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Old 02-05-2010, 10:15 AM   #13306
Oznerol
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I made a bad bicycling decision of my own a few weeks back: Registration opened for D2R2:

http://www.franklinlandtrust.org/randonnee.html

...and I signed up for the long 180k route.

I've done the 100k version each of the last two years. The first year was pretty grueling but satisfying. The second year I was in poorer cycling condition, but had a better mindset about it and paced myself more carefully. So while I took longer than the first year, I finished the ride with a good bit left in the tank.

But I think it's going to take more than the right mindset to get me through the long one.


I'm also thinking about doing this charity ride from Boston to New York, with some of my coworkers who are also bike nuts:

http://www.tristatetrek.com/
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Old 02-05-2010, 10:19 AM   #13307
bergermeister
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who makes a comfortable seat for a reasonable price? mine isn't doing me any favors, especially on the trainer.
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Old 02-05-2010, 10:36 AM   #13308
HardCase
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pierce
forgot to add, the soles of the old school bike shoes were hard as a carved piece of wood. I don't remember what brand the 'good ones' were, but they were always black, very thin perforated leather tops, and that hard leather sole which also had a shaped steel band riveted in. really uncomfortable to walk even a short distance in, but great on the bike.
I remember those shoes from the 70s and early 80s too, weren't they Sidis? I think there were other brands, but that one sticks in my mind. I may even still have a pair in a box somewhere. I've got a couple pair of the old Look shoes from the late 80s, the ones that were red, yellow, white and I think gray, plus a pair of the old Look white pedals too. Hell, those things are probably antiques and collector's items nowadays.
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Old 02-05-2010, 11:04 AM   #13309
k7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pierce
forgot to add, the soles of the old school bike shoes were hard as a carved piece of wood. I don't remember what brand the 'good ones' were, but they were always black, very thin perforated leather tops, and that hard leather sole which also had a shaped steel band riveted in. really uncomfortable to walk even a short distance in, but great on the bike.
I'm thinking Diadora. Mine were purchased in 1977 in Austin TX at a shop that was literally the closest shop to San Antonio that carried bicycling clothing and shoes. Your description fits them to a tee.

It was always fun to walk in them - 'click/clack/scraaaap'
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Old 02-05-2010, 11:44 AM   #13310
pierce
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Quote:
Originally Posted by k7
I'm thinking Diadora. Mine were purchased in 1977 in Austin TX at a shop that was literally the closest shop to San Antonio that carried bicycling clothing and shoes. Your description fits them to a tee.

It was always fun to walk in them - 'click/clack/scraaaap'
yeah, a couple of my friends had these sandal like things you could slip over them for walking, gave you a heel and protected the metal cleat from getting bashed up on the pavement. I never did bother to get those.
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Old 02-05-2010, 11:51 AM   #13311
Askel
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bergermeister
who makes a comfortable seat for a reasonable price? mine isn't doing me any favors, especially on the trainer.

I frickin' love the cheapo "racelux" saddles that came stock on treks for years. My dealer has a bin full of 'em for $5.

Which is good, because they last about 20 minutes under me in serious offroad use.
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Old 02-05-2010, 12:13 PM   #13312
k7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pierce
yeah, a couple of my friends had these sandal like things you could slip over them for walking, gave you a heel and protected the metal cleat from getting bashed up on the pavement. I never did bother to get those.
You know, I never saw those - I had the same cleats for years - those things were almost impossible to wear out in normal usage. It's not like you *wanted* to walk that far anyway.
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Old 02-05-2010, 03:12 PM   #13313
bergermeister
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Askel
I frickin' love the cheapo "racelux" saddles that came stock on treks for years. My dealer has a bin full of 'em for $5.

Which is good, because they last about 20 minutes under me in serious offroad use.
thanks man, I'll check it out. certainly can't get hurt on the investment.
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Old 02-05-2010, 04:27 PM   #13314
Gummee!
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The metal don't *usually* break. They DO wear out tho

M
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Old 02-05-2010, 06:24 PM   #13315
Hair
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I got that sinking feeling.

So I am not 24 hours in to my new Stumpjumper comp carbon HT 29er. I blinged the hell out of this bike. The bike shop is supposed to be one of the better ones in the area. When I bought this bike one of the biggest selling points that they made was how good the warrantee is.

So tonight after work I wanted to install the water bottle cages. The screw sets on the bottom tube looked great. The ones on the seat post were pushed in. The top screw is loose and just spins. The bottom screw is off center and stuck in. Both sets are pushed way into the tube.

I call the bike shop. The first thing was that the guy who helped me roll the bike out the door yesterday didn't know me or the bike.

Next they start hemming and hawing about if it will be covered or not. And he even cried about having to strip the parts off to send it back.

I am so tired of dealing with the "New Mexico attitude" when it comes to work and or service.

I'm taking the bike back in the morning. It's going to cost me a day of skiing. I am really bummed about this. I've been looking at new off road bikes for the past few years. I have finally gotten where I can buy one. And now this.


Beyond that issue. I rode the bike up the street today. I am in-love with the big wheels.
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Old 02-05-2010, 06:37 PM   #13316
pierce
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hair
So tonight after work I wanted to install the water bottle cages. The screw sets on the bottom tube looked great. The ones on the seat post were pushed in. The top screw is loose and just spins. The bottom screw is off center and stuck in. Both sets are pushed way into the tube.
ouch. the attachment points on my 27 yr old steel frame Stumpie are bulletproof (like the rest of the bike). came with good stainless allen hardware in all the attachment points (rack, water bottles, fender)

sometimes going ultralight has its downsides. that carbon fiber stuff is fragile. mountain bikes get thrashed.

I still prefer the idea of anodized aluminum frames for modern mountain bikes.
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Old 02-05-2010, 06:46 PM   #13317
Gummee!
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hair
So tonight after work I wanted to install the water bottle cages. The screw sets on the bottom tube looked great. The ones on the seat post were pushed in. The top screw is loose and just spins. The bottom screw is off center and stuck in. Both sets are pushed way into the tube.
Pretty much anyone with a nut-cert tool can reinstall them riv-nuts. I had one of mine on an AL S-Works do the same thing. You can get riv-nut tools at Harbor Freight IIRC. I understand whatcha mean about the new bike being perfect tho.

Quote:
Beyond that issue. I rode the bike up the street today. I am in-love with the big wheels.
S'why I ride my cyclocross bike off-road. Rolls over stuff mo bettah.

I think the next bike I buy will be a 29er. That means I gotta get a new fork insteada re-using my 'Zocchi for a 26er. Anyone need some non-disc Mavic Cross-whatevers?

M
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Old 02-05-2010, 08:54 PM   #13318
pierce
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gummee!
Pretty much anyone with a nut-cert tool can reinstall them riv-nuts. I had one of mine on an AL S-Works do the same thing. You can get riv-nut tools at Harbor Freight IIRC. I understand whatcha mean about the new bike being perfect tho.
on a carbon fiber frame, I can't help but think that will leave some ugly juju behind.
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Old 02-05-2010, 10:40 PM   #13319
slackmeyer
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skwidd
I tend to move my feet around a bit much for normal road pedals, and I was originally steered toward the mountain SPD's because they were way easy to bail out of when the tension is set soft.
I don't like and won't use SPD's on my mountain bike at all.
The road pedal would probably help correct what is obviously poor feet positioning, but the only ones I've checked out made me feel like I was stuck in an old ski binding that wouldn't release.
There have to be some that let you move around a bit, and are easy to yank out of, but I'll probably end up with 2-sided newer SPD's.
I've got a few pair of Time mountain pedals if you want to try some out. Lot's of float- I've just switched over to SPD (mountain and road) for a little less float, and slightly faster release. I've never had a problem with hotspots on my feet- actually, the main problem I've had with my feet is that if I wear shoes that are too stiff, my toes go to sleep. Mountain bike shoes seem to be ok, but road shoes not so much. It's about time to give road shoes another try though. . . .

I heard recently that it's usually better to place the cleat pretty far back on the shoe. Using the muscles in your foot/ankle to pedal is good for very short sprints, but not so good for the longer rides. Anyway, it's worked for me- adjust seat to go with the new cleat position, of course.
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Old 02-05-2010, 10:58 PM   #13320
pierce
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slackmeyer
I've got a few pair of Time mountain pedals if you want to try some out. Lot's of float- I've just switched over to SPD (mountain and road) for a little less float, and slightly faster release. I've never had a problem with hotspots on my feet- actually, the main problem I've had with my feet is that if I wear shoes that are too stiff, my toes go to sleep. Mountain bike shoes seem to be ok, but road shoes not so much. It's about time to give road shoes another try though. . . .
hmm, that sounds too tight, not too stiff. i bought a pair of them old hardsole italian shoes that were 1/2 size too tight, they never let me forget it, ended up giving that pair to a friend and buying a new pair in the right + .5 size that fit me properly.
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