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Old 08-20-2013, 09:37 PM   #80431
Adv Grifter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GSF1200S View Post
Anyways, i really hope some detailed info is put out on the Warp9 stainless filter. Here in the US i have no problem with paper filters, but since im planning a South America trip it would be really nice not to have to hunt down a filter every oil change (or carry enough for my very anal oil change frequency). Ive even contemplated ways to use an extra quart of oil to "flush" the filter after cleaning it (like some kind of PVC pipe setup) to make sure everything gets out of the filter. Of course it would have to be small or I might as well carry a ton of papers.
I certainly would consider Warp 9's stainless filter. One way to do a "performance test", stock paper vs. Stainless would be to have your oil analyzed. Docking Pilot has a good relationship with a reputable company. He posted results here a month or so back.

Filters may not be your only problem once in S. America. Not all oil is created equal. Many locally sourced motor oil lacks the trick additive packages that US and EU products contain.

An example is PEMEX (Mexico). There you'll find major USA brands for sale cheap. But they ALL say "hecho en mexico" on the label ... not imported. (Pennzoil, Quaker State, Castrol, Mobil, Havoline) ALL are Pemex base stocks and have none of the additive packages or refining sophistication these same brands have in the USA. There are just a version of Pemex, which is about 50 years behind in this field. This info comes from my neighbor (and fellow rider) who worked for Chevron for 12 years.

In Mexico and other countries, you CAN find USA or EU produced oil. But it can be expensive (imported) and sometimes hard to find. It will say either Made in USA or Hecho en Estados Unidos ... or some Euro country. This scenario will vary country to country. The fact is ... a brand name oil may not contain the proprietary additives USA oils commonly have, so check the "made in" labels. US and EU companies sell the name ... but not the formula or process. When you get to Mexico and see just how many nearly NEW cars SMOKE like crazy ... you will be a believer. Good oil matters.

Many good bike shops will carry USA and EU imported oils, but no all. But you'll pay for "the good stuff". Also, synthetic is not as common as it is here, but becoming more common as are blends. Just make sure you're sure about where it's made.

Also, there may be some companies that have paid for use of the formula and sell good oil. Many countries have their own national oil industry and sell products locally(Argentina, Brazil, Venezuela and Ecuador to name a few) I have no idea about the quality of that oil ... I only have recent experience in Mexico.

So keep you ear to the ground and learn what you can about oil in various countries. Lots of guys just put in "whatever". In some cases that may work out ... or not!
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Old 08-20-2013, 09:46 PM   #80432
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Originally Posted by motolab View Post

... however there is no hardening process I know of besides forging (if the forging is not bar shaped)...

Regards,

Derek

I didn't know that forging was a form of hardening?
Aww, never mind, it's just semantics.

Regardless

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Old 08-20-2013, 10:20 PM   #80433
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Originally Posted by P-P View Post
I didn't know that forging was a form of hardening?
Metal often does get harder in the forging process, doesn't it?

Regards,

Derek
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Old 08-21-2013, 12:39 AM   #80434
blackcap
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coal mines arent exactly workshop conditions so keeping lubrication and hydraulic fluids clean was a big part of what we did. dont quote me but the monthly bill for filters was somewhere around the $60 000 mark and we were a relatively small operation. the cause of the gear failures has as many opinions as the best oil to use so best to keep it in that thread. regardless of the cause, oil contaminants only generate more wear and contaminants, so better filtration is only going to help the whole engine. i just like to know what im buying, i dont have the money to be throwing it around on things that im not informed on. if i did id probably be over in a BMW forum

Quote:
Originally Posted by Foot dragger View Post
Coal mines,engine oil filters,I guess they're about the same deal............

It seems like,and I know nothing about gears and why they blow up,that when a DR blows it's 3rd gear into 3 or 4 pieces,that the gear still looks fine except for being in 3 pieces or so. Do you really think oil filtration is an issue with a gear coming apart? It looks like they just blow at random times and are gears that werent hardened right or ? Is there any sort of concensus that the DR gears are slowly coming apart before they blow up?

Either way so few do it I just ride the thing.
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Old 08-21-2013, 12:45 AM   #80435
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the big advantage of forging is that it aligns the grain of the metal (yep, even metal has grain) with the shape of the part including the stress reducing design features. cutting and grinding processes cut straight through the grain (which was formed in shaping process for the billet) which makes for a weaker component. i forget the exact details but thats the basics.

Quote:
Originally Posted by motolab View Post
Metal often does get harder in the forging process, doesn't it?

Regards,

Derek
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Old 08-21-2013, 04:08 AM   #80436
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Originally Posted by zoopdingle View Post
Can someone tell me what the key on the right is for? It came with my 2013 DR650.

I have no idea. My 2013 didn't come with a key like that. Maybe it ended up in you owner pack by accident.
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Old 08-21-2013, 04:52 AM   #80437
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answered

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Originally Posted by TrophyHunter View Post
....and don't forget you can order more valve plates so you can drill out one of those dimples for more initial flow and plush feel. I bought a few sets and experimented with one extra hole of different sizes in each plate. Plush but a little too much brake dive so I went back to stock.

Yes - almost 20 year newer suspension technology is noticeable. I still think back to the desert race start in On Any Sunday....where everyone is going faster than I'll ever go across that terrain - on 4 to 6 inches of travel.
Thanks for answering what I was tempted to do when installing the emulators. Plush and control are a tough combo. I was tempted to drill a dimple to start but refrained realizing I had to know how they behaved stock. Once in I found the emulators still plenty compliant on the small stuff. Did you ever try more oil volume?
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Old 08-21-2013, 05:16 AM   #80438
Rusty Rocket
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Originally Posted by Rocktown View Post
I have no idea. My 2013 didn't come with a key like that. Maybe it ended up in you owner pack by accident.
Check the helmet lock.

it looks like the one-sided key that goes with my 1971 TS 185R. 'cept for the black plastic.
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Old 08-21-2013, 06:14 AM   #80439
zoopdingle
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Originally Posted by Rocktown View Post
I have no idea. My 2013 didn't come with a key like that. Maybe it ended up in you owner pack by accident.
That's what I'm thinking; next time I'm in town I'll stop by the dealership and ask them about it.

Thanks!
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Old 08-21-2013, 07:17 AM   #80440
Foot dragger
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Quote:
Originally Posted by psmcd View Post
Thanks for answering what I was tempted to do when installing the emulators. Plush and control are a tough combo. I was tempted to drill a dimple to start but refrained realizing I had to know how they behaved stock. Once in I found the emulators still plenty compliant on the small stuff. Did you ever try more oil volume?
Race Tech sent some instructions along with my Emulators,I doubt I can find them now unfortunately. I do remember rebound can be controlled by oil weight and compression by adjusting the pre-load. But on a heavy bike that can transfer a lot of weight during braking it can only be so plush up front.
My Emulator'ed forks are good in rocks,dont wallow up and down.
The biggest thing Ive found is running the biggest ft tire I can find and running the air pressure as low as is safe for skipping through rocks.
It makes quite a difference. Ive been running an IRC VE-33 as its a tall tire and works on a lot of different conditions.
Its not DOT but I live dangerously and run it anyway,It lasted 3000 miles which is pretty good.
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Old 08-21-2013, 07:22 AM   #80441
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TrophyHunter View Post
....and don't forget you can order more valve plates so you can drill out one of those dimples for more initial flow and plush feel. I bought a few sets and experimented with one extra hole of different sizes in each plate. Plush but a little too much brake dive so I went back to stock.

Yes - almost 20 year newer suspension technology is noticeable. I still think back to the desert race start in On Any Sunday....where everyone is going faster than I'll ever go across that terrain - on 4 to 6 inches of travel.
Ive got friends who race vintage bikes with 6" travel forks and 4" travel shocks.......I have no desire,I already rode that stuff and I know it hurts.
Ive got a 1976 Montesa 250 and a 68 Greeves Challenger sitting here,but havent ridden either beyond riding around the yard to excersize the dog.
They look great sitting here though.
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Old 08-21-2013, 07:42 AM   #80442
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Originally Posted by psmcd View Post
Did you ever try more oil volume?
I did not. I'm at a happy medium and started feeling like the carb jetting discussions that go on here so I just stopped.

I like the set up as it is and I'm sure I could eek out just a little more plush feeling but frankly I just don't ride that hard to make the tinkering worth it. I do enjoy learning new things which is usually what drives me to wrench my way into new territory.

Foof dragger - I envy your two bikes and started on Hodaka's back in the early 70's so I know what you mean. I just admire the riders ability on what most would consider very limited machines. I go to the CalVMX races to watch a buddy race in the "Marty Tripes" 100 series. Fun stuff - and the place smells like premix...!!

http://www.calvmx.net/

This one's for you, FD. The guy was about 70 and still at it.
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TrophyHunter screwed with this post 08-21-2013 at 07:50 AM
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Old 08-21-2013, 07:46 AM   #80443
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funny

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Originally Posted by Foot dragger View Post
Ive got friends who race vintage bikes with 6" travel forks and 4" travel shocks.......I have no desire,I already rode that stuff and I know it hurts.
Ive got a 1976 Montesa 250 and a 68 Greeves Challenger sitting here,but havent ridden either beyond riding around the yard to excersize the dog.
They look great sitting here though.
I had a buddy that hung his old Husky on the wall - looked great.
My earliest riding buddy, NE Oregon late 60s, had a Montesa 250.
Every once in while I'd have to stop, pick him up from a crash and help him unjam his forks that would stick at bottom of stroke. Must have been bent but we didn't know better at the time.

Then you have modern theory to set up for occasional bottoming of suspension. Back then seems you just set up best you could to keep from bottoming too much.
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Old 08-21-2013, 08:00 AM   #80444
Rusty Rocket
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Originally Posted by TrophyHunter View Post

This one's for you, FD. The guy was about 70 and still at it.
Cool, a Greeves. My dad competed on a Greeves in 1960-62.

We have this event going on just up the road this weekend:


lots of vintage stuff. John Penton usually shows up.
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Old 08-21-2013, 08:18 AM   #80445
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Not DR related, so I'll just post a link, but this kid is competitive on a 28 year old bike CR250.

http://www.gloryhog.com/index.php/vi...l-spring-creek

I guess it goes back to the saying, it's the rider, not the bike.

I'd love to have a 1971 Yamaha JT1 (my first bike) to give my kids an opportunity to see what motorcycles were like when I was a kid. Not that anyone's winning races on a 60cc mini-enduro.
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