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Old 08-16-2006, 07:07 PM   #31
salcar
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff Munn


I will offer this advice, even though it may not be completely legal. You can decide if you wish to follow it. Legally, you must export yourself and your vehicle when departing Mexico. However, if you are enroute to Panama, and plan on returning to the USA thru Mexico, you can avoid having to pay the visa and vehicle import fee twice, using this technique. We failed to do this and it doubled our fees for crossing Mexico. Pilot showed us this technique, and had no problems.


The other unique issue is that your tourist fee must be paid at a Mexico Bank, sometime during your stay, and prior to departing. These banks ARE NOT at the border, so make sure you find one, pay the fee and get the appropriate stamped documents before you head to the border to depart Mexico for the last time.

Now for your vehicle importation. Remember the Vehicle registration validity period is tied to the visa period. You will have to pay the vehicle importation fee to a special Banjercito that will probably be several miles from the actual border (remember that free trade zone?). On departure, you MUST remember to find the Banjercito office at the ADUANA that will out process you.
I crossed the border at Nogales. I was able to avoid going throuh the shaddy city by taking the MARIPOSA rd. If i remember correctly is exit number 139 there is a Carls Junior and a Valero where you can get gas one last time. Once you get of Mariposa you need to take a right.

I crossed around 11am. There was no line at all. The "offices" to get the importation paper work and visa are at km 21. When i got there nobody was there. I first had to file the paper work for my visa - i just had to show my passport. Then I went to another building where i handed my documents including registration and driver license. then they sent me to make copies of my documents each copy was 25 cents. then i return to the other building. They had a Banjercito right there so i was able to pay all the fees on the spot with a credit card.

I followed Jeff advice and got the Visa for 6 months however the vehicle can only stay in the country for 3 months at a time.


the lady there said that the visa is valid for multiple entries however the vehicle importation is not because you need to give back the sticker once you leave the country.

once i was done with my paperwork another person showed up behind me.

the whole process took me approx. 40 min from when i shut off the engine and turned it back on.
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Old 09-06-2006, 08:40 AM   #32
Nata Harli
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Great Idea

Quote:
Originally Posted by Django Loco
Hey Jeff,
This is most definitley Sticky material. Probably the most useful document
I've seen on ADVrider.

The problem, as I've complained about many times, is that there is really no
trip planning forum at ADVrider. This type of info really has no place given
the current set up.

The Upcoming forum is all about group rides and events with endless crap about where everyone is going to meet up on the first day. Useless.

The regional forums don't even have a Mexico or S. America section.

Its not a Ride Report, cause it hasn't happened yet.

So tell me.. where does this type of important travel information belong?

I've bitched and moaned about this for a year or so. The Mods don't care
or don't get it.

We NEED a Trip Planning forum. A place were solid and proven advice like
yours can be dissiminated, shared and added to. A place where travel questions can be answered and specific current info can be exchanged.

HU is good for this but is little used and is mostly European. HU is helpful and
Grant's site is great, but I think ADVrider could do something just as good.

STICKY? HELL YES!!!

I propose this Thread be moved....into a New Forum.
Trip Planning.
Mr. Loco,
I have to agree 100% with you on this. I'm getting ready to ride from Matamoros to Manangua in January and it's really hard finding info from those who have made similar trips and made posts like this excellent one. Here's my vote for creating a Trip Planning forum and also for making this the first sticky in that forum.

STICKY? HELL YES!!!

TRIP PLANNING FORUM? DOUBLE HELL YES!!!
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Old 10-17-2006, 07:30 PM   #33
Jeff Munn OP
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Where did this go?

I guess I don't understand ADVrider. This disappeared from Outer Darkness. Guess I need to post it to my own website so it doesn't get lost in cyberspace. Several people have asked about it, so I'm posting this to see if it reappears.

jeff
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Old 10-17-2006, 07:49 PM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff Munn
I guess I don't understand ADVrider. This disappeared from Outer Darkness. Guess I need to post it to my own website so it doesn't get lost in cyberspace. Several people have asked about it, so I'm posting this to see if it reappears.

jeff
Good info, Sir Munn.
And a nice ride report to boot.
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Old 11-10-2006, 09:55 PM   #35
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great info. what i do is i scan all my paper work .. so if anything happens i can go to a cyber cafe open yahoo,( or what ever) and get all my info
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Old 11-11-2006, 03:06 PM   #36
Aussie_Gringo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff Munn
I guess I don't understand ADVrider. This disappeared from Outer Darkness. Guess I need to post it to my own website so it doesn't get lost in cyberspace. Several people have asked about it, so I'm posting this to see if it reappears.

jeff
Jeff:

Leaving for C.A. in a few weeks and I'm planning on re-posting your excellent tips on riding Central America in the initial portion of the ride report. I have followed each precaution you've advised, although the completion of a will (per your recomendation) was not a highlight of the pre-trip planning .

I've searched for credible travel info and found your advice to be the most sound.....


Thanks again.....
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Old 11-12-2006, 03:21 PM   #37
Jammin
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Jeff, thanx for taking the time to post this comprehensive guide to touring in Central America. That is exactly what my friends and I are planning for next year. I'll probably be asking you a few specific questions as our planning gets underway.

Once again, thanx.
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Old 11-12-2006, 05:04 PM   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rous44
Django Loco

You don't need import papers for the ferry????

I have always been told it was an absolute requirment. Planning on taking the ferry from La Paz to Mazatlan this fall. I think I will still get all the paper work, just in case. It would be good to know in case I was travelling in Baja sometime and decided to ferry over to the mainland.
i took the topo ferry to la paz last weekend and was not asked for anything other than identification and money. if you are going beyond sonora or baja you do need import papers for the bike, that you are asked for them is another matter. we had to show them at 2 of the 5-6 checkpoints we went through.
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Old 11-21-2006, 07:53 AM   #39
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Spanish/English moto mini dictionary

How come this isn't stickied yet? Does this forum NOT HAVE a moderator or something? I'm leaving for Mexico next month and have been rereading this thread for its very useful info and realized I have something to give back. I speak kind of crap spanish, but this was posted to the KLR list awhile back and I saved it. Worth printing out and carrying with, I'd think:

From: Juan Carlos Ibarra

Tire llanta
Sproket sprocket or corona
Chain cadena
Link eslabón
Pin perno
Nut tuerca
Bolt tornillo
Spoke rayo
Wheel rin
Bearing balero
Foot Peg posa pie
Lever palanca
Brakes frenos
Brake pad balata
Brake line manguera de freno
Brake fluid liquido de frenos
Radiator radiador
Fan abanico or ventilador
Head cabeza
Cam rod árbol de levas
Connecting Rod biela
Piston pistón
Rings anillos
Cylinder liner camisa
Cylinder cilindro
Crank shaft cigüeñal
Oil seal retén de aceite
Gasket junta
Hose manguera
Spring resorte
Handlebar manubrio
Valve shims pastillas, calibradores, lainas de calibración
Valves válvulas
Exhaust escape
Intake admisión
Balancer contrapeso
Grips puños
Windshield parabrisas
C clip seguro
Cotter pin chaveta
Shrouder tolva
Lamp faro
Tail lamp calavera
Bulb foco
Fuse fusible
Cable cable
Shock amortiguador
Inner tube cámara

TOOLS:

Spanner llave española
Screwdriver desarmador (philips) de cruz (Sloted) plano
Allen wrench llave allen
Pliers pinzas
Vice grips pinzas de presión
Ratchet wrench matraca
Box wrench dados
Tire iron espátulas
Adjustable wrench perico
Condom condón

Edit:
Having returned from this trip, let me add one more little suggestions. If you have a really fat bike or boxes that are a hassle to remove, get a scrap of string and tie two knots in it that exactly line up with your bikes widest parts (not the handlebars if that's it, since they waggle). When you're trying to figure out if your bike will or won't fit through some hotel lobby, pull the string out of your pocket and save yourself the hassle and embarrassment of getting halfway in (or up a half dozen steps and through the first of two doors) and not making it the last bit. At the end of a long day, especially if you're at the second or third hotel after dealing with traffic in some city, it's worth it to save the little effort.
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ldeikis screwed with this post 02-27-2007 at 01:30 PM
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Old 11-21-2006, 10:20 AM   #40
pilot
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I cross posted this here so it would be easier to find.
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Old 11-21-2006, 02:06 PM   #41
slideways
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The best method other than living in a Spanish speaking country to learn Spanish is the Rosetta Stone Spanish Speaking CD's.

The more Spanish you know the better your experience south of the border will be.
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Old 11-21-2006, 03:32 PM   #42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slideways
The best method other than living in a Spanish speaking country to learn Spanish is the Rosetta Stone Spanish Speaking CD's.

The more Spanish you know the better your experience south of the border will be.

I second that. Traveling by myself without knowing hardly any Spanish made me feel isolated, even in crowds. A weeks worth in Guatemala last winter really helped, but next trip I'm doing the emersion route for two or three weeks.
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Old 11-21-2006, 05:31 PM   #43
ldeikis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slideways
The best method other than living in a Spanish speaking country to learn Spanish is the Rosetta Stone Spanish Speaking CD's.

The more Spanish you know the better your experience south of the border will be.
I agree on both counts. I took a few years of high school spanish years ago and was blown away by both how much I remembered and how much more fun I had being able to flounder through conversations (this was on a trip to costa rica). I think being confident and not giving a damn if I looked like a fool helped, too. Since this trip is longer I borrowed a rosetta stone CD from a buddy and wow--amazing how you retain stuff learned that way. It takes a bit of discipline to make yourself consistently do a lesson a night (or whatever) but man, I can talk about children leaping off picnic tables til I'm blue in the face. I didn't get to the part where they try to explain that they've blown a seal in their KLRs shock absorber, though. Maybe that's in the third CD?



Luke
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Old 11-21-2006, 06:39 PM   #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pilot
I second that. Traveling by myself without knowing hardly any Spanish made me feel isolated, even in crowds. A weeks worth in Guatemala last winter really helped, but next trip I'm doing the emersion route for two or three weeks.
Everybody is different in regards to how they soak it up and use what they've learned.

A few years ago while eating breakfast in Batopilas, hardybaker told me that if I didn't learn some spanish I was cheating myself. I don't mind traveling in countries where i don't understand the language, but knew he was right. And because I planned to start spending more time south of the border I decided to take a few classes.

I did a week (5 days) of 3 hrs per day in San Cristobal a couple of years ago and thoroughly enjoyed it. After I got back home, it felt like it was all lost, but on my next trip things kinda clicked again.

Last year I did another week of 4 hrs per day in Antigua and that was fun. More was clicking and I would engage the locals more often.

IMHO, one week isn't nearly enough, but I can't stay in one place for very long. I think 2 weeks of classes would be worth 3x 1 week in comprehension. Using (or at least trying to) is the key. Don't be shy and don't be afraid of seeming stupid. 99% of the people are helpful.
Try asking for WD-40 (in what Spanish you know) in a ferreteria and watch the counter guys laugh.

I'm planning to do another 4 hr per day week in both Oaxaca and in Grenada this winter.

Donde esta la tienda economica parra muchas cervezas frias?
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Old 11-21-2006, 08:41 PM   #45
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lone Rider
Donde esta la tienda economica parra muchas cervezas frias?
Or....?Donde se queda una tienda que se vende cerveza bien fria y muy barrata?

Lone, you are right, 5 days is not going to get it. Emersion only works if your emersed for at least a couple months and already have a good basic high school Spanish background. Best to find a night class or weekends
or whatever at a local community college or high school.

I've not tried the Rosetta Stone but I hear its quite good. But IMO, nothing
can beat a really good language teacher. I've had many, started in
7th grade in Spanish and took it all the way through college. A good teacher
can change your whole experience.

If you get a bum teacher....leave....go find a better one who has a very good
sense of humor. They are out there.
Spanish class is FUN! And its taught everywhere, not expensive.

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