ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Bikes > Thumpers
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 05-14-2012, 06:30 PM   #64336
sagebrushocean
Harris's hawker
 
sagebrushocean's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2011
Location: jackrabbit country
Oddometer: 179
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tech23 View Post
How is that R6 throttle tube working out? I've wanted a quick turn throttle for my DR but I've read mixed reviews on how that R6 tube fits and functions with some experiencing sticking (idle stop) issues.

Tech23
I got one (5SL-26240-01) from ronayers.com, 2006 Yamaha R6 (with a matching left grip). I didn't have any of the fitment problems that others have reported -- it was plug 'n play. Just had to adjust the throttle pull cable to its maximum length. It's a very worthwhile, cost-effective modification for a street-ridden DR.
__________________
2008 DR650SE supermoto
2009 CRF230M
sagebrushocean is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2012, 07:43 PM   #64337
smilin jack
Grandpa Adventurer
 
smilin jack's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2008
Location: Lebanon Oregon
Oddometer: 1,221
Too Much Pressure

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mambo Dave View Post
Anything wrong with 30 or the max 33 psi in the rear to keep the rubber cool? Heat kills out tires down here in the summer time.
Found on several bikes in the barn that when you run a little too much pressure in the tires, the front cups quicker and the rear gets a nice flat spot down the middle much sooner. Figured out that it doesn't help to have too much pressure.

Just start at what Suzuki says and raise ONE TIRE about 2 psi and ride a while to see if you like it. If that helps, do the other tire up 2 psi and ride. That's how it's done for me. I carry the bicycle pump and air gauge all the time.

Dave
smilin jack is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2012, 08:57 PM   #64338
Mambo Dave
Backyard Adventurer
 
Mambo Dave's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2011
Location: Pompano Beach, FL
Oddometer: 4,121
Quote:
Originally Posted by smilin jack View Post
Found on several bikes in the barn that when you run a little too much pressure in the tires, the front cups quicker and the rear gets a nice flat spot down the middle much sooner. Figured out that it doesn't help to have too much pressure.

Just start at what Suzuki says and raise ONE TIRE about 2 psi and ride a while to see if you like it. If that helps, do the other tire up 2 psi and ride. That's how it's done for me. I carry the bicycle pump and air gauge all the time.

Dave
I'm going to agree with you on that front tire observation - but my experience was after running a front tire low (like, at 18 psi) on a streetbike for a good while, then finally checking the pressure and upping it... so i wasn't sure if that was what caused the cupping.

Thanks guys, I am probably headed 174 miles north to buy my first DR650 in about 14 hours here... I will remember the input your guys gave and not over-pressure the tires.

I'm nervous about it because it certainly isn't a set-up bike like all the recent DR's that have been sold through the ADVrider Flea market recently (so I'm looking at investing more money into it for suspension, seat, bars, luggage of some sort, chain sprockets, tires, etc.), but it is mechanic-owned, a 2002, and the whole reason he owns the bike is because the previous owner gave up on it after the base gasket leaked badly after an overfill of oil... so it purportedly has the new-style metal-like base gasket on it. I hope to get the bike for under $2800 or so... aftermarket exhaust, jetted, and that's about all of the mods I think.
__________________
"After reading through this thread I've come to the conclusion
that more people cruise the internet looking for reasons why
X bike won't work in Y scenario rather than actually riding
their motorcycles
." --
RyanR

Mambo Dave screwed with this post 05-14-2012 at 09:04 PM
Mambo Dave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2012, 09:28 PM   #64339
Tech23
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Tech23's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2007
Location: Arizona Desert
Oddometer: 458
Quote:
Originally Posted by sagebrushocean View Post
I got one (5SL-26240-01) from ronayers.com, 2006 Yamaha R6 (with a matching left grip). I didn't have any of the fitment problems that others have reported -- it was plug 'n play. Just had to adjust the throttle pull cable to its maximum length. It's a very worthwhile, cost-effective modification for a street-ridden DR.
Thanks sage, If you let the throttle snap back under it's own spring pressure it doesn't want to stick at idle? I sometimes wonder what was done to cause the malfunction during the install. Some have reported a difference in the two throttle tubes and some have found grinding on it necessary. I can't seem to get any clear cut answers. Wouldn't happen to have any pictures comparing the stock DR throttle tube to the R6 tube would you? I suppose the part is only available with the grip already mounted to the tube. Is the R6 grip is glued on, I would rather mount my Pro grips to the new throttle tube. I would be nice if Pro Cycle would offer a plastic version of their (aluminum) quick turn throttle specifically for the DR 650. Does the R6 part have flanges molded into the tube at each end for grip retention like the stock DR tube?

Tech23
__________________
CRF 150/230/ Supermoto Conversion
2004 Suzuki DR 650SM

2000 Harley Davidson FXDWG
2011 Victory Cross Country
Tech23 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2012, 09:44 PM   #64340
Tech23
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Tech23's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2007
Location: Arizona Desert
Oddometer: 458
Quote:
Originally Posted by BergDonk View Post
A story from a good mate who does among other things, suspension setup professionally. He was working for the Yamaha Aus road race team a few years ago, doing suspension and rider 'coaching'. Must have been about Jan/Feb 2006 when the then new Yam R6 came into their hands and they were at Eastern Creek testing in preparation for the season.

He had previously installed, among other things, the latest Ohlins fork kit to suit and was amazed that the single bolt bottom triple clamp was specced by Ohlins at 10 nm. 16nm is stock, which isn't a lot, and 10 is not much more than finger tight. He confirmed with Ohlins in Sweden that it wasn't a typo.

For safety sake, and for intial testing, he set the torque at 16 nm. His riders came in to the pits and the main feedback was that they weren't getting enough feel from the front end. We're talking national championship podium level riders, so they are fast, and know what they need.

The bikes were wheeled to the garage and the only changes made were to reduce the torque settings on the bottom triple clamp. The riders were not told what was changed each time, just go and have another go. 16-14-12 and when they went from 12 to 10, the Ohlins spec, the riders were happy, as were the crews. They were suddenly on or below lap record pace bringing the lap times down 3/4 secs and could feel the front end.

2 nm and nothing else, no clickers, nothing else!

Bike setup can be tricky, just ask Vale and JB.

Steve
Interesting Steve thanks, These were inverted forks I'm sure...I could see improper (over) torque binding things up for sure. From what I've gathered over the years is the major difference between a race bike and production bikes (besides exotic materials) is closer tolerances.

Over the years in the auto industry I have seen product recalls for nothing more than checking or changing a specific torque value for a specific fastener.

Tech23
__________________
CRF 150/230/ Supermoto Conversion
2004 Suzuki DR 650SM

2000 Harley Davidson FXDWG
2011 Victory Cross Country
Tech23 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2012, 09:54 PM   #64341
BergDonk
Beastly Adventurer
 
BergDonk's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2010
Location: Snowy Mountains Oz
Oddometer: 2,845
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tech23 View Post
Interesting Steve thanks, These were inverted forks I'm sure...I could see improper (over) torque binding things up for sure. From what I've gathered over the years is the major difference between a race bike and production bikes (besides exotic materials) is closer tolerances.

Over the years in the auto industry I have seen product recalls for nothing more than checking or changing a specific torque value for a specific fastener.

Tech23
Yep, USDs.

Its common to see USDs over tightened, Blue torque as noted previously, or BFT (Bloody F**** Tight) and that of course crushes the outer tube and if nothing else, results in a tight spot when the inner tube bush goes past and puts a 'spike' in the fork's travel. It also helps to have all the threads clean and lubed to get accurate torque settings, especially for low torques.

Steve
__________________
shed time IS quality time
BergDonk's DR650 BergDonk's XT1200Z
BergDonk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2012, 09:56 PM   #64342
notarat
Gnarly Adventurer
 
notarat's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2010
Location: Bluff City
Oddometer: 333
Quote:
Originally Posted by jungleplant View Post
channel locks go the other way to cinch when slip occurs , but you might know that and want it to slip

I figured if the bit seized in the drilling process the slippage would save my wrist from snapping.
notarat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2012, 10:10 PM   #64343
Rainier_runner
Epic Adventurer
 
Rainier_runner's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2011
Location: Yelm, Washington
Oddometer: 230
Quote:
Originally Posted by BergDonk View Post
Yep, USDs.

Its common to see USDs over tightened, Blue torque as noted previously, or BFT (Bloody F**** Tight) and that of course crushes the outer tube and if nothing else, results in a tight spot when the inner tube bush goes past and puts a 'spike' in the fork's travel. It also helps to have all the threads clean and lubed to get accurate torque settings, especially for low torques.

Steve
So this being said, what would be the torque spec for the triple clamps on my '03 Rm 125 forks I swapped out onto my 650? I can't say that they're not currently blue torqued with a short wrench. Which I'm guessing is extremely incorrect after all the previous posts.
__________________
2014 KTM 1190 Adventure R
2006 Suzuki DR 650 ADV
Rainier_runner is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2012, 10:16 PM   #64344
Tech23
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Tech23's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2007
Location: Arizona Desert
Oddometer: 458
Quote:
Originally Posted by BergDonk View Post
Yep, USDs.

Its common to see USDs over tightened, Blue torque as noted previously, or BFT (Bloody F**** Tight) and that of course crushes the outer tube and if nothing else, results in a tight spot when the inner tube bush goes past and puts a 'spike' in the fork's travel. It also helps to have all the threads clean and lubed to get accurate torque settings, especially for low torques.

Steve
Yep clean threads a dab of anti seize compound or oil (where a locking agent is not preferable) and a good torque wrench, besides giving a more accurate and uniform torque, it can mean the difference between a pleasant disassembly or a fight.

You bet it pinches the tubes...I learned that at a very early age. First time I went to remove a fork cap on an old Kawasaki G5 enduro....I fought to remove the cap with the top triple clamp still tightened down...LOL, live and learn.

Tech23
__________________
CRF 150/230/ Supermoto Conversion
2004 Suzuki DR 650SM

2000 Harley Davidson FXDWG
2011 Victory Cross Country
Tech23 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2012, 10:25 PM   #64345
Tech23
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Tech23's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2007
Location: Arizona Desert
Oddometer: 458
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rainier_runner View Post
So this being said, what would be the torque spec for the triple clamps on my '03 Rm 125 forks I swapped out onto my 650? I can't say that they're not currently blue torqued with a short wrench. Which I'm guessing is extremely incorrect after all the previous posts.
I would think the torque spec in the factory RM service manual would be applicable. Don't know what that spec might be but that should be the basis for your search. When you get the correct torque spec write it down somewhere like in your DR service manual under front suspension or somewhere in your owners manual.

I used to write the torque specs of all the common fasteners on a piece of making tape and place it inside my torque wrench carrying case.

Tech23
__________________
CRF 150/230/ Supermoto Conversion
2004 Suzuki DR 650SM

2000 Harley Davidson FXDWG
2011 Victory Cross Country
Tech23 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2012, 10:57 PM   #64346
ER70S-2
Beastly Adventurer
 
ER70S-2's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2009
Location: SE Denver-ish
Oddometer: 4,588
Why do I keep finding these posts at bedtime?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tech23 View Post
Thanks sage, If you let the throttle snap back under it's own spring pressure it doesn't want to stick at idle? I sometimes wonder what was done to cause the malfunction during the install. Some have reported a difference in the two throttle tubes and some have found grinding on it necessary. I can't seem to get any clear cut answers. Wouldn't happen to have any pictures comparing the stock DR throttle tube to the R6 tube would you? I suppose the part is only available with the grip already mounted to the tube. Is the R6 grip is glued on, I would rather mount my Pro grips to the new throttle tube. I would be nice if Pro Cycle would offer a plastic version of their (aluminum) quick turn throttle specifically for the DR 650. Does the R6 part have flanges molded into the tube at each end for grip retention like the stock DR tube?

Tech23
Throttle stops. This matters because the stops in the stock alum housing are on the outside diameter of the throttle tube. The smaller diameter R6 tube has slid past the stop under a high load (throttle off, landing from a bad jump for instance). Once that's happened, it easier for following hits to pass the stop. So far, so good for me; but I don't do airtime on the DR. Since it's slipping past the stop in the 'throttle off' direction, I'm guessing that you just force it back to the correct 'throttle off' position. I hope.


The difference between the outside diameter of the stock DR and the Yamaha.


I couldn't adjust the cables to get full throttle, I had to 'relocate' the WFO corner. I don't recommend a chisel, that plastic is really hard. I'm lucky it snapped where I wanted. The red arrow shows the oblong hole on mine, I don't know if they're all like that or mine was defective; anyone??



Motodeficient mentioned another Yamie part number in post 64321 on May 11th. I'll be curious to hear his feedback.

obtw: I'm still running the stock R6 grip on the right and the stock DR grip on the left. The only time I notice it is in the garage. The R6 grip looks like it could be slippery if wet.

Sorry, couldn't help myself.

__________________
2004 DR650: 59,205 miles of

SUZUKI DR650SE INFORMATION INDEX
Quote:
Originally Posted by Threewheelbonnie View Post
"BTW, I don't do style. It's a dirt bike, not some girlie dress-up thing." -
ER70S-2 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2012, 01:45 AM   #64347
Mambo Dave
Backyard Adventurer
 
Mambo Dave's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2011
Location: Pompano Beach, FL
Oddometer: 4,121
Quote:
Originally Posted by FatChance View Post
It gets real miserable here in the summer. Sometimes it gets to almost 90 degrees and the humidity can climb to 10%.
LOL, I just read this.

Yeah, I hate you, too.
__________________
"After reading through this thread I've come to the conclusion
that more people cruise the internet looking for reasons why
X bike won't work in Y scenario rather than actually riding
their motorcycles
." --
RyanR
Mambo Dave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2012, 01:57 AM   #64348
BergDonk
Beastly Adventurer
 
BergDonk's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2010
Location: Snowy Mountains Oz
Oddometer: 2,845
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tech23 View Post
I would think the torque spec in the factory RM service manual would be applicable. Don't know what that spec might be but that should be the basis for your search. When you get the correct torque spec write it down somewhere like in your DR service manual under front suspension or somewhere in your owners manual.

I used to write the torque specs of all the common fasteners on a piece of making tape and place it inside my torque wrench carrying case.

Tech23
Ditto

FWIW, the WP units on my Bergs and DR have the spec engraved on each triple clamp to maybe eliminate confusion.

Steve
__________________
shed time IS quality time
BergDonk's DR650 BergDonk's XT1200Z
BergDonk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2012, 02:22 AM   #64349
NordieBoy
Armature speller
 
NordieBoy's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2006
Location: Kiwiland
Oddometer: 7,061
Quote:
Originally Posted by Adv Grifter View Post
I've never used "Vibranators". Sounds like Snake Oil, but who knows?
Put them in, no problems. Pull them out, sore hands. Put them back in.

More of a difference on bars with solid mounts to the top clamp.
NordieBoy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2012, 02:23 AM   #64350
NordieBoy
Armature speller
 
NordieBoy's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2006
Location: Kiwiland
Oddometer: 7,061
Quote:
Originally Posted by Olas View Post
Here's some nice, USA made, anti-vibration inserts:

http://www.highwaydirtbikes.com/HDB_...f=Th_insert_av

Aluminum bars vibrate much less than steel does also...
Looks very similar to the Vibranators (also made in the USA).
NordieBoy is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 10:01 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014