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Old 01-23-2012, 08:49 AM   #59206
Rusty Rocket
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Location: Trying to leave CT
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Quote:
Originally Posted by procycle View Post
This is one reason why dealers everywhere are struggling. I'm not blaming the poor schmuck behind the parts counter. He can't possibly become an expert on every bike that he might sell parts for. The advice he gave you would most likely be correct for most other models but the DR650 eats up cush rubbers in short order. Even though the advice was bad I'll give him a little credit for trying to save you some money.

Lots of riders expect the folks at the dealership to be well trained experts on the bikes they sell. The truth is, in most places the official training is minimal and the dealer personnel just have to learn as they go. The parts counter guy might be an expert on whatever it his that he rides and he might also be knowlegable on whatever his riding buddies ride. Beyond that, he will just be applying his general knowledge to selling parts.

If you read this and other DR650 specific internet forums you can be sure that when you walk into the dealership you will be much more knowledgeable on DR650s than the dealer employees.
We had trouble in the early seventies with the cush rubbers. I had a TS125 (1971) that the cush rubbers wore out also. To save money, we would cut pieces of innertubes to shim the hub. We also tried to fill the gaps with silicone like RTV. Here's a pic of an old TS185 ('71) for your visual enjoyment.


I have some cleaning to do and need a rear brake cable to get her going.
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..1972 Penton Six-Days ..1971 Suzuki TS185.. 2005 KTM 400exc
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Old 01-23-2012, 10:41 AM   #59207
bouldertag
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Joined: May 2008
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Drives me Crazy!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by procycle View Post
This is one reason why dealers everywhere are struggling. I'm not blaming the poor schmuck behind the parts counter. He can't possibly become an expert on every bike that he might sell parts for. The advice he gave you would most likely be correct for most other models but the DR650 eats up cush rubbers in short order. Even though the advice was bad I'll give him a little credit for trying to save you some money.

Lots of riders expect the folks at the dealership to be well trained experts on the bikes they sell. The truth is, in most places the official training is minimal and the dealer personnel just have to learn as they go. The parts counter guy might be an expert on whatever it his that he rides and he might also be knowlegable on whatever his riding buddies ride. Beyond that, he will just be applying his general knowledge to selling parts.

If you read this and other DR650 specific internet forums you can be sure that when you walk into the dealership you will be much more knowledgeable on DR650s than the dealer employees.
I agree!
Drives me crazy! I go to my local Suzuki Dealer on my 2009 DR650 and parked it right in front of the shop and their two main sales-reps. I go in and look around and see a white 2012 DR650 that i wanted to check out to see where they set the stock shock at originally and other stuff i wanted to see.
Both Reps come up to me and ask if i am looking for a DR 650 and I said I already have one and that it is outside. They both said at the same time,"that's a DR650?", Ah yep it is. Mine has the Safari Tank on it and a cee-Bialeys wind screen.
They went back outside to look at it.
The parts guys went out to look at it. I told them i added stiffer springs etc.. They told me they never heard of different springs for the DR 650. They never seen a Vapor either.
Anyways after talking to the Sales and the parts dept i realized these gents don't know anything about the bikes above the regular on the floor sale it arena type stuff.

It would be great if shops personnel had a deeper interest in the bikes they sale and maintain.
I asked about hand guards for my bike and they grab a catalog and start searching.
If i wanted him to search a catalog i could just go online myself and find one..And cheaper.
I was hoping he would go oh ya we have some excellent ones for the DR 650 in stock and some you can order.
But no.
I found out later that the two salesmen do not even ride bikes. uggghh.
My best experience was with KTM dealers and Sales reps who actually ride the bikes they sale. And have a love for riding.
I dont like knowing more then the dealers...about my bike..
Glad there is this site.

boulder
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Old 01-23-2012, 11:28 AM   #59208
eakins
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i've visited alot of parts dept. showing them our maps.
they're not in the "catalog" so we must show them in person.

that's because most every shop just uses the parts unlimited, lockhart catalog and maybe 1 more. jeff would know those names better than i can remember. if it's not in there, the guy have no clue what else is available for most bikes. it's same experience over and over at all the dealers, unless an employee takes a special interest in a particular bike and knows more options. this is the reason why procycle and other online suppliers who pick a niche and specialize, do well. places like motorcycle supper store and rockymtn atv do well because of fast free shipping and great prices for general supply. bikebandit & ron ayers have captures the oem angle as far as discount pricing.

all most dealer have left are uniformed walk-in customer and it will be ordered in in most cases anyway.

i've told a few local dealer they could do well with hiring a parts person who specializes only in mail order and is paid knowing & researching (on the forums) what riders uses and want as far as mods. i said pick 10-15 bikes and focus their guy and specializing on selling parts for those bike.
they said it wasn't worth their time to do that???

as far as most dealer employees...they're younger guys working just enough to be able to ride there bikes.
it's just a job and the ability to buy parts cheaper not a passion. this hold very true in most Japanese dealers.
i found bmw & ktm to be the exception to this.


Quote:
Originally Posted by bouldertag View Post
I agree!
Drives me crazy! I go to my local Suzuki Dealer on my 2009 DR650 and parked it right in front of the shop and their two main sales-reps. I go in and look around and see a white 2012 DR650 that i wanted to check out to see where they set the stock shock at originally and other stuff i wanted to see.
Both Reps come up to me and ask if i am looking for a DR 650 and I said I already have one and that it is outside. They both said at the same time,"that's a DR650?", Ah yep it is. Mine has the Safari Tank on it and a cee-Bialeys wind screen.
They went back outside to look at it.
The parts guys went out to look at it. I told them i added stiffer springs etc.. They told me they never heard of different springs for the DR 650. They never seen a Vapor either.
Anyways after talking to the Sales and the parts dept i realized these gents don't know anything about the bikes above the regular on the floor sale it arena type stuff.

It would be great if shops personnel had a deeper interest in the bikes they sale and maintain.
I asked about hand guards for my bike and they grab a catalog and start searching.
If i wanted him to search a catalog i could just go online myself and find one..And cheaper.
I was hoping he would go oh ya we have some excellent ones for the DR 650 in stock and some you can order.
But no.
I found out later that the two salesmen do not even ride bikes. uggghh.
My best experience was with KTM dealers and Sales reps who actually ride the bikes they sale. And have a love for riding.
I dont like knowing more then the dealers...about my bike..
Glad there is this site.

boulder
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eakins screwed with this post 01-23-2012 at 11:41 AM
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Old 01-23-2012, 12:02 PM   #59209
procycle
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Location: Center of the DR650 universe
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bouldertag View Post
It would be great if shops personnel had a deeper interest in the bikes they sale and maintain
Yeah, but those guys are just like the rest of us. I take a deep interest in dual sport bikes, flattrack racing, mini-supermoto, turbo-diesel motors and a few other oddball things. There's no way I could work up any enthusiasm or interest in chromed out cruisers, Harleys, trikes, full boat touring bikes, etc. There's no way I'm ever going to be knowledgeable about BMWs because I find nothing about them to be interesting. The salesmen working at the dealer are there because they know sales not because they know motorcycles.

The poor saps working at the parts counter really don't have a prayer of knowing very much about everything. For example, back in 1983 when I first started in the motorcycle business Honda had 52 current models for sale. They change up the mix every year with new stuff and of course the old models are all still running around out there. If I look in the model reference guide in the back of my Parts Unlimited off-road catalog there are approximately 750 models listed. The street catalog lists about 1000 models. Anyone who could educate themselves to a high level of knowledge on all those bikes is wasting their time selling parts at a dealership counter.

And of course our wonderful DR650s are barely a blip on any dealership radar. You're lucky if the dealer employees could recognize one (like those salesmen who didn't).

I'm not bitching about this, it's just a fact that most any dealership is going to be spread way too thin to be able to give good expert advice unless you get lucky and stumble into a dealer employee with the same passion as you have. This is not going to change. Dealers have to try to be everything to all customers but it isn't possible to actually do it.

This situation certainly helps my own business. We have structured ProCycle around the bikes that we all own and ride.
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www.procycle.us - Everything for your DR650 and lots of other great stuff!
DR900 Big Bore Stroker buildup
TurboDiesel Corvette - go to the end to start at the beginning
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Old 01-23-2012, 12:12 PM   #59210
procycle
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Location: Center of the DR650 universe
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eakins View Post
i've told a few local dealer they could do well with hiring a parts person who specializes only in mail order and is paid knowing & researching (on the forums) what riders uses and want as far as mods. i said pick 10-15 bikes and focus their guy and specializing on selling parts for those bike.
they said it wasn't worth their time to do that???
Very good advice falling on deaf ears. Too bad.
Quote:
Originally Posted by eakins View Post
as far as most dealer employees...they're younger guys working just enough to be able to ride there bikes.
it's just a job and the ability to buy parts cheaper not a passion. this hold very true in most Japanese dealers.
i found bmw & ktm to be the exception to this.
Many BMW and KTM dealers don't cater to the larger brands so they have a better ability to focus.
__________________
Clarke's second law of Egodynamics: "For every expert, there is an equal and opposite expert." - Jasper Fforde
www.procycle.us - Everything for your DR650 and lots of other great stuff!
DR900 Big Bore Stroker buildup
TurboDiesel Corvette - go to the end to start at the beginning
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Old 01-23-2012, 01:20 PM   #59211
garnaro
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For of us without a real-life knowledge network about the DR, dealerships or otherwise, and limited mechanical background, having ProCycle, Kientech, DRriders, and the folks around here is invaluable. It can really turn working on your moto from a frustrating chore to something fun to do.

All hail the web! Down with PIPA and SOPA!
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Old 01-23-2012, 01:26 PM   #59212
dec181966
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Joined: Oct 2009
Location: NorCal in the vines
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Quote:
Originally Posted by procycle View Post
This situation certainly helps my own business. We have structured ProCycle around the bikes that we all own and ride.
I am in the process of buying my first DR650 and have already spent many an hour on your site...Love it!! I show fellow MCist at work and they amazed at the number of parts you offer for the DR. I tell them this is one of the base reasons I want the DR as my main adventure bike. The people that are passionate about this bike and support it are incredible. I will never want for information or ideas. Between your company and ADVrider I am ready to take on the world with my DR

Great job and I hope to be giving you some of my hard earned cash soon!

PS: Yeah I'm F-ing excited about getting my new bike. Can you tell??

Be safe

Michael
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Old 01-23-2012, 01:47 PM   #59213
MartinPetren
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Joined: Sep 2009
Location: Gothenburg or Uppsala
Oddometer: 325
I just made some own decals at home! My DR is now a Tuareg



You can read about it here:
http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=755265
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Old 01-23-2012, 03:18 PM   #59214
BergDonk
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Location: Snowy Mountains Oz
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Motodeficient View Post
Has anyone ever had a front caliper where the brake pad pin cover screw would NOT come out? I couldn't get that sucker out at all, and the metal is kind of weak. It broke apart when I tried to take it out with a flathead screwdriver, but then it was hard enough I couldn't drill into it very easily to try an easy-out. I pretty much destroyed my caliper I think trying to get this out... Used a dremel and I seem to have fused the screw to the rest of the caliper
These can be a real PITA, and once you get them out, the pins themselves can also be problematic. I replaced mine ASAP with hex head pins and high temp nickel antiseize. My then 1 year old new to me rear caliper pin had to be drilled out.

Steve
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Old 01-23-2012, 04:06 PM   #59215
sect8dr
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goodcat8 View Post
Just missed my sumo setup for sale in the fleamarket. Sold 17's, for a more Enduro size combo. Warp 9 wheels are affordable and good products for someone going sumo. My sumo set was warp 9 that I sold, I bought new wheel sizing from warp 9 to replace. Just make sure they have whatever you need IN STOCK!! I've been waiting almost 7 weeks for my front brake caliper relocation bracket they initially said would take 2 weeks...

I guess i didn't see those or they would have been mine. Still kind of up in the air between a 17 or 19 front. Love supermoto handling, the 690 i owned was the best handling bike i have ever ridden, but without going full bore on the suspension i think i may be disapointed with the DR. Taking all advice, last DR i did was just for the engine with a lot of procycle hop up parts, this time im going all out, eventually.
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Old 01-23-2012, 04:23 PM   #59216
kitsapian
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Location: Kitsap, WA
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no new tabs for DR650 in WA

I posted about this in the PNW regional forum but figured I'd drop a note here too.

I tried to renew the tabs for my '93 DR650 the other day and was informed that because of new legislation in Washington State (SB5800) my DR has been designated a dirt bike. I was told to either get an official letter from Suzuki confirming my bike was safe for street use or get a safety check ($100).

I got Suzuki to fax a letter to the local licensing office confirming it was a street legal machine, but the local licensing ladies faxed that to the state and the state told them it wasn't good enough. In order for me to renew, Suzuki would have to take the DR650 off the list of dirt bike models which it provided to the state. I'm not sure if all years of the 650 are listed, or just the crusty old ones like mine.

I'll probably break down and get the safety inspection or try my luck at a more podunk licensing agency. But I'd like to know if any other WA residents have run into similar trouble. My bike has all the factory lights etc., still has the dual sport designation on its registration, and has had a plate for nearly 20 years. If the DR650 is on this list, there are probably a lot of other dual sports included.

This same legislation allows many dirt bikes to be inspected and plated, which is awesome. I just wish it wasn't screwing with my street legal commuter bike.
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Old 01-23-2012, 04:50 PM   #59217
LucasLeader
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eakins View Post
i found bmw & ktm to be the exception to this.
I was on the hunt for some of the handguard mounts that go inside the bars and the local Japanese dealership only had the full mount kit. I decided to stop in the BMW dealership and asked if they had any. They didn't know what I was talking about and the girl at the counter told me "you're going to have to be more specific than that" with a confused look on her face. I don't think I could have been anymore specific than explaining what a handguard is and how they mount. She or the guy behind the counter held up some bar end caps and asked if I they were what I meant. I thought handguards would be common enough there with their big adventure market, but oh well. I would expect parts department employees to have some knowledge of accessories mainly, but would go back to the service department for any maintenance information. Even then I would still do some research online. Don't get me started on bargain hunting. I find myself only going in shops if it's worth it not to pay for shipping. As much as I'd like to support local businesses, I wouldn't be able afford half the stuff if I tried. I just bought some new riding gear online that was discounted well over 50% and there was free shipping. I generally don't find anything close to that in the stores.
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Old 01-23-2012, 05:26 PM   #59218
Mongle
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Location: North Carolina Y'all
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mklebel View Post
I just spooned on a new front tire recently. This was the first time with the SW Motech centerstand. I held onto the forks as I took the axle bolt and tire out because I had a hunch that it would tip forward. I was right. It did.

I just want to know why, because I've heard others have no problems swapping out front tires. I had a full IMS tank and tank bag with tools and such, but I'm not sure if removing the tank bag would have made a difference. Anybody have a centerstand with a full IMS tank and change a front tire?

Right now I'm just thankful I've only had to change rear tires while on the side of the road. I looked ridiculous trying to wrestle around a bike with 1 wheel. (hint, just take the gas tank off and tip it over on it's side)

Are you sure you have the center stand springs on properly? My SW stand balances the bike pretty good with no bags on it. If I take off the front tire it sits on the back tire...take off the back tire it sits on the front tire. No problems. I have even had both tires off and just put the swingarm on a block of wood. It is more stable then I expected it to be. My only complaint is that it is about 1" too short for when you run an aggressive knobbie (like 606).
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Old 01-23-2012, 06:14 PM   #59219
carcajou
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Quote:
Originally Posted by procycle View Post
Yeah, but those guys are just like the rest of us. I take a deep interest in dual sport bikes, flattrack racing, mini-supermoto, turbo-diesel motors and a few other oddball things. There's no way I could work up any enthusiasm or interest in chromed out cruisers, Harleys, trikes, full boat touring bikes, etc. There's no way I'm ever going to be knowledgeable about BMWs because I find nothing about them to be interesting. The salesmen working at the dealer are there because they know sales not because they know motorcycles.

The poor saps working at the parts counter really don't have a prayer of knowing very much about everything. For example, back in 1983 when I first started in the motorcycle business Honda had 52 current models for sale. They change up the mix every year with new stuff and of course the old models are all still running around out there. If I look in the model reference guide in the back of my Parts Unlimited off-road catalog there are approximately 750 models listed. The street catalog lists about 1000 models. Anyone who could educate themselves to a high level of knowledge on all those bikes is wasting their time selling parts at a dealership counter.

And of course our wonderful DR650s are barely a blip on any dealership radar. You're lucky if the dealer employees could recognize one (like those salesmen who didn't).

I'm not bitching about this, it's just a fact that most any dealership is going to be spread way too thin to be able to give good expert advice unless you get lucky and stumble into a dealer employee with the same passion as you have. This is not going to change. Dealers have to try to be everything to all customers but it isn't possible to actually do it.

This situation certainly helps my own business. We have structured ProCycle around the bikes that we all own and ride.
Exactly! I have a BMW R1150R, as well as my DR, the BMW sits taking up garage space and is for sale to anyone close to 5000 by the way, the BMW part guy at the local dealership is about as knowledgeable as my shoes. I got to the point if I wanted a part I looked up the parts fiche and copied down the part number and took him the number, so I did not have to endure him looking for the part and then finding the wrong one. We are all lucky to have ProCycle who cares about what we care about. AND they participate on our forum! Thanks to ProCycle for their participation on our forum and having the goodies we need to do whatever it is that we want with our DRs. Carcajou
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Old 01-23-2012, 09:37 PM   #59220
shu
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Joined: Feb 2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mklebel View Post
I just spooned on a new front tire recently. This was the first time with the SW Motech centerstand. I held onto the forks as I took the axle bolt and tire out because I had a hunch that it would tip forward. I was right. It did.

I just want to know why, because I've heard others have no problems swapping out front tires. I had a full IMS tank and tank bag with tools and such, but I'm not sure if removing the tank bag would have made a difference. Anybody have a centerstand with a full IMS tank and change a front tire?

Right now I'm just thankful I've only had to change rear tires while on the side of the road. I looked ridiculous trying to wrestle around a bike with 1 wheel. (hint, just take the gas tank off and tip it over on it's side)
I've not had that problem, maybe because I always have a little extra weight towards the back (tools, panniers, etc). Mine always sits back when I remove the front wheel.

I agree with Mongle that the stand is a little short- maybe your rear tire style/size is pushing the bike up and forward too much. I carry some very small plywood blocks (see pic) to help with this



.............shu
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