ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Bikes > Thumpers
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 05-28-2013, 04:10 PM   #77101
ram1000
Beastly Adventurer
 
ram1000's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2004
Location: Tricities Washington
Oddometer: 1,821
You can also have fork tubes straightened with a press.
__________________
A good adventure bike will get you to where you wish you had a good dirt bike! (and back)
:2014 XC800 :2012 WR450
ram1000 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-28-2013, 04:20 PM   #77102
Adv Grifter
on the road o'dreams
 
Adv Grifter's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2010
Location: Passing ADV Stalkers in California
Oddometer: 6,128
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carl Childers View Post
You have a good chance that nothing is bent simply misaligned which careful reassembly procedure cures. Fork tubes can be checked for straightness on a flat surface using a feeler gauge between the tube and the surface as tube gets rolled on that surface. Most often a bent tube is fairly easy to spot with the naked eye. If one of the tubes is bent I'd replace it. Once you have established that the tubes are straight mount them in the triple trees and see that they run parallel on all planes if not you have a bent tree which can be straightened by a practiced hand if not too bad, a novice would be better off replacing the triple tree.

Again unless there has been a severe front impact don't lose sight of the fact that there is probably nothing bent, only binding from misalignment.
Excellent comments!
Also, don't ignore your rubber mounted handle bars. These too can fool you, acting like bent fork tubes or bent handlebars. The Bars are rubber mounted. Bolts extend down through the bottom bar clamp, down through the TOP triple clamp. The Rubber bushings are under the upper triple. In a fall, if the bars hit on the ground, they can be tweaked. This will have the bike going down the road crooked (bars crooked). A simple PUSH on opposite lock will straighten them out. Go against the stop and push. Ride to check if true or not. Adjust as needed.

Adv Grifter screwed with this post 05-28-2013 at 07:54 PM
Adv Grifter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-28-2013, 06:08 PM   #77103
Emmbeedee
Procrastinators
 
Emmbeedee's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2008
Location: Near Ottawa, ON, Canada
Oddometer: 9,079
Oh the joys of DR650 Ownership!

Tonight I set out to change the engine oil in my DR and after all the work of going for a nice 1/2 hour ride to get the oil warm, and putting a pan under the engine and pulling the drain plug then letting gravity takes its course, I thought about how much work I used to have to do to change the oil on my BMW R1150GS.
  1. Go for a ride to warm up oil
  2. Put bike on centre stand
  3. Remove seat
  4. Disconnect fuel lines
  5. Disconnect wiring to fuel pump
  6. Remove fuel tank (Why did I just fill it?)
  7. Remove front engine guard bolts
  8. Remove four bottom engine guard bolts
  9. Take bike off centre stand or else engine bash plate won't come off
  10. Remove engine guard
  11. Remove engine bash plate
  12. Put bike back on centre stand
  13. Remove oil filter
  14. Remove engine drain plug
  15. Go lie down for a while after all that work, to give oil time to drain.
Yikes!

And that doesn't even take into account the transmission oil, the final drive oil, etc!

Even more recently when I had a F800GS, it was a lot less work but I still had to completely remove the engine bash plate to get to the drain plug and oil filter...

I am SO glad I now have a DR650!
__________________
Want to know more about the Garmin Montana? See the Wisdom and FAQ Thread.
Want to know more about the Garmin VIRB? See here.
"The motorcycle, being poorly designed for both flight and marine operation, sustained significant external and internal damage," police noted.
Emmbeedee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-28-2013, 06:10 PM   #77104
ketur
dat stonk
 
ketur's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2013
Location: Oregon USA
Oddometer: 28
Going to stop working on the forks for now, but all is looking good so far; bushings are worn as predicted but I have replacements. I haven't checked if the forks are bent but one guy at Procycle convinced me it takes a lot more force than some drops in the woods to bend a fork. They moved freely once I had them off the wheel, too. I'm not worried about that anymore. The fork tubes came apart quite easily though... I thought that was supposed to take some force. Oh well.

One of the forks has a stripped screw underneath. So mad at how many stripped screws I've found on this bike. Going to look up solutions to this problem... I can only repair one fork right now because of this.

The fork caps were insanely tight too, although maybe that's normal. Either way my hands were starting to be sore from various attemps so I added a little leverage...



And here's a random bonus image of how you know it's time to crack open the forks...


ketur screwed with this post 05-28-2013 at 06:29 PM
ketur is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-28-2013, 06:29 PM   #77105
victor441
Studly Adventurer
 
victor441's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2009
Location: Sonoma, Calif.
Oddometer: 841
Quote:
Originally Posted by ketur View Post
Going to stop working on the forks for now, but all is looking good so far besides the scoring (more like strange discoloration) where the bushings rested, which were indeed worn out as well (namely the smaller one). I haven't checked if the forks are bent but one guy at Procycle convinced me it takes a lot more force than some drops in the woods to bend a fork. They moved freely once I had them off the wheel, too. I'm not worried about that anymore.

One of the forks has a stripped screw underneath. So mad at how many stripped screws I've found on this bike. Going to look up solutions to this problem... I can only repair one fork right now because of this.

The fork caps were insanely tight too, although maybe that's normal. Either way my hands were starting to be sore from various attemps so I added a little leverage...

And here's a random bonus image of how you know it's time to crack open the forks...

]
Try sliding some 35mm film under the fork seals to clean them before replacing the seals....mine were leaking pretty badly due to mud and that did the trick, no more leaks....I also changed the fork oil soon after that as the film forces the dirt into the forks
victor441 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-28-2013, 08:02 PM   #77106
ketur
dat stonk
 
ketur's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2013
Location: Oregon USA
Oddometer: 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by victor441 View Post
Try sliding some 35mm film under the fork seals to clean them before replacing the seals....mine were leaking pretty badly due to mud and that did the trick, no more leaks....I also changed the fork oil soon after that as the film forces the dirt into the forks
I read about that technique; I'll keep it in mind next time my forks leak, but this was not only leaking up choppy performance. Best start fresh in this case. I wondered why my front wheel felt like it wanted to slip out from under me when I rode it home for the first time.
ketur is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-28-2013, 08:03 PM   #77107
Adv Grifter
on the road o'dreams
 
Adv Grifter's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2010
Location: Passing ADV Stalkers in California
Oddometer: 6,128
Quote:
Originally Posted by ketur View Post
Going to stop working on the forks for now, but all is looking good so far; bushings are worn as predicted but I have replacements. I haven't checked if the forks are bent but one guy at Procycle convinced me it takes a lot more force than some drops in the woods to bend a fork. They moved freely once I had them off the wheel, too. I'm not worried about that anymore. The fork tubes came apart quite easily though... I thought that was supposed to take some force. Oh well.

One of the forks has a stripped screw underneath. So mad at how many stripped screws I've found on this bike. Going to look up solutions to this problem... I can only repair one fork right now because of this.

The fork caps were insanely tight too, although maybe that's normal. Either way my hands were starting to be sore from various attemps so I added a little leverage...

And here's a random bonus image of how you know it's time to crack open the forks...

Your fork oil looks very fresh and NEW. Someone must have recently changed it for it to run so clear ... or perhaps the bike hasn't been ridden much lately?

The tight fork caps could be corroded ... or some numb nuts cranked down on them. They DO NOT need to be very tight.

What is stripped? Did you strip it ...or you found it stripped?
Forks aren't bent. You are about the hundreth guy here to think his forks are bent. The Pro Cycle guy is correct ... takes a NASTY crash or Odd hit to bend fork tubes. But they routinely "twist" within the triple clamps ... and bars can appear bent due to rubber damper inserts. Both things fool new riders.
Adv Grifter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-28-2013, 08:15 PM   #77108
Adv Grifter
on the road o'dreams
 
Adv Grifter's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2010
Location: Passing ADV Stalkers in California
Oddometer: 6,128
Quote:
Originally Posted by ketur View Post
I read about that technique; I'll keep it in mind next time my forks leak, but this was not only leaking up choppy performance. Best start fresh in this case. I wondered why my front wheel felt like it wanted to slip out from under me when I rode it home for the first time.
A NOTE for anyone who is out riding and finds a leaky fork seal.
You can try to clean the seal (use film or rotating upper tube within lower tube, moving leak point) If you can't get it to stop ... not only can oil get on your tire but will eventually contaminate your brake rotor. NOT GOOD. Here is the quick and easy fix to get you home ... or even further.

Rags and Zip ties. Zip tie strips of rags just below the fork seal. Wrap them round the fork leg, fasten securely. Change to clean rags as needed. (usually once a day)

I rode 300 miles on rough Baja off road this way. Eventually the fork will pump out most of the oil and suspension will suffer ... but until then ... at least you've got brakes and no oil on your tire.
Adv Grifter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-28-2013, 11:01 PM   #77109
ketur
dat stonk
 
ketur's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2013
Location: Oregon USA
Oddometer: 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Adv Grifter View Post
Your fork oil looks very fresh and NEW. Someone must have recently changed it for it to run so clear ... or perhaps the bike hasn't been ridden much lately?

The tight fork caps could be corroded ... or some numb nuts cranked down on them. They DO NOT need to be very tight.

What is stripped? Did you strip it ...or you found it stripped?
Forks aren't bent. You are about the hundreth guy here to think his forks are bent. The Pro Cycle guy is correct ... takes a NASTY crash or Odd hit to bend fork tubes. But they routinely "twist" within the triple clamps ... and bars can appear bent due to rubber damper inserts. Both things fool new riders.
The oil gets worse when dumped into a container, although I agree it's not nearly as black as I expected. In any case this work needed to be done, not only because of the leak but because the suspension was technically dangerous.

The fork caps look okay when I took them off. I'm surprised the threads aren't stripped or anything. A lot of screws on this bike are insanely tight, and other times insanely loose (like the rear axle nut...).

The screw at the bottom of a fork I found stripped. The crankcase's plugs for the timing are stripped too, and one even has a chisel-mark as a last attempt to unscrew it. I can't believe people maintain their bikes this way...
ketur is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-29-2013, 02:12 AM   #77110
scotteroni
Gnarly Adventurer
 
scotteroni's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2011
Location: Hinsdale, NH
Oddometer: 114
I have an interesting observation since I bought a dr650 especially among my street bike riding friends. Because the bike looks more like a dirt bike than a dualsport I think they automatically assume its not suitable for a 3 hr ride on pavement or that I'm not going to be able to keep up with The pace. Five of us are going to Americade next week and every one them asked if I was taking the dr instead of cb900 as if I was little crazy. Anyone else had these type of reactions from street bike riders? Btw the dr is a blast through the twistys!
scotteroni is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-29-2013, 03:11 AM   #77111
DockingPilot
Hooked Up and Hard Over
 
DockingPilot's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2004
Location: Andover, N.J.
Oddometer: 9,221
Quote:
Originally Posted by scotteroni View Post
I have an interesting observation since I bought a dr650 especially among my street bike riding friends. Because the bike looks more like a dirt bike than a dualsport I think they automatically assume its not suitable for a 3 hr ride on pavement or that I'm not going to be able to keep up with The pace. Five of us are going to Americade next week and every one them asked if I was taking the dr instead of cb900 as if I was little crazy. Anyone else had these type of reactions from street bike riders? Btw the dr is a blast through the twistys!
Yep. This past weekend I rode with a good friend who belongs to the "Sport Touring MC". At the start were all big twins, Ducati's, and Interceptor, KTM SM and Duke and more. These fellas ride hot, real hot. At the end of a all day 300 miler, not once did they shake the DR loose. I was right there every time they looked in the mirrors. In fact I was able to take a few small short cuts through the woods and rejoin the route. They were slack jawed when they saw me waiting on them !
Well, until we got on the super slab at the end when we all split up. Then the faded from view
The DR is truly versatile.

At the start of a 300 mile day with the big boys:
__________________
Frank Reinbold

"Every bike I ever had, was the best bike I ever had, when I had it"
DockingPilot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-29-2013, 04:39 AM   #77112
dresda
shut up and RIDE!
 
dresda's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2008
Location: South Eastern Shore of Ontario
Oddometer: 960
Quote:
Originally Posted by scotteroni View Post
Btw the dr is a blast through the twistys!
Yes! The twister the better. It's a very nimble bike! There is no rule saying you can only ride a DR in gravel :)




Sent via aldis lamp on Tapatalk
__________________
Stephanie
'01 Suzuki DR650 (Patsy Q), '11 VW Golf TDI Wagon
'....and I shall baffle you with cabbages and rhinoceroses in the kitchen, incessant quotations from "Now We Are Six" through the mouthpiece of Lord Snooty's giant, poisoned, electric head. ' from My Pink Half of the Drainpipe by Bonzo Dog Doo Dah Band.
dresda is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-29-2013, 05:01 AM   #77113
DockingPilot
Hooked Up and Hard Over
 
DockingPilot's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2004
Location: Andover, N.J.
Oddometer: 9,221
Well I decided to ditch the Utah / Ricochet bash plate. IMHO it is a poorly designed plate and obviously low cost was paramount over protection when they decided to not go all the way back to the OEM threaded bosses and use those cheap ass brackets.

These even when positioned in that very small channel in the engine case is begging to to crack the case on impact. I believe this just happened to someone here recently. I mean, if your going to produce and sell a bash plate, make it, well "bash proof" or don't bother. Yes, it will survive and protect most riders bikes, but why take that chance when you simply have other, better choices I say.
So I bought a Pat Walsh Design plate. Way better in all regards.


Rubber bushings.



Notice the rubber sandwiched above plate, an old inner tube, I cut it, folded it in half and positioned it between the frame and the plate. Just because I could.


Oh, and my oil level is not too high. The bike is just not on a even keel on the lift is all.



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
__________________
Frank Reinbold

"Every bike I ever had, was the best bike I ever had, when I had it"

DockingPilot screwed with this post 05-29-2013 at 05:08 AM
DockingPilot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-29-2013, 05:25 AM   #77114
rpet
Awesometown
 
rpet's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2010
Location: Brooklyn, California
Oddometer: 809
^ How do you feel about the oil filter protection on that skid plate?
__________________
'76 Xl250 '04 XR250R '09 DR650 '10 TR450
Ride The West - OBDR, CDR & western TAT - July 2013
Instagram with plenty of bike pics.
Read my homie's underway Africa trip RR - Round Africa with a Surboard
WTB: Clarke tank for DR650 for cheap - any color but blue.
rpet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-29-2013, 05:48 AM   #77115
DockingPilot
Hooked Up and Hard Over
 
DockingPilot's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2004
Location: Andover, N.J.
Oddometer: 9,221
Quote:
Originally Posted by rpet View Post
^ How do you feel about the oil filter protection on that skid plate?
Good question. And let me say, my opinion is just that. Doesn't make it so.
But it looks like flak from the front tire will be stopped. Meaning coming in from that angle. A stone coming from dead on, meaning on the same plane as the ground, it is exposed. But the Utah plate also left some of the filter housing exposed to that trajectory as well, but to a lesser degree.
__________________
Frank Reinbold

"Every bike I ever had, was the best bike I ever had, when I had it"
DockingPilot is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 12:03 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014