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Old 12-03-2012, 06:15 PM   #71566
Mambo Dave
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Location: 11 ft. AMSL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Emmbeedee View Post

I wore out a set of pads on my bike and put in a replacement set and they felt terrible. No stopping power at all, until about 500 miles later when they had fully bedded in, and now they feel great. If your rotor is not new, then any replacement pad might feel weak for a while.

I think that's why you're cautioned to not brake hard for a while after replacing pads. You have to try to ease them into service...
Well, I've never read such a warning to not stop hard, or I've never paid attention to it.

I think you hit your 'cure' on the head and didn't realize it when you wrote about "bedding in." Why wouldn't anyone bed-in their new brake pads on their bikes like we all do (or should be doing) with our cars and trucks?

In a controlled environment, go through a brake pad bed-in process (there are different combinations of speeds and slowings, but they all work out to be the same), and be sure to then let the brakes cool down without stopping.

Heading out for any road riding without a bedding in having been done is crazy. Your instructions may be telling you to not stop hard, but what it's really telling you is to not expect to stop hard or well - reality means accidents don't cater to your calendar, and if an approaching 'accident' happens in your way while you're riding along at mile 10 of what turned out to be a 500-mile bed-in... what then?

Do brakes the right way - bed them in on the first use of the vehicle even if it means you have to head out at 1 or 3 AM in the morning to avoid traffic on your local roads and avoid having to come to a complete stop.

This isn't a secret of race teams; it's just the right way to finish a brake pad or rotor installation.
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Old 12-03-2012, 06:31 PM   #71567
eakins
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Skidmarkart View Post
My brakes are well, kinda sucky. They are also noisy (lots of squeaks and grinds as I stop). The stopping power is acceptable, but not breathtaking.

I have a couple of questions - first, is it possible my pads are worn-out in only 1000 miles? I haven't had bikes in about 15 years, but I don't seem to remember them wearing out that fast (of course that was a lot of cheeseburgers ago so I am heavier now).

If so, does anyone have recs on a set of pads? I don't really want to replace rotors etc, as they seem to be fine.

TIA for any info.
when you put new pads on, don't forget the clean the rotors with brake cleaner. all those holes can hold road grime that can be driven back into new pads and make them less than effective. many overlook this step.

braided brake lines help a bit but ultimately the front brake master cyl is an undersized bore (ie smaller) compared to other bikes and thus the breaking is not as good.
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Old 12-03-2012, 06:53 PM   #71568
dogjaw
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Originally Posted by neo1piv014 View Post
Where did you pick up a 17 front in that model? Looks like they have them in 16,18, and 21 fronts. For commuting, those look like really nice tires.
I love the 705's on a 19"; does great on the road as well as the dirt
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Old 12-03-2012, 07:16 PM   #71569
PPCLI-Jim
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The Braided Steel front brake line gets rid of some of the issues because of line expansion.Fluid being non-compressible will cause a old worn line to expand and thus reduce pressure in the brake wheel cylinder. Another issue is if its the rear wheel they may of picked up oils from the oiling of the chain unless its done carefully. I also agree with the fact that they MAY require a bed in time my EBC did the same thing as I got oil on the originals I pulled them out completely cleaned the disc, then put on the new pads. Took a dew days to get bedded but then they are great. Lesson learned about oiling the chain.
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Old 12-04-2012, 01:00 AM   #71570
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PPCLI-Jim View Post
The Braided Steel front brake line gets rid of some of the issues because of line expansion.Fluid being non-compressible will cause a old worn line to expand and thus reduce pressure in the brake wheel cylinder. Another issue is if its the rear wheel they may of picked up oils from the oiling of the chain unless its done carefully. I also agree with the fact that they MAY require a bed in time my EBC did the same thing as I got oil on the originals I pulled them out completely cleaned the disc, then put on the new pads. Took a dew days to get bedded but then they are great. Lesson learned about oiling the chain.
I oiled down a set of new pads when a fork seal went out. Rinsed them off in brake clean, dropped them in my mill and knocked a few thou off and stuck them back in. Just because you oiled them down doesn't mean they are done.
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Old 12-04-2012, 05:26 AM   #71571
Mongle
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I have found that the rotors get a 'glaze' on them after a while. When I install new pads I always scuff up the rotors too. 220 grit usually does the job. I sand accross the path of the pad; NOT with it.

Seems like when I ride in the rain a lot the brakes get shitty. Don't know if it is from the rain or the road grime getting on them. I will take the pads off and scuff them with 100 grit and do the rotors with 220, wash everything in brake cleaner and go through my own bedding procedure. Seems to bring old pads back to life a little.

It is always good to check the calipers now and then. If they are not releasing all the way it will cause the pad to drag which will glaze the pad/rotors. It also creates a lot of undue heat.
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Old 12-04-2012, 05:44 AM   #71572
macrae85
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dogjaw View Post
I love the 705's on a 19"; does great on the road as well as the dirt
What make of disc is that?
19" is that way to go,the happy medium between road and dirt!
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Old 12-04-2012, 06:37 AM   #71573
barko1
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TRAVELGUY View Post
My guess is your pads are contaminated with dirt, grease, oil, soap or something. Had sucky brakes on my current DR and after changing to new pads I am very happy with my brakes. I hear many people talk about braided lines but I see no need for them on my DR with new pads and clean disk,

TravelGuy

I've put brided lines on a couple different bikes and the DR is the one that it seemed to help most. Maybe because the line was probably the original 98. Pleased with the result.
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Old 12-04-2012, 06:46 AM   #71574
barko1
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Albie View Post
Corbin's more comfortable then the stocker, but it sucks when you have to do a lot of standing up.

After this discussion I was out on the DR and took the dirt route home and remembered to pay attention to the Corbin while standing. Maybe I'm bowlegged or others made have fat calves but I could never even notice the seat.
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Old 12-04-2012, 07:17 AM   #71575
neo1piv014
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Wheel Bearings

My bike has been feeling rather rough lately. It's hard to peg down, but it just feels like everything is..well, rough. I'm planning on trying to smooth things out over the winter holidays so here's my projected list of upgrades:
- Oil change to a synthetic instead of the dino oil I've got now (rough shifting)
- Wheel bearings (wheels don't want to spin very well and make an odd noise)
- Cush drive rubbers (again, rough shifting and harsh throttle jerk)
- Carb rebuild (a lot of surging, and I know for sure that my pilot needle is a bit bent)

My bike is a 2001, and the carb, bearings, and rubbers all appear to be the original parts. Is there anything else I should be looking for in terms of just tightening up the ship and making it ride a bit smoother? None of it looks terribly difficult, though I haven't ever done wheel bearings before. Is there anything I should keep an eye out for there?
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Old 12-04-2012, 07:44 AM   #71576
Rob.G
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Re: brakes.

I've never been terribly impressed with the DR650's brakes. My rear brake is awful. I've rebuilt it, bled it repeatedly, put on a braided line, new pads, etc, and still there's too much pedal travel. I guess I'll rebuild the caliper next, and if that doesn't fix it, replace the master cylinder.

The front brakes are just so-so. My KLX250S's front brake is vastly superior.

Still, when I put new brakes on, I always go out and bed them in properly, bike or car. I read that you want to do 4-6 back to back stops from about 40-50 mph down to 10-20 mph (depending on traffic). Get 'em good and warm. Then drive for 15-20 min without using them (if possible) to let them cool. Then park overnight. After that, you should be good to go.

Rob
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Old 12-04-2012, 07:51 AM   #71577
Skidmarkart
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Thanks for all the replies - bike is pretty new (2005 with 1K miles), so I seriously doubt they are work out. Maybe I will give cleaning a try before I buy anything new. I ride to work in pretty much any weather, so they get wet a lot. Perhaps a good cleaning will help before I start buying stuff.
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Old 12-04-2012, 08:16 AM   #71578
barko1
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Quote:
Originally Posted by neo1piv014 View Post
My bike has been feeling rather rough lately. It's hard to peg down, but it just feels like everything is..well, rough. I'm planning on trying to smooth things out over the winter holidays so here's my projected list of upgrades:

See the recent thread on brakes as well, might have some sticking causing drag.
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Old 12-04-2012, 08:47 AM   #71579
maynard911
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sagebrushocean View Post
+1 on the braided brake line, at least for the front. I ride my DR almost exclusively on the street, and the braided lines give much better control and braking power. Night and day difference.
Braided lines do not improve braking power. The power is determined by the master/slave ratio. The improvement that we feel when replacing an old rubber line is all controlability, without the the expansion the feel becomes more direct and lever travel is reduced. The difference is not that big if we are talking about a near new stock line that has not softened as they do with age.

Quote:
Originally Posted by eakins View Post
braided brake lines help a bit but ultimately the front brake master cyl is an undersized bore (ie smaller) compared to other bikes and thus the breaking is not as good.
You are thinking backwards, a smaller master will give more power, at the expense of more lever travel. Kind of like a smaller primary sprocket gives more power at the expense of more revs. There was a great write up about how it all works in Motorcycle Consumer News a few months back. The real subject of the artical was about radial master cylinders and how they can improve braking, and the test mule was a DR 650.
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Old 12-04-2012, 09:00 AM   #71580
MikeyP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by maynard911 View Post
There was a great write up about how it all works in Motorcycle Consumer News a few months back. The real subject of the artical was about radial master cylinders and how they can improve braking, and the test mule was a DR 650.
Interesting read. Thanks for pointing it out. Here's a link:

http://www.mcnews.com/mcn/technical/Nov2012Tech.pdf
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