many compacts we see today. Compacts were pretty rare until the late 80s. So even though we now see SUVs commonly, they're actually not taking up as much space as a mid 70's sedan.
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Old 08-03-2013, 12:22 PM   #18176
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Vehicles were bigger but those land yachts still had better visibility than modern vehicles with their steeply angled windows and hi skirt lines. And the view out of any old land yacht is better than out the back of a minivan or SUV. Also now with muni-meters the vehicles are parking closer, leaving less room for bikes to squeeze between.
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Old 08-03-2013, 12:39 PM   #18177
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Most modern SUVs have back-up cameras, which will be standard features on cars before long. For what it's worth, I've never had a GS get knocked over in the city in 10 years of street parking, but in the six months during which I had a K1200RS it got knocked over twice. Tall bikes are better for visibility, and I wouldn't try to street park a bike in the city that didn't have a center stand.

In general, I wholeheartedly agree with Zodiac's sentiment. I keep my bikes for day trips out of the city, tours, and errands around outer boroughs. Manhattan is a hostile place for motorcycles in almost every regard.

My favorite thing to do these days is to escape to the north, hit 684, hyperspace to Armonk and take 22 north to the Carmel area, where there are tons of beautiful, low-traffic roads. Stop at Purdys Farmer and the Fish for a cold brew and a lobster roll around mid-day and ride around the country roads for a few more hours before battling it back home
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Old 08-03-2013, 01:38 PM   #18178
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and I wouldn't try to street park a bike in the city that didn't have a center stand.

l

Funny, I'm just the opposite.

I think bikes parked among cars are far more stable on their side stands..

I've seen good winds knock a bike over on a CS, and a car backing up can topple a top heavy bike on a CS much easier than when it's parked on an angle, locked in 1st gear on a side stand.
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Old 08-03-2013, 05:55 PM   #18179
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Good 'ol days were the 60's-70's. No helmet law, no motorcycle license required. There was dedicated motorcycle parking at the Battery, at 14th and Park at the park, at 23rd and Park at the park, at Columbus Circle, and a few others around the city I can't remember.

But my Triumph was still being knocked over, or put on the sidewalk and my spot stolen.

What has happened under Bloomberg with street closures, park road closures, bicycles taking over the city, etc. is a travesty.
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Old 08-03-2013, 07:47 PM   #18180
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snip

My favorite thing to do these days is to escape to the north, hit 684, hyperspace to Armonk and take 22 north to the Carmel area, where there are tons of beautiful, low-traffic roads. Stop at Purdys Farmer and the Fish for a cold brew and a lobster roll around mid-day and ride around the country roads for a few more hours before battling it back home

i'll buy your lunch. when you leading the group ride? weekday or weekend i'll make time
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