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Old 07-23-2013, 05:16 AM   #78976
Emmbeedee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bonnyc View Post
How hard will it be to own a new or close to new, completely stock DR650? Will the carbs need much fiddling and work?
My DR had been "fiddled" with when I bought it and it ran like a piece of crap, fouling plugs and smelling of unburned gas. I made it run much better now but I can't get more than about 350 kms on a full IMS tank. My wife's bike was bought completely stock, unmolested. Her bike starts much faster than mine and never misses a beat. She can go 450 kms on the same size of fuel tank.

So based on that, the next DR I buy will probably not have its carb played with. So if I was you, I wouldn't worry about anything more than putting fuel conditioner in it when you store it.
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Old 07-23-2013, 06:04 AM   #78977
thump!
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Emmbeedee View Post
My DR had been "fiddled" with when I bought it and it ran like a piece of crap, fouling plugs and smelling of unburned gas. I made it run much better now but I can't get more than about 350 kms on a full IMS tank. My wife's bike was bought completely stock, unmolested. Her bike starts much faster than mine and never misses a beat. She can go 450 kms on the same size of fuel tank.

So based on that, the next DR I buy will probably not have its carb played with. So if I was you, I wouldn't worry about anything more than putting fuel conditioner in it when you store it.
In my experience the needle has a rather dramatic effect on fuel consumption during what I consider "normal" use. However, your normal may not be my normal. I've had two DR650s at the same time also. One of them had a dynojet kit installed. I did a bit of carb component swapping with those bikes and concluded that while the idle mixture screw and pilot jet have a significant effect on throttle response and hence rideability they don't really impact fuel consumption very much. Likewise the main jet has a big effect on performance AND fuel consumption when riding very aggressively but during part or light throttle riding (i.e. my normal) it doesn't have a big effect on fuel use. However, relatively minor changes to the needle shape and height does have a big effect. For instance, on my bike with no snorkel, a 140 main jet, a fresh needle jet and the oem needle, going from a .030" shim to .060" shim drops the fuel mileage around 4 or 5 miles per US gallon (from high 50's to low 50's). It does run nicely with the .060" shim tho! A worn needle or needle jet would probably have the same effect.
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Old 07-23-2013, 06:11 AM   #78978
Carl Childers
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Location: Northern New Mexico
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kommando View Post
The DR only has one carb, and it's a simple one. Mine has a Procycle jetting kit and I hardly ever mess with it since initial install, unless I'm changing mufflers. The DR is pretty simple too. Get yourself a decent service manual...book form is usually easiest for me to use. The factory toolkit actually works, but you're likely to want tools that are more comfortable to your hands. You may also want a torque-wrench. See Harbor Freight's website and read reviews before buying. Do the MSF pre-ride inspection...T-CLOCS. Be careful not to over-torque fasteners, especially ones that thread into aluminum. Ask an experienced local guy to show you how to follow the manual. Loc-Tite and anti-seize are your friends. Consult us beforehand if you need any help. Lots of DR owners here are a wealth of info, and they can save you from breaking your bike. Keep the chain lubed/adjusted, tires properly inflated, fasteners properly torqued, and google the common DR650 "fixes".

Put the battery on a tender if it's parked long, as mentioned. I use SeaFoam in my fuel, and it cleans/stabilizes the whole fuel system. Put the bike on a stand, to get it off the tires. Put decent tires on the bike and ride it all year.

Definitely take a Beginner Rider Course (BRC). With a dualsport, you can practice on dirt AND large empty parking lots before attempting traffic.

Check out the DR650 section of www.procycle.us for DR parts/upgrades. wwww.kientech.com also sell DR items. I also shop classifieds for used parts...here, DRRiders.com, Ebay, craigslist, etc. The websites for Motorcycle Superstore, Bike Bandit, Iron Pony, Cycle Gear, and many others are good for new tires, apparel, and other items.
Kommando covered all the bases.......good advice all. I'll just repeat take the MSF course and practice all you learn from it. A big part of this sport is learning to ride defensively and doing continuing ed. on that subject on your own beyond the basic MSF course.

A DR is a pretty good bike to start riding with, you won't out grow it and it can be modified and morphed into a whole different bike as your skills improve.
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Old 07-23-2013, 08:11 AM   #78979
Mambo Dave
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thump! View Post
In my experience the needle has a rather dramatic effect on fuel consumption during what I consider "normal" use. However, your normal may not be my normal. I've had two DR650s at the same time also. One of them had a dynojet kit installed. I did a bit of carb component swapping with those bikes and concluded that while the idle mixture screw and pilot jet have a significant effect on throttle response and hence rideability they don't really impact fuel consumption very much. Likewise the main jet has a big effect on performance AND fuel consumption when riding very aggressively but during part or light throttle riding (i.e. my normal) it doesn't have a big effect on fuel use. However, relatively minor changes to the needle shape and height does have a big effect. For instance, on my bike with no snorkel, a 140 main jet, a fresh needle jet and the oem needle, going from a .030" shim to .060" shim drops the fuel mileage around 4 or 5 miles per US gallon (from high 50's to low 50's). It does run nicely with the .060" shim tho! A worn needle or needle jet would probably have the same effect.

Interesting observation. But if it runs nicely (no plug fouling, not rich, etc.) then isn't that how the bike should be jetted, and anything less is running it 'lean'?

I understand that there is some leeway in the acceptable range of lean-ness since so many bikes come jetted lean these days. I'm at sea level, so I ran the largest jet the Pro-Cycle kit offered (can't rememer if it was a 150 or 155) just to be safe (for the opened airbox and speeds I push the bike to, often near-maximum in fifth gear on highway I-95 if that's the speed traffic needs me to go to prevent getting run over).

Maybe I'm just missing what a conservative needle will do for a bike though (since you did differentiate the difference in fuel economy it can give vs. changing the maion jet). As long as my bike won't run starved for fuel, I'll try anything.
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Old 07-23-2013, 08:48 AM   #78980
brucifer
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My chain broke on the way home from work last night. Just a little over 2000 miles.....
Had the adjustment fairly loose and it was lubed. I can't remember the last time I had a chain break on one of my bikes. Probably back in the '70s when I was a kid and wasn't familiar with the word "maintenance".
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Old 07-23-2013, 09:58 AM   #78981
maynard911
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brucifer View Post
My chain broke on the way home from work last night. Just a little over 2000 miles.....
Had the adjustment fairly loose and it was lubed. I can't remember the last time I had a chain break on one of my bikes. Probably back in the '70s when I was a kid and wasn't familiar with the word "maintenance".
Could you give us some more info,
original chain or replacement
brand and type
did it actually break or did the master link come apart
if the master link, was it rivet or clip type
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Old 07-23-2013, 11:56 AM   #78982
8gv
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brucifer View Post
My chain broke on the way home from work last night. Just a little over 2000 miles.....
Had the adjustment fairly loose and it was lubed. I can't remember the last time I had a chain break on one of my bikes. Probably back in the '70s when I was a kid and wasn't familiar with the word "maintenance".
Any case damage?
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Old 07-23-2013, 11:58 AM   #78983
Adv Grifter
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Location: Passing ADV Stalkers in California
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Quote:
Originally Posted by refokus View Post

BergDonk, help me out here.............please..............or anyone else that has a good solution. I have seen the brackets where they drop the peg and also set it back an inch, but I don't want nothing lower then what the frame/skip plate is.

I have not had my DR for too long but I have taken it on two rides that knocked the new off of the suspension. But, the peg position on this bike sucks. I was in the middle of a nasty climb yesterday and the position and the flex of the pegs was pretty bad. I have been trying to figure out a way to fix this problem. Lower and back.............
I would take some measurements mounted up on your KTM 450 ... assuming you like that riding position? With some adjustments you may get the DR headed in that direction.

Using something like Rox Risers may allow better bar position and give something closer to the KTM? The DR rider pegs are too far forward for sure ... maybe a well engineered mod moving them back an inch or so? Next, a narrow Moto style seat? All that done may help you feel more comfortable ... but still won't make your DR a KTM 450 off road!
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Old 07-23-2013, 12:04 PM   #78984
Adv Grifter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tlmaffucci View Post
Yeah, thanks. My thoughts were that if it had this much wear, it must be doing something it's supposed too. Guess not. What IS an upper chain roller supposed to do?
Quote:
Originally Posted by ER70S-2 View Post
The answer to that question may go on for several pages. It couldn't be too important, mine has been out for 40k + miles.
Oh, and welcome to the site.
Ideally the rollers keep the chain from de-railing off the sprockets when suspension is compressed to Max riding off road. I've never heard of a DR throwing the chain due to de-railment for lack of Chain Rolllers. (I took both of mine off ... they are noisy) Some say the rollers also protect the chain from eating into the Alu Swing arm. If doing LOTS of really aggressive off road, check your swing arm's rubber damping strip from time to time for wear.
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Old 07-23-2013, 12:06 PM   #78985
schmittie120
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What do you guys think of this bike:

http://bakersfield.craigslist.org/mcy/3949298360.html

I am looking for a commuter/weekend canyon/explorer bike and I am between this and a SV650. My only concern with this bike is the hi compression piston and its effects on reliability. Are these concerns warranted?

Thanks for the help
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Old 07-23-2013, 12:24 PM   #78986
refokus
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Location: North Phoenix
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Adv Grifter View Post
I would take some measurements mounted up on your KTM 450 ... assuming you like that riding position? With some adjustments you may get the DR headed in that direction.

Using something like Rox Risers may allow better bar position and give something closer to the KTM? The DR rider pegs are too far forward for sure ... maybe a well engineered mod moving them back an inch or so? Next, a narrow Moto style seat? All that done may help you feel more comfortable ... but still won't make your DR a KTM 450 off road!
It would be nice to have the riding position of the 450, but that's not going to happen on this bike. I did add some 1" risers that I ordered from Pro Cycle and I have some high bend bars. The riding position of the bars are pretty much perfect. It's when I am standing and the forward position of the pegs is what's throwing off my entire riding position. If I could get them back an inch+ this would be ideal. I am not too fond of the rubber bushings in the pegs as they just flex a lot, but I could live with it.

I saw somewhere on this thread where somone cut and re-welded the stem on the pegs to push them back and down, but I just can't find it anywhere. And I actually did look for like an hour. Thanks for the advice Grifter, I will keep searching around.
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Old 07-23-2013, 12:26 PM   #78987
refokus
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Quote:
Originally Posted by schmittie120 View Post
What do you guys think of this bike:

http://bakersfield.craigslist.org/mcy/3949298360.html

I am looking for a commuter/weekend canyon/explorer bike and I am between this and a SV650. My only concern with this bike is the hi compression piston and its effects on reliability. Are these concerns warranted?

Thanks for the help
Looks great..............buy it and give us a report on how it is.
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Old 07-23-2013, 12:28 PM   #78988
Adv Grifter
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Location: Passing ADV Stalkers in California
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thump! View Post
In my experience the needle has a rather dramatic effect on fuel consumption during what I consider "normal" use. However, your normal may not be my normal. I've had two DR650s at the same time also. One of them had a dynojet kit installed. I did a bit of carb component swapping with those bikes and concluded that while the idle mixture screw and pilot jet have a significant effect on throttle response and hence rideability they don't really impact fuel consumption very much. Likewise the main jet has a big effect on performance AND fuel consumption when riding very aggressively but during part or light throttle riding (i.e. my normal) it doesn't have a big effect on fuel use. However, relatively minor changes to the needle shape and height does have a big effect. For instance, on my bike with no snorkel, a 140 main jet, a fresh needle jet and the oem needle, going from a .030" shim to .060" shim drops the fuel mileage around 4 or 5 miles per US gallon (from high 50's to low 50's). It does run nicely with the .060" shim tho! A worn needle or needle jet would probably have the same effect.
We need Derek (Motolab) to do another tutorial on needles. I got my own tutorial a few years ago when I first got my DR650. Marc Salvisburg, owner of Factory Pro, is my neighbor and his shop is 2 minutes from my house.

Marc said the stock BST40 Mikuni non-adjustable needle is a "classic" EPA needle: engineered to pass emissions testing.

According to Marc, the DR650 will actually run HOTTER at small throttle openings and at cruise speeds (one quarter to half throttle) AND ... will run RICH (and waste fuel) at 3/4 to Full throttle openings.

During mild highway cruising with stock needle the motor can run a bit HOT. (in fact, not really a problem on the DR due to stellar SACS oil/air cooling system.

There are a variety of Needles that Derek recommends. One is the OEM adjustable NON USA needle available in Australia. KTM needles work also and one or two others too. Needle clip adjustment allows for more precise tuning and can eliminate surging some have with OEM needle, and can have a significant effect on fuel economy.

The proper needle taper really sweetens up the way the DR650 runs ... and if everything else is set up correctly to match, then starting, cruising and full throttle response should all be good ... AND good fuel economy too.
I never got decent MPG trying shim the stock needle without compromising over all performance and throttle response.
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Old 07-23-2013, 12:35 PM   #78989
The_Precious_Juice
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Oddometer: 2,090
Lowered suspension. Yes or NO.

Greetings.

164lbs
5'-8"
Great health.

I've been debaiting over what would be a great transport for 8 month North American Enduro (USA. BC and Yukon and Alaska). the avenue of approach would be on small roads, and highways would be "making time". Maybe on the back half, I'd hit up the TAT.

I'm also interested in having a MC as a primary vehicle afterwards.
I'd like to buy brand new back in VA where the sales tax is low and the cost go down in the winter months.

My personality is toward "ultar light" adventure Riding.
I believe the little dr (DR200se) is the bike for such a tasker.
298lbs and 80+ mpg under great conditions. 31.5" seat. 10.2" ground clearance.


However, it's main fault is no Interstate access (very light, max speed is less than 80), and more maintenence due to a smaller engine, and poor ergos.

When you look at the Mighty DR, it is just an 88lbs up grade for a whole lot of displacement. 445cc to be exact. that means for every lb you get just over 5cc. The HP would more than double.

I'd hate to give up the great gas milage, but having two rot-pax (2 gallons each) straped to each side of the 650 would put me up to 7.4 total gallons. that's a 400 mile range.
I do not want to hurt the warrenty by putting in a gas tank. But, having the extra power would be could on the highways.

__
Now to the topic at hand.
I'm interested in having the suspension lowred during the initial purchase of the 650.

Well, once I'm confident the dealer knows how to. There are actually two steps.

I like the 33.3" seat(8.9" ground clearence) because:
1. With the stock seat (34.8") I'm close to being on the balls of my feet. So half way inbetween this and my tippy toes with the stock 34.8."
I'd prefer more traction and control with my feet. Plus, even this will go away when put a cusion of sorts on the seat.

2. I'm not going to be that aggresive off-road. I should not miss the 1.5."
Meaning, the 2012 DL V-Strom 650 could do 90% of this trek.
but I like the thumpers because I plan on spending most of my time in 4th gear going about 40mph on two lane roads. The 62hp V-twin would be too much.

I know the suspension is very "springy," so would losing the 1.5" be a bad thing for cruising and such?

__
Manning up is not an issue.

1. Why take away ground clearance. It's a dual sport!

2. With 4 extra gallons and my gear, I'd still be less than 415lbs. At least that is my goal. So the bike would be easier to manage at traffic lights and off-roading than most other DS.

3. Light dumps would not hurt her.

4. I'd miss the commanding view when on the road. Because, I'm in command of the caravan, as I hold up traffic in a 50mph speed zone.

But not in Alaska, there is a law for holding up more than 5 cars behind you.


thanks for reading.

The_Precious_Juice screwed with this post 07-23-2013 at 12:46 PM
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Old 07-23-2013, 12:37 PM   #78990
ER70S-2
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Thanks to the work of MxRob.

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