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Old 07-20-2013, 07:57 AM   #78916
996DL
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Location: too far from the Rockies...
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tlmaffucci View Post
Well, after intensive research on what bike to purchase, I got my DR650SE. I love it, it's great. Just took it for a ride, first time on a motorcycle actually, lol. Let me know what you guys think.
If you use your smarts as well in learning to ride safely, as you did in avoiding the generic KLR purchase, you'll do fine.

It's still a big handful of a bike to learn on, just be careful out there and take your time getting used to riding defensively always.

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Old 07-20-2013, 08:06 AM   #78917
YnotJP?
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Mambo Dave, I am 5'10" I have the Procycle lower pegs. I do long road rides, the solid mounts don't bother me. I like the fact that the Procycle ones don't give up any ground clearance. They are a bit costly, but, I am happy I have them. I have a titanium knee and the angle works better for me.
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Old 07-20-2013, 08:34 AM   #78918
Mambo Dave
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Thanks for the replies on the lowered footpegs guys.
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Old 07-20-2013, 08:49 AM   #78919
RideAlongAtlas1
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mambo Dave View Post
Thanks for the replies on the lowered footpegs guys.
I bought the SW tech lowered pegs of procycle. I haven't installed them yet. But I can say that they are a lot wider and would be a lot stronger than the standard pegs. I'd want to adjust the brake & clutch levers, and make them lower, of course; something I'm not looking forward to doing. The SW Tech Lowered footpegs are are about 1 and half (or slightly more) inches lower than the standard pegs and although I haven't had the need to install them yet, I can tell they'd make a difference and be more comfortable. I've been reluctant to do it 'cause I need more off-road experience and am worried my toes might stick out the bottom too much over rocks.
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Old 07-20-2013, 09:14 AM   #78920
YnotJP?
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RideAlongAtlas1, I think that with the wider pegs, and solid mount, you will find that your footing is more secure. You should get them on.
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Old 07-20-2013, 09:40 AM   #78921
1989THEARK
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collecting information still on the fence of

How much would it cost to re valve if im not happy with the setup i recieve.

as for dampening. Does the shock dampen well enough for a person thats
240lb no gear 270lb with gear and a 115 lb passenger.

Mostly ride alone but when she's on i want her to be comfortable.
When she's off i ride like a bat out of hell as aggressively as my skills will allow both street and off road.

Quote:
Originally Posted by NC Rick View Post
Our Mojave shock is an all new full replacement shock and as Procycle said, since the reservoir is built into the main shock body, it isn't practical to include an external compression adjustment. Please note that the compression adjuster on the OEM shock has VERY, VERY limited effect on the stock OEM shock. The Rebound damping adjuster on the Mojave is a red anodized CNC'd thumb knob that gives the rider a very meaningful range of damper adjustment allowing him or her to match spring rates, loads and riding preferences. The type of adjuster included on the Mojave is a costly and parts intensive mechanical system that is standard equipment on high end shocks. The cost of implementation is why the OEM shock is lacking the facility. The internal valve stack is optomised for the bike as well as the shocks design. As pointed out, The Cogent Dynamics Mojave its a fully serviceable and revalvable shock.
I hope this answers the question. We think the high quality Mojave replacement shock for the DR with be a perfect match for many riders.

Rick
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Old 07-20-2013, 01:42 PM   #78922
SkunkWizard
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Location: "the Planet"
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mambo Dave View Post
Thanks for the replies on the lowered footpegs guys.
Dave-
lowered pegs are a no brainer. I noticed a huge difference in leg crap/stiffness/fatigue on the long way
I too have more TI in my body and soon to get more.

I have a saying "If you don't limp a little, you probably didn't do it right"

I cut the stock pegs and welded them. later I added a half horseshoe cleat that I notched out of cold roll
you should be able to find a tig welder near by if you want to go this route. cutting & welding took me about 1-1/2 hrs. installed.

1st. version


w/cleat




the mounting bolts can run all the way thru the frame if you chase the threads with a tap. I also added a cleat to the brake lever
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Old 07-20-2013, 01:54 PM   #78923
acesandeights
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Location: So. Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1989THEARK View Post
How much would it cost to re valve if im not happy with the setup i recieve.

as for dampening. Does the shock dampen well enough for a person thats
240lb no gear 270lb with gear and a 115 lb passenger.

Mostly ride alone but when she's on i want her to be comfortable.
When she's off i ride like a bat out of hell as aggressively as my skills will allow both street and off road.
EVERYTHING is a trade off. You cannot have something set up for a 250 rider and 400 lbs of riders that works equally well for both. However, if you get something that works for an aggressive rider it may translate a little better to 2-up and less aggressive. I wouldn't worry as much about the damping as the spring rate. I would buy one that works for you and your riding style and one that is slightly heavier (maybe 10 - 15%) for when you ride 2-up. It's not that hard to change just the spring.
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Old 07-20-2013, 01:54 PM   #78924
DockingPilot
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tlmaffucci View Post
I like that jacket you've got there, where did you get it from?
Rev It Sand. Vents really well.
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Old 07-20-2013, 02:58 PM   #78925
Ever Onward
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"High security saturday " is done, finally "beer thirty" !

It started at 5 AM. I did everything behind the clutch cover side. All went well, until the time to get the top NSU screw out with the clutch still on. Couldnt get a good angle with my "L" screwdriver.

Also didnt like holding a stubby driver bit with needle nose vice grips. Decided to pull the whole clutch off and do it right.

Well, of course my old clutch hub holder tool didnt fit, so had to get creative with a long punch, small crescent wrench, and a couple long bolts and fender washers. The bolts pretty much bottomed out in the post bosses for strength so not to break either of the bosses used.








Worked fine, also used it to hold clutch hub for retorque. Hub nut was nice and tight to start with.

Next was the NSU. Replaced screws with locktighted allens that had lockwashers underneath.

Drilled the allens for safety wire just for good old school racers sake !

In the end I have.....Locktight, Lock washers, AND stainless safety wire !!!


I feel fairly confident there will be no issues involving the NSU !







I also locktighted the 2 screws that hold the metal splashplate on behind the clutch. Reinstalled all the clutch stuff and then folded up a shop rag and rotated it into the primary gears to lock the crank nut.

(Huge thanks to Bergdonk !!) That is the slickest way to hold the primary crank gear for nut removal and installation. No harm what so ever to the gears.

Removed nut and cleaned everything up with brake cleaner, then blue locktight on the nut and retorqued it.

My NSU screws were real tight to start with at 4k. The clutch hub was tight also.

BUT ............ The primary drive crank nut had maybe 20 pounds torque to start with ! Obviously only about 1/4 what it should have been.

Torqued it up to 72 pounds on assembly.

So be warned, even low mile, gently ridden bikes may have things gettin loose under the cover.

When I looked at the 2 screws holding the splashplate, they could possibly do the same damage the NSU screws do when they fall out.

Might be worth pulling the clutch and locktight those also for those of us paranoid preventive kinda mechanics !
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Old 07-20-2013, 03:17 PM   #78926
bradrh
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Joined: Sep 2011
Location: lakewood, co
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Quote:
Originally Posted by malignity View Post
Hey everyone,

I'm looking at possibly getting a 2000 DR650. Its got about 22,000 miles on it. How many more miles on average will I be able to get before I'm looking at a rebuild?

With proper suspension, will a DR650 be able to achieve freeway speed with a 240lb driver and 170lb passenger?

I want a backup/guest 'dirt bike', but also would like to kill two birds with one stone and have an adventure bike for my wife and I. The XR650L is too tall for a passenger, and the KLR is too heavy to be used as a dirt bike.

I'm hoping the DR650 will fit.
It depends how long your legs are. My wife & I are 5-10 & we're too cramped to ride 2 up for very long.
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Old 07-20-2013, 03:18 PM   #78927
bross
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Joined: Nov 2005
Location: Osoyoos, BC
Oddometer: 4,412
Quote:
Originally Posted by Low Budget View Post
"High security saturday " is done, finally "beer thirty" !

It started at 5 AM. I did everything behind the clutch cover side. All went well, until the time to get the top NSU screw out with the clutch still on. Couldnt get a good angle with my "L" screwdriver.

Also didnt like holding a stubby driver bit with needle nose vice grips. Decided to pull the whole clutch off and do it right.

Well, of course my old clutch hub holder tool didnt fit, so had to get creative with a long punch, small crescent wrench, and a couple long bolts and fender washers. The bolts pretty much bottomed out in the post bosses for strength so not to break either of the bosses used.





Worked fine, also used it to hold clutch hub for retorque. Hub nut was nice and tight to start with.

Next was the NSU. Replaced screws with locktighted allens that had lockwashers underneath.

Drilled the allens for safety wire just for good old school racers sake !

In the end I have.....Locktight, Lock washers, AND stainless safety wire !!!


I feel fairly confident there will be no issues involving the NSU !

I also locktighted the 2 screws that hold the metal splashplate on behind the clutch. Reinstalled all the clutch stuff and then folded up a shop rag and rotated it into the primary gears to lock the crank nut.

(Huge thanks to Bergdonk !!) That is the slickest way to hold the primary crank gear for nut removal and installation. No harm what so ever to the gears.

Removed nut and cleaned everything up with brake cleaner, then blue locktight on the nut and retorqued it.

My NSU screws were real tight to start with at 4k. The clutch hub was tight also.

BUT ............ The primary drive crank nut had maybe 20 pounds torque to start with ! Obviously only about 1/4 what it should have been.

Torqued it up to 72 pounds on assembly.

So be warned, even low mile, gently ridden bikes may have things gettin loose under the cover.

When I looked at the 2 screws holding the splashplate, they could possibly do the same damage the NSU screws do when they fall out.

Might be worth pulling the clutch and locktight those also for those of us paranoid preventive kinda mechanics !
You did take that paper towel out of the hole before putting the cover back on, right?
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Old 07-20-2013, 03:35 PM   #78928
Ever Onward
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Actually its white T'shirt pieces. I started beer thirty AFTER all was done.

Not one of those days to be beered up while inside the internals of the engine.

Even remembered to put oil in.
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Old 07-20-2013, 04:26 PM   #78929
Mambo Dave
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Location: Pompano Beach, FL
Oddometer: 4,720
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkunkWizard View Post
I cut the stock pegs and welded them. later I added a half horseshoe cleat that I notched out of cold roll
you should be able to find a tig welder near by if you want to go this route. cutting & welding took me about 1-1/2 hrs. installed.
...
the mounting bolts can run all the way thru the frame if you chase the threads with a tap. I also added a cleat to the brake lever
What did you use to notch the cold roll so uniformly?

I have a mig welder (110 volt, but it should do the job) here at the house, so while I love Tig welds... on steel I should should be able to get 'er done without the prettiness.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Low Budget View Post




I love that use of a crescent wrench. I'm going to have to remember that since most crescent wrenches have the hole at the end.

Believe it or not, I found a way to use a tool I became an expert with back when I did demolition for a living... a long flat pry bar:



I found that the 'hooked' end could be inserted to catch on a reinforcing tab and ... I think the other end of it on one of the raised threaded holes.

...

Hey, it was all I could come up with at the time.
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"After reading through this thread I've come to the conclusion
that more people cruise the internet looking for reasons why
X bike won't work in Y scenario rather than actually riding
their motorcycles
." --
RyanR

Mambo Dave screwed with this post 07-20-2013 at 04:31 PM
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Old 07-20-2013, 07:28 PM   #78930
Kommando
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Joined: Nov 2006
Location: Spacecoaster FL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mambo Dave View Post
Coudl someone here extoll the virtues, if any, for a 5'10" rider and lowered footpegs? What did you notice?

I've ridden my DR on one trip so far, and during that trip I didn't really ever think 'Hey, these footpegs need lowered!", nor did I get the leg cramps that some of my other bikes had given me.

I could see widening the footpegs, instead, for more comfort (I'm on a budget here, yet that seems to make more sense to me out of the two alterations).

Then there's the whole losing of the rubber-damped footpeg mounts for most kits if I were to do it. Not sure that's a great idea either...

What I'm trying to make is a bike I could do a 700 or more mile day if I wanted to (yet, yes, out of a dual sport).
Toughen up your butt and just relax.



Seriously, though...A lot of it is in your mindset. I did over 1100 miles in a day on my DR when it was darn-near stock. The stock seat didn't even really put me off much. I'm 5'8"/30" inseam, BTW.

You can remove the rubber inserts from the peg brackets and then cut/weld the brackets before putting the rubber back in. I recommend wider pegs too. I also moved mine rearwards a little bit. It's a bit more roomy for long rides, but the biggest space improvement was clearance for my offroad boots by the shifter. With the lowered pegs and rearward shift, moving from seated to standing and back is easier. I also consider installing a lower seat now and then.

I like having the Happy Trails touring pegs on my skid too, but they could be sturdier, and I don't use them for very long usually. Much like also lowering my passenger pegs 2", the main benefit is just being able to move my feet around occasionally. I still ride most of the miles on the rider pegs.

The important attributes I have for doing big mileage in a day on the DR are:

- Big tank. Stopping for gas every 150 miles kills time. I have an IMS that holds over 5.3gal, but I'm shopping for a good deal on a used Safari tank.
- Multiple foot positions. This allows you to stretch out or scrunch up. It allows you to change the angle of your seating and your upper body.
- Comfy seat.
- Gear that keeps you comfortable.
- Throttle lock and/or CrampBuster on comfy grips, with handguards over them.
- Good lights, 360 degrees. Ride early to late, but stay alert.
- Power and gearing to easily cruise with traffic and to pass trucks. Tuning the carbing to get decent MPG helps too.
- A quiet exhaust that isn't "barky".
- Tires and suspension that do not cause me stress on the slab.
- Radio/MP3.
- Staying hydrated, well-rested, and moderately-fed on healthy stuff.
- Keeping the attitude of adventure.

I don't have a windscreen, but a lot of DR owners like them.
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Kommando screwed with this post 07-21-2013 at 09:05 AM
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