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Old 05-20-2014, 07:24 AM   #33481
Mr Head
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Those are what I've been meaning to order.
I used to ride latex tubes all the time. Back when I had sponsorship.
Thanks I put them on my wish list on Amazon. Maybe that will remind me to buy them when I get home.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Ridge View Post
Switch to Vittoria Latex. They are the only tubes I will use and you will thank me. The ride quality is superb but they do require topping off daily or pre-ride (which any good bike rider does anyway). A bit more spendy than traditional butyl tubes but the Vittoria will last me an entire season without fail. I'll swap them out annually if I don't have any roadside changes during the regular riding season.

Between those tubes and the GP4000-4 season tires, I'll easily get 5K miles with just a minimal flat spot on the rear.
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Old 05-20-2014, 08:21 AM   #33482
fullmonte
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Head View Post
Those are what I've been meaning to order.
I used to ride latex tubes all the time. Back when I had sponsorship.
Thanks I put them on my wish list on Amazon. Maybe that will remind me to buy them when I get home.
I hope those Vittorias are stronger than the Challenge latex tubes. I carried a Challenge as a spare (because that was all the LBS had in stock) and had to use it last summer. It popped as soon as I put air in it during a roadside tire change (and I've changed many, so it wasn't my technique). Had to thumb a ride home that day from a local business owner. I'll take heavy and reliable over light and fragile any day. Never again will I try those overpriced latex tubes.
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Old 05-20-2014, 08:25 AM   #33483
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They are. Like I said, I'll get 5K easily out of a single set of tubes. Those are racing and training miles over all types of paved surfaces and a few gravel connecting roads on occasion. I've not tried the Challenge latex tubes yet and will give two thumbs up for the Vittoria. It's the same tubes they run in their Corsa CX tubulars.
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Old 05-20-2014, 08:51 AM   #33484
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I found a shop on my way home that is supposed to carry Vittoria. I'll stop and see what they have.
Back in the day, I ran Specialized folding Turbo tires and latex tubes. I had a buddy who had never had clinchers since getting a racing bicycle twenty years before. We swapped wheels one evening out on a ride and he became a convert.
A susual back then guys would tain on $20/tire cotton sew-ups and save the $75/tire silks for races.
He thought the Turbo's felt like silk.
They were.
I still have at least one Continental folding tire in the shop that is an 18mm wide tire.
At the Boulder Criterium an official I didn't know, (I was a bike race official and worked a lot of races from motorcycles) did not believe my turbo was a clincher. So he was trying to roll it off the rim at inspection. I told him I'd give him $20 if he could do it.
My tires were pumped to 120 psi. And that was a clincher. It did not roll. It tore the calluses off his palms.
The head official came by and said. Those are clinchers, Dick doesn't run sew-ups except on TT wheels.
Guy went off in a huff to find some bandages.
I had silks sew-ups on my trackbike, just because that was the rims that came on it. I sold the bike after a few years of driving all the way to the track, 80 miles one way only to get kicked off by some national team. I decided it was a waste of time and money and sold the bike on AOL.
Something that took about an hour.

I've rolled sew-ups off a rim as an official, with still wet glue under them. And I've been on the motorcycle leading a crit when a guy rolled a tire going into a turn. Aluminum has very little grip on a city street. The sound is cringe inducing.
I have heard that sound ahead of me and behind me while racing. Makes the hair stand on the back of my neck. Might as well be fingernails on a chalkboard.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ridge View Post
They are. Like I said, I'll get 5K easily out of a single set of tubes. Those are racing and training miles over all types of paved surfaces and a few gravel connecting roads on occasion. I've not tried the Challenge latex tubes yet and will give two thumbs up for the Vittoria. It's the same tubes they run in their Corsa CX tubulars.
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Old 05-20-2014, 09:48 AM   #33485
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aurelius View Post
Just got back from a test ride in which I compared a relatively cheap set of stock aluminum wheels which came with one of my bikes to a $2000+ set of CF wheels. After about a dozen trips up and down a nearby brick road, I honestly can't say that the $2000+ wheels did any better at absorbing road bumps. Makes me wonder how many customers just swallowed the salesman's hype and shelled out two grand.
My buddy (known to me, at least, as "Mr Carbon Fiber") would have
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Old 05-20-2014, 09:53 AM   #33486
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aurelius View Post
I did this project for two reasons: one was to save loads of money, and the other was because I wanted to find out how modern road bikes go together. The last time I did any wrenching on bikes was when I was a teenager back in the 70's. Those bikes were a LOT easier to work on.

The Roubaix is a great bike. I've been looking for something a more comfortable than my Specialized S-Works Venge, which is a very fast but uncompromising race bike. After 30 miles, I just want to quit riding it. Yesterday I rode 60 miles on the Roubaix, and could easily have done another 20 or so if I'd had enough time. I never thought I'd say it, but I'm actually considering entering the Horrible Hundred this year.
Great Job

I feel more inclined/comfortable working on bikes/cars than I do bicycles (not that I am much of a mechanic on either) but it's something I do want to do. Did you need to use many specialized tools for the job ? How did you know what to do - book/mechanic ?
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Old 05-20-2014, 09:57 AM   #33487
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Park Tool has a lot of information on how to. Also searching any how to question will bring up Sheldon Brown's stuff.
Lots of YouTube.
Gummee! can probably give you the best list of tools.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mercury264 View Post
Great Job

I feel more inclined/comfortable working on bikes/cars than I do bicycles (not that I am much of a mechanic on either) but it's something I do want to do. Did you need to use many specialized tools for the job ? How did you know what to do - book/mechanic ?
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Old 05-20-2014, 10:00 AM   #33488
Mercury264
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Head View Post
Park Tool has a lot of information on how to. Also searching any how to question will bring up Sheldon Brown's stuff.
Lots of YouTube.
Gummee! can probably give you the best list of tools.


I have a really nice Park Tool stand and a good selection of general-purpose tools so I really just need to get off my fat arse and get round to it. I might start with my roller/trainer bike before I attempt to work on my 'good' bike. I think, for now at least, I just need to take the crank apart as it's creaking like crazy - pedals also I think.
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Old 05-20-2014, 11:14 AM   #33489
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mercury264 View Post
Great Job

I feel more inclined/comfortable working on bikes/cars than I do bicycles (not that I am much of a mechanic on either) but it's something I do want to do. Did you need to use many specialized tools for the job ? How did you know what to do - book/mechanic ?
I'd just taken the old bike apart, so putting the parts on the new frame was mostly a matter of doing everything I'd already done in reverse. There are a few tricks I had to learn in terms of the order of assembly and where to apply non-seize compound, but fortunately I had a shop mechanic nearby who walked me through it.

As far as tools go, almost everything was done with just a set of metric Allen wrenches. Other things I needed were a chain breaker, a tool needed to remove a plastic plug on the Dura Ace crank, wire cutters to trim the cables to their correct length, and a crimping tool to fasten the little metal sleeves to the ends of the cables. Oh, and a hacksaw and guide for cutting the carbon fiber head tube to the correct length. If you plan to swap wheels like I did, you also need two special tools to remove the cassette from the old rear wheel and attach it to the new hub.

The only thing the shop mechanic did was to make the adjustments to the derailleurs so that they would shift properly. I probably could have figured it out with some experimentation, but by that time I just wanted to get out of the store and ride.
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Old 05-20-2014, 11:24 AM   #33490
Jenn
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Quote:
Originally Posted by k7 View Post
Once you're "comfortable" on the bike, I'm convinced the rest is all refueling - what you take in for food and drink - that keeps you moving. For most people working on performance, it's more difficult to get the right mixture of intake that doesn't impact them in many other ways ie upset stomach, diarrhea, etc.
I managed to eliminate those symptoms by going vegan several years ago.

Quote:
Originally Posted by k7 View Post
On the other hand, this is a "fun" ride and you're doing roughly a metric century a day on average. Again, it's the 7 days in a row that'll get you. Fit-wise, your current regimen says you could probably do it now. With your proposed schedule, getting those miles added as a good base will make it more enjoyable!
You know, after looking over the mileage and the climbing - I feel like it's really do-able. I have had no tiredness or DOMS after Sunday's ride (other than being very hungry - but that's what happens when you have 90 calories of electrolyte drink, a peach and two slices of chocolate sourdough and go for a ride at noon).

I've always wanted to do a longer multi-day event like this -- and even signed up for the tent & luggage service.

My friend objected saying "I don't MIND putting up my tent myself" ... "and taking it down" ...

I pointed out "7 days in a row of standing in line to get your bag with your tent AND then setting it up instead of just going right to the beer garden, getting clean clothes already waiting in a tent already set up and showering" plus "we're middle aged, it's a tour not a competition."

Can't argue with that logic, right? He agreed it was probably a good idea.

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We expect lots of picture when you return with your ride report. I imagine it'll be spectacular!
Thanks - there will be loads!
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Old 05-20-2014, 11:31 AM   #33491
k7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jenn View Post
I've always wanted to do a longer multi-day event like this -- and even signed up for the tent & luggage service.

My friend objected saying "I don't MIND putting up my tent myself" ... "and taking it down" ...

I pointed out "7 days in a row of standing in line to get your bag with your tent AND then setting it up instead of just going right to the beer garden, getting clean clothes already waiting in a tent already set up and showering" plus "we're middle aged, it's a tour not a competition."

Can't argue with that logic, right? He agreed it was probably a good idea.



Thanks - there will be loads!
Very smart. We did the charter service deal during Ragbrai and it was worth every penny. The only issue was that I was always up early enough and arrived at the next town before the team was able relocate to that town.

I don't think I had that true Ragbrai spirit - up at 0530, on the road by 0600 and at the next town usually by 11 at the very, very latest. I enjoyed riding in the early morning temps when the roads weren't quite as busy. I also tended to notice the same people over and over. Birds of a feather I suppose.
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Old 05-20-2014, 11:49 AM   #33492
Mr Head
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I tend to rise early, but am lazy.
Coffee.
Get the body moving a bit.
I can eat pretty much anything.
I prefer to deal with my own gear.
The only reason I'm doing this is to ride with my brother for a week. I'm not much of a crowd guy. I went to one BMWMOA rally, and left after the first night. Too many 12 year-old middle aged people away from home for the first time, or so it seemed. Got food poisoning so by the next evening when I should have been enjoying dinner I was sprinting to the toilet. A grand old time for sure.


By about 1 AM I was good to go.

A good amount of water through me was fixed up with a great breakfast the next morning out in a little town.
I did a couple of RawHyde Rally's with some friends. We all thought there were too many people. It was fun for us, since we pretty much ran off on our own away from the carnage.
RAGBRAI will be an excuse to relax a little and just enjoy riding with my brother.

Quote:
Originally Posted by k7 View Post
Very smart. We did the charter service deal during Ragbrai and it was worth every penny. The only issue was that I was always up early enough and arrived at the next town before the team was able relocate to that town.

I don't think I had that true Ragbrai spirit - up at 0530, on the road by 0600 and at the next town usually by 11 at the very, very latest. I enjoyed riding in the early morning temps when the roads weren't quite as busy. I also tended to notice the same people over and over. Birds of a feather I suppose.
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Old 05-20-2014, 11:51 AM   #33493
Ridge
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yeah, the rule of RAGBRAI that I always struggled with is "you have to let it develop". This was relayed to me by the veterans that would always accompany us. Me, being Mr. Speedy always wanted to open up the throttle on those long stretches of Iowa pavement... especially with a steady tailwind. It's like having the Nurburgring at your disposal with a Veyron all your own. You just want to see what's possible...

However; with rides like RAGBRAI, you have to slow down... lag a little bit, stop in the towns along the route and take in the local flavor. Before you know it, you're watching the shenanigans happen before your eyes. Drunken mudslides into farm ponds that may or may not have clothing, beer handups as you pedal through town and much more that can't really be described other than to say you need to see to believe. I once had to do a keg stand in an overnight town just to borrow another team's water hose... it's like Mardi Gras on bicycles. You just gotta slow down and let it develop.
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Old 05-20-2014, 01:32 PM   #33494
TheYeti
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Between those tubes and the GP4000-4 season tires, I'll easily get 5K miles with just a minimal flat spot on the rear.[/QUOTE]



That's because you're so damn light. I get same mileage with a big flat spot.
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Old 05-20-2014, 01:47 PM   #33495
TheYeti
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Head View Post
I found a shop on my way home that is supposed to carry Vittoria. I'll stop and see what they have.
Back in the day, I ran Specialized folding Turbo tires and latex tubes. I had a buddy who had never had clinchers since getting a racing bicycle twenty years before. We swapped wheels one evening out on a ride and he became a convert.
A susual back then guys would tain on $20/tire cotton sew-ups and save the $75/tire silks for races.
He thought the Turbo's felt like silk.
They were.
I still have at least one Continental folding tire in the shop that is an 18mm wide tire.
At the Boulder Criterium an official I didn't know, (I was a bike race official and worked a lot of races from motorcycles) did not believe my turbo was a clincher. So he was trying to roll it off the rim at inspection. I told him I'd give him $20 if he could do it.
My tires were pumped to 120 psi. And that was a clincher. It did not roll. It tore the calluses off his palms.
The head official came by and said. Those are clinchers, Dick doesn't run sew-ups except on TT wheels.
Guy went off in a huff to find some bandages.
I had silks sew-ups on my trackbike, just because that was the rims that came on it. I sold the bike after a few years of driving all the way to the track, 80 miles one way only to get kicked off by some national team. I decided it was a waste of time and money and sold the bike on AOL.
Something that took about an hour.

I've rolled sew-ups off a rim as an official, with still wet glue under them. And I've been on the motorcycle leading a crit when a guy rolled a tire going into a turn. Aluminum has very little grip on a city street. The sound is cringe inducing.
I have heard that sound ahead of me and behind me while racing. Makes the hair stand on the back of my neck. Might as well be fingernails on a chalkboard.
It's even more interesting (and not in the good way) when it happens to you. I skipped the tire on a bumpy Crit course, going in a corner. Bam Was on the ground.Didn't know what happened. No fun
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