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Old 09-16-2012, 10:09 PM   #376
rockymountainoyster
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Harleys, Highways, Gasoline, and Rocket Launchers

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Originally Posted by Joe Mc View Post
YES

Wow I couldn't do that to a Road King.

I am going to submit that link to the Harley Davidson police.
Harley Davidson Police? Even the Police ride BMW's

BTW Joe... there is no gas at Antelope Wells, or North of there at Hachita, or at Separ (truck stop with lotsa energy drinks but no fuel) gotta go West on the 10 to Lordsburg or East to Deming. Columbus noteworthy in that it is the only US town to have been invaded by a foreign Army. (Pancho Villa) Also noteworthy as the Mayor, Police Chief and a couple of town board members were indicted a couple of years ago for smuggling guns into Mexico. I don't know about MX 2 South of the border but the last time I rode NM 9 North of the border and West from El Paso the US National Guard had a rocket launcher posted along the route... the ones like you see film of in the Gulf War... boy did I feel safe
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Old 09-16-2012, 10:20 PM   #377
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Camp Stove

Crashmaster "However, a stove is nice to have, especially for a little something hot to drink or a roadside snack when your in the Andes.

But, like I mentioned, you can easily get by without camping gear unless you really want to camp. But a sleeping bag, bivy sack, and a tarp will come in really handy in the Andes if you find yourself broken down in a remote area.[/QUOTE]

Thanks Crash. I have been wondering about this myself. Great suggestion about the stove. I am planning to take a JetBoil. Very compact and you can make great coffee and soup on it. One of my biggest surprises in SA was that it is hard to get a good cup of coffee outside of the big cities. In the countryside it is all instant... if you jones for good coffee gotta take you own ground beans and brew it up yosef.

rockymountainoyster screwed with this post 09-16-2012 at 10:21 PM Reason: ADDITIONAL INFO attribution of of quote
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Old 09-17-2012, 05:21 AM   #378
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Deming, Nuevo Mexico

If you are headed for Old Mexico you may find yourself in Deming, Nuevo Mexico, USA ("Don't call us Mexicans, we are Spanish", NM, USA) There is a cool and cheap, if funky, old motel, The Butterfield Stage. It was once a stop on the Butterfield Stage Route. It is a fifties era place and hasn't been touched much since. The rooms are huge. A good steak house and a brew pub that had decent brew are both in walking distance for those who, like me, want to get off the bike, get the gear off, clean up and walk around a bit. It is then just a short hop down to Columbus, NM and the border crossing into Mexico at Palomas for points South. I understand that a lot of Gringos go to Palomas for dental work and shopping but I keep hearing from everyone that we should get as far from the border as we can as soon as we can. Anyone else with thoughts on Palomas please chime in. I remember Madera being a nice little town with a decent motel. I did not check out Laguna Babicora or the pueblos of Gomez Farias or Babicora nearby. If you want to drop a couple of hundred USD the hotel on the canyon rim at El Divisadero is nice with great views. I featured it in my touristic film on the Sierra del Pacific RR that was part of the "America's Scenic Rail Journeys" series on PBS.
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Old 09-17-2012, 05:47 PM   #379
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Originally Posted by rockymountainoyster View Post
Harley Davidson Police? Even the Police ride BMW's

BTW Joe... there is no gas at Antelope Wells, or North of there at Hachita, or at Separ (truck stop with lotsa energy drinks but no fuel) gotta go West on the 10 to Lordsburg or East to Deming. Columbus noteworthy in that it is the only US town to have been invaded by a foreign Army. (Pancho Villa) Also noteworthy as the Mayor, Police Chief and a couple of town board members were indicted a couple of years ago for smuggling guns into Mexico. I don't know about MX 2 South of the border but the last time I rode NM 9 North of the border and West from El Paso the US National Guard had a rocket launcher posted along the route... the ones like you see film of in the Gulf War... boy did I feel safe
Thanks RMO. Gas availability being scarce at AW and Hachita I'll probably ride 80 out of Douglas to 9 at Rodeo and on to Columbus/Palomas.
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Old 09-18-2012, 10:53 AM   #380
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Yeah the coffee can be tough to find outside the big cities. In Bolivia and Peru I found my self brewing up hot water with coca leaves, spiked with a little of the 96% alcohol that sells for a dollar a liter and is found everywhere. I would pour that 96% in my beer can stove for fuel, then pour a little into my coca tea. Very efficient. . I found that the coca tea, unspiked of course, gave me a better wake up jolt than coffee.

I spent about $2 on this cooking setup, the major cost of course being the beer. It doenst work that well for actual cooking, but for boiling water, making vegtable soup, etc, its great. It worked well in cold temps at high elevation as well. Really nice to have camping in the altiplano and the Andes.



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Old 09-18-2012, 03:30 PM   #381
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Cooking Solution

Crash Very good. Very creative. How do those coca leaves work out for altitude sickness... I had heard of coca mate but didn't know that you could just steep them. You don't need lime to release the alkaloid's? Do you need to go to a farmacia to get them or are they just available roadside?
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Old 09-18-2012, 04:10 PM   #382
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Thanks for the input, that was kinda what I was thinking. I always have a bivy, sleeping bag and pad just in case. I am trying to ditch the tent and cook stuff. I will make my final call on my ride from Denver to Puerto Vallarta.

Just got back from a great ride thru Grand Canyon, Zion, Alpine Loop and Estes Park. Was great to camp in those spots but leaves too much stuff unlocked on my bike that can be snatched pretty quick


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I camped very little in central America as rooms are cheap and plentiful, but it's sometimes nice to hang a hammock under a palapa at a beach campground. I camped a little in Colombia and a bit in Peru but you could get by easily without camping gear unless you really want to camp as rooms are also cheap and plentiful. However, a stove is nice to have, especially for a little something hot to drink or a roadside snack when your in the Andes.

As far as camping in Colombia and Peru I usually pulled into a small village and asked people if there was a safe place I could put my tent. Also, the guys at military checkpoints in Colombia will usually accommodate you for a place to put your tent.

But, like I mentioned, you can easily get by without camping gear unless you really want to camp. But a sleeping bag, bivy sack, and a tarp will come in really handy in the Andes if you find yourself broken down in a remote area.
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Old 09-18-2012, 06:53 PM   #383
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rockymountainoyster View Post
Crash Very good. Very creative. How do those coca leaves work out for altitude sickness... I had heard of coca mate but didn't know that you could just steep them. You don't need lime to release the alkaloid's? Do you need to go to a farmacia to get them or are they just available roadside?
They somewhat mask the symptoms of altitude sickness but I was very acclimated over 4000 meters by the time I started drinking the tea so cant really say how well it actually works. You don't need the lime to make tea, but the tea has much less of an effect than chewing the leaves with lime. However you don't want to drink a few cups before bed that's for sure. You can buy the leaves at pretty much any roadside tienda or market in souther Peru and all of Bolivia.
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Old 09-19-2012, 05:33 AM   #384
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You don't need the lime to make tea, but the tea has much less of an effect than chewing the leaves with lime.
Add a pinch of ground charcoal to the wad - a tip I scored from a local in Cusco last summer.
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Old 09-22-2012, 05:41 PM   #385
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PV Southto... starting about Dec 1st

I am moving my bike south a couple weeks at a time now.

Starting Nov 27 I have 3-4 months off and I am heading South to...IDK!!! Peru and Machu Pichu I hope.

Just seeing if anyone is on a similar schedule for some of those CA border crossings. I am hearing its real nice to have a wing man just to make things go a little more smoothly.

Shoot a reply or send a PM.

Later
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Old 10-03-2012, 07:01 AM   #386
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AK Smitty View Post
I am moving my bike south a couple weeks at a time now.

Starting Nov 27 I have 3-4 months off and I am heading South to...IDK!!! Peru and Machu Pichu I hope.

Just seeing if anyone is on a similar schedule for some of those CA border crossings. I am hearing its real nice to have a wing man just to make things go a little more smoothly.

Shoot a reply or send a PM.

Later
I went through CA in December 2011 solo, and the border crossings were a breeze, with the exception of a five-hour wait getting into El Salvador, and that was only because there was only one official on duty to verify VINs on incoming vehicles. I found the crossings to be an interesting part of the trip.

You will encounter long lines of trucks at many of the crossings, especially in December as many people are trying to get home for la navidad, but being on a moto, you can just drive up to the front of the line.

Bringing lots of copies of your documents speed the process, although some borders require copies of recently-stamped passport pages, which obviously can't be done in advance.

The basic process is the same everywhere, migration first, then customs, whether you're coming in or going out. The rest they'll guide you.

Tell any "helpers" to get lost, you don't need them. They actually slow down the process.
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Old 10-07-2012, 06:50 PM   #387
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Originally Posted by Parcero View Post
I went through CA in December 2011 solo, and the border crossings were a breeze, with the exception of a five-hour wait getting into El Salvador, and that was only because there was only one official on duty to verify VINs on incoming vehicles. I found the crossings to be an interesting part of the trip.

You will encounter long lines of trucks at many of the crossings, especially in December as many people are trying to get home for la navidad, but being on a moto, you can just drive up to the front of the line.

Bringing lots of copies of your documents speed the process, although some borders require copies of recently-stamped passport pages, which obviously can't be done in advance.

The basic process is the same everywhere, migration first, then customs, whether you're coming in or going out. The rest they'll guide you.

Tell any "helpers" to get lost, you don't need them. They actually slow down the process.
Completely disagree about the helpers,
I've ridden through Central America three times and on to Tierra Del Fuego Twice.
I've found the helpers at several of the boarders, really expedite
the crossing process.
Several times I've had bus loads of people lined up in front of me
and the helpers turned the process in to a 20 minute even,
It was $15 well spent
I usually offer a bonus for shorter transit through the border.

Once you get to South America the borders are more transparent
and I did not really have need of their services.
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Old 10-08-2012, 12:42 PM   #388
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Completely disagree about the helpers,
I've ridden through Central America three times and on to Tierra Del Fuego Twice.
I've found the helpers at several of the boarders, really expedite
the crossing process.
Several times I've had bus loads of people lined up in front of me
and the helpers turned the process in to a 20 minute even,
It was $15 well spent
I usually offer a bonus for shorter transit through the border.

Once you get to South America the borders are more transparent
and I did not really have need of their services.
Man, MAXVERT, I envy you. I hope that I can do my trip down to TDF two more times, por lo menos! But I don't know if my wife would buy the "once in a lifetime opportunity" line two more times. I might hit you up for some rout advice as I get farther south, if you don't mind.

Sounds like you had a good experience with "helpers," but I met an American couple entering El Salvador who where at the border for several hours because they had given all of there documents to a "helper" who disappeared on them. There was nothing anyone could do to help since the couple had no travel documents, except try to find the guy, who was still AWOL when I left.

As for bus passengers, I was told by border agents that I could cut in front of them since I was a single traveller. This occurred in Nicaragua and Costa Rica. I doubt that going to the head of the line cost the bus more than about five minutes extra. I was not asked for any money.

Bottom line, I guess, is that all border crossings can be different experiences depending on the border, time of day, border agents' attitudes, and many other factors, but in the end you will get through. My point was simply, don't sweat the border crossings--they're just part of the process.
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Old 10-08-2012, 01:30 PM   #389
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AK Smitty View Post
I am moving my bike south a couple weeks at a time now.

Starting Nov 27 I have 3-4 months off and I am heading South to...IDK!!! Peru and Machu Pichu I hope.

Just seeing if anyone is on a similar schedule for some of those CA border crossings. I am hearing its real nice to have a wing man just to make things go a little more smoothly.

Shoot a reply or send a PM.

Later
Hi, it looks like I'll be a little behind you. We're leaving Seattle around Jan 1 and plan on crossing into Mexico on January 14 or 15th. Down Baja and the ferry across then south to Panama. Then somehow (TBD) from Panama to Cartagana and Sur. We are a group of 6 on various BMW's. Shouldn't be too hard to miss if you see us. Bookmark my SPOT link in my sig. I'll have it on while travelling. When will you cross into Mexico?
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Old 10-09-2012, 04:24 AM   #390
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We are a group of 6 on various BMW's. Shouldn't be too hard to miss if you see us.
No kidding!
Though your lack of Gucci luggage will likely separate you from the usual group of 6 BMW riders in Mexico.
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