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Old 07-10-2013, 09:14 PM   #78586
NWBoon
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Joined: Sep 2009
Location: Pacific NW
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Quote:
Originally Posted by YnotJP? View Post
The Postman came this afternoon with a Cogent shock and the 7.5 spring.

The hardest part of the installation was replacing the rubber boots on the carb and air box.

I only had a chance for a 10 mile ride around West Seattle, but, it is easy to see that it will be a big improvement. I was looking for bad places in the streets, and I was able to find many.
I think I spoke with you at the West Seattle Safeway parking lot a few weeks ago (right before the Touratech Rally). I also purchased the Cogent product for my DR shock. I did the rebuild kit route but haven't replaced the stock spring yet. I think Beach Drive between Lincoln Park and Alki Beach lighthouse is the bumpiest stretch of road in West Seattle. I tested my new shock on that road and at Discovery Park in the Magnolia neighborhood before I rode it up to the Rally on the other side of the Cascade Mountains.

The DR with the Cogent shock handled the easy and intermediate Touratech classified rides very well and was worth every dollar.
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Old 07-10-2013, 09:17 PM   #78587
OneEffinName
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Foot dragger View Post
So the DR250/350 has a rubber cush hub I guess? And they have proven strong enough for a heavy 650?
I also wonder if theres enough room under the fender for an 18" wheel/tire and maybe a DOT trials tire?

Buchanon's can spoke you a wheel or even send you the right spokes to do it yourself.
Lots have done the DR350 wheel with success - its the same hub, just a 2.15 rim. Diameter of my intended tire is about the same as a D606.

I see Buchanans will do a spoke set for about $80 and then a rim for $150 (if I am lucky). I was hoping someone knows of a moose rim or cheaper brand that will fit.
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Old 07-10-2013, 09:25 PM   #78588
ShadyRascal
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Right now I'm trying DuPont Teflon Chain Lube which is wax based. It was highly recommended in several places I read, so I'm giving it a whirl. I have new chain & sprockets on 3 bikes so we'll see....I don't have enough miles on any of them yet to make any judgments. However, it does leave white sticky stuff on both chains and sprockets.

Until now I've just taken ATF and really doused the chain with it, then left it to drip off for a while on my oil catcher tray, then wiped clean. It worked well enough, I got over 18,000 miles on my stock DR650 chain with this method.
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Old 07-11-2013, 12:48 AM   #78589
BergDonk
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Location: Snowy Mountains Oz
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrBob View Post
Okay, I got my clutch cover gasket and oil line O ring from Rocky Mtn. If I understand this procedure correctly:
Drain the oil.
Remove oil lines.
Remove anything else that interferes with removal of clutch cover.
Remove clutch cover.
Block hole where things could get lost.
Either remove the clutch, or not.
Replace sending unit screws and blue Locktite them in.
Reinstall clutch cover and don't screw up the bolt location.
Reinstall oil lines and rear brake pedal.
Refill with oil of my choice.
Check for leaks.

Does that sound about right?
Quote:
Originally Posted by YnotJP? View Post
MrBob, remember, do one screw at a time, as there is a spring behind the unit. The idea of tracing the gasket and putting the screws in the proper order will make installing the cover a lot easier.

Have Fun...
And when replacing the cover, remember to align the clitch pushrod rack with the actuation shaft.

I also like to use grease on the gasket as a sealant and an aid to removal later. Some only grease one side, usually the engine side so that the gasket comes off with the cover.
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Old 07-11-2013, 12:54 AM   #78590
BergDonk
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My Chain Blurb FWIW

Chains wear and get longer as they do, and often wrongly referred to as stretch, which implies some form of elastic recovery, whatever.

A good wear indicator is pulling on the chain, away from the rear of the rear sprocket. If you expose a half tooth or so, itís probably time to spend some $s

Chains can have tight spots, or parts that have worn less, but it can also be an out of round sprocket that is the problem. Adjust when tightest, but if the tight spot moves, its a sprocket problem because one or both are out of round.

Alternatively, or the same depending on your terminology and perception, a chain can have loose spots. They're usually from a link or more wearing more due to a loss of lubrication. These are the weak links that will encourage a chain to break when the pins wear/stress excessively.

Tensile strength is a chain spec, but not necessarily and indicator of life. Other steel properties like ductility and hardness are more relevant, and not readily quoted in specs.

Sealed, O ring type chains are not completely sealed. Chains wear firstly between the pins and bush, which is sealed by the O ring, but then the roller spins on the bush and itís not sealed. The roller then contacts the sprocket and itís obviously not sealed either.


When lubing a chain, lube it on the inside of the run aiming towards the side plates each side to encourage lube to get down between the roller and pin. Then lube is centrifuged out between the side plate and rollers, and then some gets into the roller bush area. Lubing on the outside means some lube gets between the roller and sprocket teeth and the rest gets flung off.

If you donít over lube your chain, cleaning them is unnecessary.

And even if you think cleaning a chain is a good idea, more often than not, and depending on technique, it promotes wear by forcing crud down past the side plates and between the rollers and pin, and can damage the O rings too.

Changing out a counter shaft sprocket at least 3 times to a chain and rear sprocket is a cost effective way of increasing the total life. CS sprockets wear faster because they have about 1/3 the number of teeth to deal with the same transmission loads as the rear sprocket. They are in effect the weakest link.

Use the biggest cs sprocket you can, more teeth and bigger diameter equals less wear.

Over tightening of chains is chronic in my experience. Regular tightening of your chain likely means you have it too tight to start with. An over tight chain wears it and the sprockets prematurely, and puts extra loads and therefore wear on the wheel bearings, countershaft and countershaft bearing, and compromises the rear suspension operation as the loads are transferred to the engine cases instead of the spring and damper.



Chain adjustment and tension is not dependant on load, just the geometry above. Chains should be adjusted when all 3 pivot points, ie the countershaft, swingarm pivot and rear axle are in line because thatís when the distance from the axle to the countershaft is greatest. Works for all motorcycles with chain or belt drive, even those with a coaxial css.

Modern chains rarely need adjusting. Once they do, its normally time to spend $s
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Old 07-11-2013, 05:36 AM   #78591
ninepeaks9
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On the fence

Hey all experienced DR650 riders,

I'm on fence whether to acquire a DR650. I recently bought a Super Sherpa. I'm planning a Western TAT next year. Coming from riding street bikes all my life, I thought starting out with a small DS was the way to go. I have no doubt Sherpa will do fine once I get to the trail. Problem is getting to & from the trail. I'm thinking DR650 will be better suited for the job. How I'm gonna like it on the trail is another question. I've 30 in inseam and weigh 200lb. Any feedback would be appreciated.
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Old 07-11-2013, 05:48 AM   #78592
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ninepeaks9 View Post
Hey all experienced DR650 riders,

I'm on fence whether to acquire a DR650. I recently bought a Super Sherpa. I'm planning a Western TAT next year. Coming from riding street bikes all my life, I thought starting out with a small DS was the way to go. I have no doubt Sherpa will do fine once I get to the trail. Problem is getting to & from the trail. I'm thinking DR650 will be better suited for the job. How I'm gonna like it on the trail is another question. I've 30 in inseam and weigh 200lb. Any feedback would be appreciated.
Heavier and taller than your Super Sherpa but quite capable with the right tires. It really depends a great deal on the weather. If it's wet, you'll like a lighter bike. It will handle the pavement portions far better. I rode the TAT on a DR350 (from near you in NE TN) but there were two companions on DR650s and one on a XR650 that did just fine. It's not so far from SW VA to the start in Tellico Plains. BUT, how are you gonna get back????
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Old 07-11-2013, 05:55 AM   #78593
ninepeaks9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thump! View Post
Heavier and taller than your Super Sherpa but quite capable with the right tires. It really depends a great deal on the weather. If it's wet, you'll like a lighter bike. It will handle the pavement portions far better. I rode the TAT on a DR350 (from near you in NE TN) but there were two companions on DR650s and one on a XR650 that did just fine. It's not so far from SW VA to the start in Tellico Plains. BUT, how are you gonna get back????
I'll prolly ship the bike back when I get to Oregon. I may just leave it at my buddy's place in Seattle if he let's me. BTW, I plan to do only western portion of TAT from CO to OR.
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Old 07-11-2013, 06:34 AM   #78594
Foot dragger
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Location: chico,just below rag dump(nor-cal)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thump! View Post
Pre '98 DR350S and SE models use the same hub as does the 650. The wheel itself is slightly more narrow. Diameter is not a problem as the change in radius is only .5".
This is good info,Ive got an old parts bike DR250 out in the shed but its the dirt model unfortunately.
I would like to use the Pirelli DOT trials tire for off road pursuits on the DR.
Be nice if they made a fat 17" version of this tire.
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Old 07-11-2013, 06:38 AM   #78595
Rusty Rocket
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Location: Northcentral CT
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OneEffinName View Post
Lots have done the DR350 wheel with success - its the same hub, just a 2.15 rim. Diameter of my intended tire is about the same as a D606.

I see Buchanans will do a spoke set for about $80 and then a rim for $150 (if I am lucky). I was hoping someone knows of a moose rim or cheaper brand that will fit.
Suzuki spoke set for the DR350 is about $55. Find an 18" rim and go for it.

I found a DR350 wheel for a real deal several years ago. No clearance issues ever. (I did have to buy another DR650 brake rotor because they aren't interchangable)
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Old 07-11-2013, 06:53 AM   #78596
acesandeights
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ninepeaks9 View Post
I'll prolly ship the bike back when I get to Oregon. I may just leave it at my buddy's place in Seattle if he let's me. BTW, I plan to do only western portion of TAT from CO to OR.
Keep in touch if you need a place to leave the bike for the shipping company to pick up.
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Old 07-11-2013, 07:13 AM   #78597
Foot dragger
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Location: chico,just below rag dump(nor-cal)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Adv Grifter View Post
I went through various Chain Wax products back in the 80's and early 90's. I never wore out chains more quickly. I got all that stuff free to test and review. Lots of negatives from other staff on Chain Wax.

Around town riding I use the Dupont Teflon spray. It's good and doesn't pick up much grit. But needs re-application frequently ... 400 mile days are out.

By now I'm sure there are BETTER Chain Wax type products out there.
Which one do you use?

Anything that stays on ... and does not collect Grit ... and never needs to be re-applied ... has got to be a miracle product!

funny though, I get more miles out of my chains and sprockets than just about any of my riding buddies (The Experts ). Now why is that? (never last to breakfast!)
I have used the Maxima for years,I dont over do it so not much mess to deal with,spray it on while chain is hot,let it set up overnight and its good for 600 miles or so.
It seems the better the chain the longer it lasts,20,000 miles is doable with just the chain wax. Good steel sprockets and heavy duty o-ring chain.
I will sometimes wipe down the outer chain plates with WD-40 as some overspray gets on there.

I remember buying cheap chains and using oil out of an old pump can as a kid,oil flinging everywhere,chain rollers popping off,cheap is cheap and will always be so.

I just bought a cherry 1250 Suzuki Bandit,the bike is great but it looked like they dumped engine oil on the chain then drove through some freshly laid hot tar. The back half of the bike had thick oily grit everywhere. An hour of cleaning with solvent and it looks much happier.

I tried that Dupont spray,it seemed to dis-appear and not really do much,maybe if it gets applied really often.

Chain wax,like anything, is a mess if you soak and soak the chain in it,enough is enough.
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Old 07-11-2013, 07:24 AM   #78598
ninepeaks9
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Originally Posted by acesandeights View Post
Keep in touch if you need a place to leave the bike for the shipping company to pick up.
I sure will. Thanks!
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Old 07-11-2013, 07:33 AM   #78599
DockingPilot
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If your using Allied (Federal) like I did, they have a hub in Portland. Once I finished the TAT, I rode to Portland and right into the warehouse, put my bike on the pallet, secured it and took a cab to the airport. No fuss, no muss.
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Old 07-11-2013, 07:38 AM   #78600
ninepeaks9
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Originally Posted by DockingPilot View Post
If your using Allied (Federal) like I did, they have a hub in Portland. Once I finished the TAT, I rode to Portland and right into the warehouse, put my bike on the pallet, secured it and took a cab to the airport.
Thanks for that info! That sounds like the way to do it. Shipping the bike to my starting point in CO is the tricky part.
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