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Old 04-12-2006, 02:26 PM   #16
Surly
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The bike sits high because it has ground clearance (for off road use )
Lowering the seat is a compromise
Lowering links are a compromise
Sliding forks up the tripples are a compromise

It might sounds like I am being a dick but....
Keep your feet on the pegs where they belong
Thats the deal. Thats how bikes work best. We all know that and we all put our feet down at one time or another

If you had a bike with 12" suspension travel and a 30" seat height you'd blow your knees out going from sitting to standing all day not to mention its be cramped worse than a gixxer

Anyway I am ranting.
Lowering bikes is something lots of folks do and I do see why but I think it ruins a good motorcycle

Still if anyone wants to try my Kouba links they can and decide for themselves. I expect that they will end up taking them off just like I did
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Old 04-12-2006, 03:12 PM   #17
ErrinV
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There's lots of good information in this thread. I'm second guessing the lowering links I put in now. I'm going on a ride to the desert this weekend so I'll pay close attention to how the bike is handling (bottoming out, rubbing). If I notice anything I'll probably remove the links. I think one thing that may be in my favor is I only weigh 160lbs so I'm one of the few people that KTM had in mind when setting up the stock suspension.

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Old 04-12-2006, 04:03 PM   #18
warewolf
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Surly
Keep your feet on the pegs where they belong
Thats the deal. Thats how bikes work best. We all know that and we all put our feet down at one time or another
Surly, I'm with you all the way on that one. I only put my feet down when I'm stopped - or about to! My concern is stopping without falling over, and getting going again, in rough terrain. Standing-start manouveres, that kind of thing. It's no big deal on gravel roads, but when it gets more technical it becomes an issue. I'm willing to adapt in order to have a much better bike when it is mobile!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Surly
Lowering bikes is something lots of folks do and I do see why but I think it ruins a good motorcycle
The guy who fettled my DR-Z suspension totally agrees with you. He's lowered a few bikes at people's insistence, even though he's advised them against it - mainly because it screws up the suspension operation as mention in this thread. This is a suspension specialist who can use all the tricks to best compensate for the grief he's causing - he still says it's too much of a compromise.

His advice for my Adventure: back off the preload and compression damping all the way.
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Old 04-12-2006, 06:47 PM   #19
lvdukerider
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Im just curious, but does anyone know how KTM shortened the suspention on the Duke II front and rear? Im 6' 4" 225 lbs, tall bikes are no problem for me and I would actualy prefer mine to be abit taller if it wasent a major operation.
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Old 04-12-2006, 07:20 PM   #20
Surly
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lvdukerider
Im just curious, but does anyone know how KTM shortened the suspention on the Duke II front and rear? Im 6' 4" 225 lbs, tall bikes are no problem for me and I would actualy prefer mine to be abit taller if it wasent a major operation.
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Old 04-12-2006, 08:08 PM   #21
meat popsicle
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lvdukerider
Im just curious, but does anyone know how KTM shortened the suspention on the Duke II front and rear? Im 6' 4" 225 lbs, tall bikes are no problem for me and I would actualy prefer mine to be abit taller if it wasent a major operation.
you must not have read the first page... this might be helpful:

Quote:
Originally Posted by KenR
I just had my suspension revalved and resprung. My suspension guy was suprised to find that the Adventure already had spacers in the fork and shock to lower it, installed from the factory. He said without them, the bike would probably be 2" taller - stock!

I wonder if those spacers could simply be made longer to lower it more?
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Old 04-12-2006, 08:46 PM   #22
bmwktmbill OP
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I have tried both of Emig's links and the short link was too short, the longer link just wasn't workable with a full than of fuel and the 100 lbs. of gear I normally travel with because the static sag was down 3 inches front and rear despite dropping the forks and maxing out the preload on the stock spring.
Enduro Engineering says they can do 2 inches front and rear but they want to cut the front springs. I have been e mailing with Sommer KTM and they claim 1 1/4 inches can be had internally without changing anything but messing with the hydro stops. They up the preload in the fork internally as well. They also recommend taking some foam out of the seat.
Those Germans are crafty.
Something has to give.
Bill in Tomahawk, WI.
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Old 04-12-2006, 11:59 PM   #23
Buckster
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Quote:
Originally Posted by meat popsicle
That only works on those poser-Aprilia bikes mang.
I wouldn't know, I am still waiting for my cheque from the insurance company.
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Old 04-13-2006, 12:52 AM   #24
Luke
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lvdukerider
Im just curious, but does anyone know how KTM shortened the suspention on the Duke II front and rear? Im 6' 4" 225 lbs, tall bikes are no problem for me and I would actualy prefer mine to be abit taller if it wasent a major operation.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Surly
A man after Warewolf and Surly heart
+1

You can also fix the hight with the seat. Boejangles made me a 40" high seat for my XR400- easy standing, no more sore knees and riding buddies get to laugh at my mount/dismount antics.
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Old 04-13-2006, 07:22 AM   #25
meat popsicle
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Buckster
I wouldn't know, I am still waiting for my cheque from the insurance company.
It sure does suck that we continue to buy services from companies that don't want to provide them...

I just got my auto renewal policy and it listed my accident as "at fault"! So I called them up and they said I have to call my DMV and straighten it out. So I call them, and they say the accident is listed as ARC#5, which means it's the other driver's fault... The DMV rep said to tell my insurance company to be more careful about reading the forms.

So I called up the insurance company and they said hold on we'll check. I had also told them I expected to be refunded any overpayment due to their error. I held for 10 minutes and then they hung up on me! I guessed they found their error...

So I called back the next day and this representative said that it was listed in the notes that my current policy would be adjusted to reflect the mistake, but if I wanted any refund of past overpayments I would have to send them a copy of the accident report?

She then went on to say that the report they get doesn't list the codes so they assume their policyholder's fault (convienent eh? ) until corrected by the policyholder, whom they don't notify of the responsibility - of course this was all a BOLD FACED LIE since the supervisor previously had told me that the DMV report said it was my fault.

So I told her she was mistaken and she checked some more (probably with a supervisor); luckly I had her call me back so I didn't have to hold while she learned her job! She did call back rather quickly and told me I would be refunded all overpayments within 2 weeks. Case closed. But I am now considering switching insurance companies because this one either sets policies that make it easy for them to overcharge customers or they hire morons who take a wide latitude setting company policy on their own.

The company is Progressive Insurance.

And that is only my Auto policy - don't get me started on my qualms with the motorcycle policy (fairly good but), or medical policy (bastages!)!
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Old 04-13-2006, 08:17 AM   #26
HighwayChile
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I'm with surely on this.......

but if you must, supermoto suspension guys lower all the time, they are not packing the load you are however, their suspension rewuirements differ. . most shops charge $125 an end . I know this doesnt answer your question ( I'm the last guy to tell you how to out your forks together ) you might try a post on supermotojunkie.com

or look at where you are havign the height problem, mount / dismount? off camber ? rough shit? overcome the problem area by practic etc...I'm the same height , and dont want a shorter bike if its rough. or are you mainly road riding?
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Old 04-13-2006, 09:21 PM   #27
lvdukerider
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Quote:
Originally Posted by meat popsicle
you must not have read the first page... this might be helpful:
Yes I read it, but I wasent sure if the Duke II and the Adventure 640 had the same shock and forks. I cant picture how "spacers" would be used to reduce the fork/shock travel, I am familiar with using spacers in forks to increase preload but obviously they must be used diffrently to lower the suspention?
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Old 04-14-2006, 07:18 AM   #28
meat popsicle
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lvdukerider
Yes I read it, but I wasent sure if the Duke II and the Adventure 640 had the same shock and forks. I cant picture how "spacers" would be used to reduce the fork/shock travel, I am familiar with using spacers in forks to increase preload but obviously they must be used diffrently to lower the suspention?
I don't have any idea of what goes on in there, just enough to get me into trouble... "leaf spring upgrades, something called valve work (but I didn't know I had to touch the top end), preloading the dampening - whether its compressed or I am going after a rebound"

Seriously though, I have seen shop rates for lowering, but the folks here say that it's not a black and white thing; namely the manufacturer did not make a range of heights over which the forks/shock work normally. It's a compromise. Good info.
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Old 04-14-2006, 04:54 PM   #29
Whisky
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If you are serious you can have the forks and shock shortened. I had a 98 XR-600 that I had lowered 2 inches front and rear. They shortened the proper springs for my weight and then revalved and set it up for my weight and style. The bike handled like a dream, I still had foam on the seat and I could touch the ground enough to kick start it. I am not talking about flat footing it, I mean low enough so I can get it off the side stand. People who tell you to just get used to it don't have short legs. If you just slack the suspension it will ride like crap, spend the money( you already did once) and make the bike work for you. PM me if you need more, I also lowered a 00 GS-1150 3/4''.
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Old 04-15-2006, 11:27 AM   #30
bmwktmbill OP
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Tore into the forks. They are easy to get apart. I had to use an air impact to spin off the bottom nut/rebound valve as the damper rod just spins inside once it comes loose. Oil goes everywhere so be prepared when the pieces separate. Easy to see how to modify the forks internally. I will shorten springs 2 inches and space the damper rod to compensate. I shipped the rear shock to Brad Lowe. Brad took the time with me and he gets suspension completely. After mine he will know the KTM 640 Adventure. Brad will put a restrictor in the rear shock to raise the rear wheel 2 inches to balance things out front to rear for a 2" total reduction. You have to do some measuring but Brad explains everything. The eye to eye length between the rear shock bolts with the wheel raised is the critical measurement. It turns outto be about 1/2 inch difference due to the lever style suspension on our Adventures. Brad claims no downside to handling due to the linear dampening progression of White Power components, just less ground clearance. Riding after the work is done will be the test.
I also am using a Scotts steering damper. Brad Lowe will make me some bushings for the front forks to space them out. He uses a nylon tupe bushes everywhere and cautions against PVC use as it can shatter screwing up everything.
Again let me recommend Brad Lowe. I talked to twenty shops and most spout BS and don't know the Adventure. I might also recommend Enduro Engineering as they spoke well too. If I do the forks myself the job should be under $200. I will have to cut and heat the fork springs and grind them and change the oil. Well the bike need the fork oil change anyway. I called Renzaco Racing to work up my seat but got the answering machine they never called me back so far. What's up with that?
Bill in Tomahawk, WI.
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