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Old 07-22-2013, 07:28 AM   #78976
Schall87
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Location: Brandon, Mississippi
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Lower Bearing Chain Roller

Ok, I replaced the lower chain roller on my 1994 DR650 with the 34mm
sealed bearing type. It is much smoother, quieter etc.. (Before, with
the OEM roller, I could feel a harsh rattle through the shift lever on
downshifts.)

BUT my chain does not fully line up with the roller itself. I can't
really explain, so I drew a quick picture- Only the outer half of the
chain is rolling on the roller- instead of both sides of the links.. Is this Bad, or Dangerous? If so, How can I correct this?

Here is the pic-
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Old 07-22-2013, 07:40 AM   #78977
MrBob
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Location: Boulderish, CO
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FatChance View Post
When Fatwife and I take long trips on our motorcycles, we say that we like to take our bikes on our vacations instead of taking our vacations on the bikes. On our two week ride up to Montana in three weeks, we will average under 250 miles a day with two off days to enjoy a couple favorite places. Living where we do, we are on vacation when we leave the driveway and don't want to or have to ride freeways. That has worked for us for the last 20 years of doing multiweek trips through the Rockies every summer.
As an impetuous youth, I once rode a 750 mile day on my Norton. These days, I'm likely to ride between 100 and 500 miles in a day and change the route twice before breakfast, now that I'm in a state of retired geezerdom.
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Old 07-22-2013, 07:46 AM   #78978
MrBob
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Schall87 View Post
Ok, I replaced the lower chain roller on my 1994 DR650 with the 34mm
sealed bearing type. It is much smoother, quieter etc.. (Before, with
the OEM roller, I could feel a harsh rattle through the shift lever on
downshifts.)

BUT my chain does not fully line up with the roller itself. I can't
really explain, so I drew a quick picture- Only the outer half of the
chain is rolling on the roller- instead of both sides of the links.. Is this Bad, or Dangerous? If so, How can I correct this?

Here is the pic-
I'd like to see the solution to this one before ordering one.
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Old 07-22-2013, 07:46 AM   #78979
Rumlover
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Location: Utah
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Schall87 View Post
Ok, I replaced the lower chain roller on my 1994 DR650 with the 34mm
sealed bearing type. It is much smoother, quieter etc.. (Before, with
the OEM roller, I could feel a harsh rattle through the shift lever on
downshifts.)

BUT my chain does not fully line up with the roller itself. I can't
really explain, so I drew a quick picture- Only the outer half of the
chain is rolling on the roller- instead of both sides of the links.. Is this Bad, or Dangerous? If so, How can I correct this?

Here is the pic-
Check rear sprocket alignment. Also keep in mind many have reported the alignment marks for the rear wheel may not be correct. An alignment tool or, if you're cheap, a good straight edge (length of angle stock, etc.) can be used.
Good luck!

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Old 07-22-2013, 07:55 AM   #78980
DockingPilot
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Old 07-22-2013, 08:23 AM   #78981
Rumlover
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Schall87 View Post
Ok, I replaced the lower chain roller on my 1994 DR650 with the 34mm

Just realized you have a 94 DR. You may want to check on their thread for more specific info that may apply. Just a thought -- was the old roller longer then the new one?

Good luck!
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Old 07-22-2013, 08:46 AM   #78982
dman
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Joined: Sep 2004
Location: Santa Cruz, CA
Oddometer: 565
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mambo Dave View Post
Coudl someone here extoll the virtues, if any, for a 5'10" rider and lowered footpegs? What did you notice?
I am a little taller with maybe 32" nominal inseam, and I noticed a HUGE difference with ProCycle lowered pegs. Easier to stand and better position relative to stock riser - less reach to the bars when standing, less pain in my tired old knees, and greatly improved seat comfort. I have done 400 mile+ days with the stock seat and it's OK to the point where a new seat is now very low on my list. I presume this is because with the lower pegs there's less weight on the butt and more weight distributed through the thighs into the seat. Peg vibration is increased, but not uncomfortable; however it seems more variable with rpm and throttle opening than before, so I still have to get used to it and stop worrying that something is wrong.

I liked them so much I just installed peg lowering brackets on my DL650; the knee pain is hugely helped but butt/seat interface if anything feels a tad worse. YMMV.

-dman

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Old 07-22-2013, 08:55 AM   #78983
dman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by P-P View Post
I'd rather not have either - gotta love Nevada!
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Old 07-22-2013, 08:58 AM   #78984
bonnyc
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How difficult do carbs make DR650 ownership

I am
1. a beginner rider (don't have a bike yet, am considering a DR650 for my first bike)
2. not mechanically adept or inclined and
3. I live in NYC, where there is a good chance the bike is going to be in storage for 6-8 months, and maybe ridden only on weekends during summer months.

How hard will it be to own a new or close to new, completely stock DR650? Will the carbs need much fiddling and work?

How much time should I expect to spend per week on maintenance, and how hard will it be to pick the skills up?

bonnyc screwed with this post 07-22-2013 at 08:58 AM Reason: terrible typo
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Old 07-22-2013, 09:05 AM   #78985
dman
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Location: Santa Cruz, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Low Budget View Post
Well, of course my old clutch hub holder tool didnt fit, so had to get creative with a long punch, small crescent wrench, and a couple long bolts and fender washers. The bolts pretty much bottomed out in the post bosses for strength so not to break either of the bosses used.


Based on my recent experience doing the NSU, also finding I couldn't really reach the screws under the clutch, and using the hub bosses and a similar setup to loosen/tighten the hub nut, I would NOT recommend this technique. I too used long bolts that had full thread engagement into the bosses, and the boss merely broke at the base. I'd really suggest buying or making a clutch tool that engages the splines. I ended up using one to install my NEW hub and it was a piece of cake.

-dman
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Old 07-22-2013, 09:11 AM   #78986
barko1
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Joined: Nov 2004
Location: Las Cruces, NM or thereabouts
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bonnyc View Post
I am
1. a beginner rider (don't have a bike yet, am considering a DR650 for my first bike)
2. not mechanically adept or inclined and
3. I live in NYC, where there is a good chance the bike is going to be in storage for 6-8 months, and maybe ridden only on weekends during summer months.

How hard will it be to own a new or close to new, completely stock DR650? Will the carbs need much fiddling and work?

How much time should I expect to spend per week on maintenance, and how hard will it be to pick the skills up?

Find someone inclined . But really if you get a newer/low mileage DR it should be easy but with the storage and crappy gas you'll have to get some fuel stabilizer for those periods of non use. Here in the great American Southwest I drain my carb and tank if I'm not going to use the bike (rare!) but given your location and humidity I would guess that leaving the tank full with stabilizer is the better option. Run the carbs empty or drain them, not a big deal. The fuel will go bad, without stabilizer, whether the bike is injected or carbed. I'm sure others will chime in.
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Old 07-22-2013, 09:50 AM   #78987
Adv Grifter
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Location: Passing ADV Stalkers in California
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bonnyc View Post
I am
1. a beginner rider (don't have a bike yet, am considering a DR650 for my first bike)
2. not mechanically adept or inclined and
3. I live in NYC, where there is a good chance the bike is going to be in storage for 6-8 months, and maybe ridden only on weekends during summer months.

How hard will it be to own a new or close to new, completely stock DR650? Will the carbs need much fiddling and work?

How much time should I expect to spend per week on maintenance, and how hard will it be to pick the skills up?
Quote:
Originally Posted by barko1 View Post
Find someone inclined . But really if you get a newer/low mileage DR it should be easy but with the storage and crappy gas you'll have to get some fuel stabilizer for those periods of non use. Here in the great American Southwest I drain my carb and tank if I'm not going to use the bike (rare!) but given your location and humidity I would guess that leaving the tank full with stabilizer is the better option. Run the carbs empty or drain them, not a big deal. The fuel will go bad, without stabilizer, whether the bike is injected or carbed. I'm sure others will chime in.
True, Fuel injected bikes can be even MORE problematic if let to sit too long without fuel stabilizer. But with stabilizer in the fuel, all should be OK on the DR650.

Ideally, even in Winter, try to start up the bike once a month or so, Run it for 15 minutes. Store it Full of fuel, and add Marvel Mystery Oil to the fuel as well as Stabil (fuel stabilizer). Also, buy a Battery Tender and keep your bike plugged in ALL WINTER. Simple.

As a new rider ... first priority would be to enroll in an MSF rider course. (Motorcycle Safety Foundation) You'll learn a lot, it will really help develop good riding habits early on. A "must do", IMO.

The DR650 is really nearly maintenance free. Oil and clean the chain once in a while and replace tires when worn out. Over time you may want to make a few upgrades to the bike ... but for your first year ... just ride and enjoy and concentrate on your riding and getting BETTER on the bike.
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Old 07-22-2013, 10:24 AM   #78988
barko1
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Location: Las Cruces, NM or thereabouts
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Adv Grifter View Post
Also, buy a Battery Tender and keep your bike plugged in ALL WINTER. Simple.

And if you don't have an electrical connection where there bike will spend the winter pull the battery and bring it home with you and keep it on the tender.
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Old 07-22-2013, 11:08 AM   #78989
FatChance
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Location: Durango, Colorado, USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sandwash View Post
Isn't Durango home of million dollar highway?
After inflation it is now the 1.26 Billion Dollar Highway.

Technically, the Million Dollar Highway is US550 between Silverton and Ouray, Colorado.
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Old 07-22-2013, 11:28 AM   #78990
bosley1980
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Location: Middle Europe
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mambo Dave View Post
Thanks for the replies on the lowered footpegs guys.
Hello Dave maybe can help you?

Look at this thread
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=879707
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