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Old 09-13-2006, 09:43 AM   #76
BLUE(UK)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pughy
Blue

Lots of serious advice on here, think i'll do my usual get the f###in wheel off and attack it with plenty of gusto....if it goes titz up i'll have to take it to the tyre shop!
Should be OK in your garage(plenty of things to bash it with surely) but out on the trail is where i think the guys are saying it's a barsteward.
I do all my exc tyre changing with just tyre levers but i think when my 950adv rear tyre is bald i'll have a crack at it in the garage to see what's what.
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Old 09-15-2006, 01:40 PM   #77
Pughy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BLUE(UK)
Should be OK in your garage(plenty of things to bash it with surely) but out on the trail is where i think the guys are saying it's a barsteward.
I do all my exc tyre changing with just tyre levers but i think when my 950adv rear tyre is bald i'll have a crack at it in the garage to see what's what.
Off to do the Dyfi on the 450 .....have ordered my tyres so will give it a try at home....will let you know how I get on....with some piccys of the mayhem!!!
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Old 09-17-2006, 02:40 AM   #78
Mike955i
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Success the first time!

Well, after hearing all the horror stories about breaking the bead on the mighty 950 I was nervous about trying to install my new TKC's (and Bridgestone Ultra Heavy Duty tubes) in preparation for Creel. But time was slipping away so my BIL and I got together today for a tire/tube changing experiment. Aside from my 950's hoops we also had to put new DOT's on an XR650R, new UHD tubes in BIL's KLR and new UHD's in my 525EXC's tires. Quite the agenda.

An important point to make is that both BIL and I have attempted a tire/tube change before with no luck but we read Neduro's tire tips thread and I had read all the 950 discussions so we felt ready to try again. Plus, we had to know if we could do the deed in the middle of Mexico. We started with the XR's tire changes and after a little trouble getting started we had the first tube out and were working the front tire off. It was a bitch but came off with some damage to the old tire.

Before fitting the new tire we used some tire changing lube (purchased from Napa) and it was significantly easier to install the new tire. Keep the tire bead in the center of the rim and it goes on pretty easy. The last section is always the hardest but totally doable if you go slow and take small sections at a time. The rear was even tougher but the tire lube made it easy and it was done in no time. Confidence was growing.

Next up, the 9-fiddy! We jammed some lube into the gap using a tire iron and then tried to use just irons to break the bead - no joy. Next, I tried a prybar another user swore by but it just damaged the rim. We decided to try the sidestand trick using the KLR, wedging the tire under the stand and pushing down. I was expecting a fight but a little pressure and the bead popped right off. It was too f*n easy - what the hell? We pulled the tube and now needed to pop the bead on the other side. Sidestand to the rescue - POP! The tire pulled right off (Tire lube - buy some today!) and installing the TKC was just as easy; pop the tire on the rim, slip in the tube, inflate tube for structure, lube the tire again and lever the loose side onto the rim. Truth be told, we found wheels with rim locks harder to deal with than the 950 but all are do-able. The lube makes a HUGE difference in effort equired, although I'm sure more experienced guys dont need it at all.

So, that's it - the 950 was actually very easy to deal with and now we know we can do the deed in the field. I hope this is useful to those approaching the task for the first time. It is definitly easier with 2 people but the secret is real tire lube, get some today!

Cheers.....Mike
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Old 09-17-2006, 05:10 PM   #79
Katoum
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jhank
I'm in my 100 degree garage, swapping out the TKC's for the Scorps for some road ridin'. As I stand there catching my breath and cleaning the sweat off my glasses, it occurs to me that when the time comes and I do this in the dirt and rocks by the side of the road I'm gonna be risking some damage to the hubs and discs while wrestling with these monsters.

In the garage I'm kepping the hub ends and discs off the floor with some short pieces of 2x4. Anybody have recommendations for keeping the fragile bits from becoming to dinged up while on the side of the road?

Btw, the sidestand bead-breaking method works.
Gees, just find a dead log or similar material, never had to look to far myself.
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Old 09-18-2006, 08:25 PM   #80
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike955i
Well, after hearing all the horror stories about breaking the bead on the mighty 950 I was nervous about trying to install my new TKC's (and Bridgestone Ultra Heavy Duty tubes) in preparation for Creel.





Next up, the 9-fiddy! We jammed some lube into the gap using a tire iron and then tried to use just irons to break the bead - no joy. Next, I tried a prybar another user swore by but it just damaged the rim. We decided to try the sidestand trick using the KLR, wedging the tire under the stand and pushing down. I was expecting a fight but a little pressure and the bead popped right off. It was too f*n easy - what the hell? We pulled the tube and now needed to pop the bead on the other side. Sidestand to the rescue - POP! The tire pulled right off (Tire lube - buy some today!) and installing the TKC was just as easy; pop the tire on the rim, slip in the tube, inflate tube for structure, lube the tire again and lever the loose side onto the rim. Truth be told, we found wheels with rim locks harder to deal with than the 950 but all are do-able. The lube makes a HUGE difference in effort equired, although I'm sure more experienced guys dont need it at all.

So, that's it - the 950 was actually very easy to deal with and now we know we can do the deed in the field. I hope this is useful to those approaching the task for the first time. It is definitly easier with 2 people but the secret is real tire lube, get some today!

Cheers.....Mike

After reading this I decided I was going to give the "breakin the bead on the 950" a try. I was taking the bike in to get new tires put on anyway so I thought I would see if I could get the tube out using only what I would pack on the bike. First I tried the old "step on the bead and maybe it will break" trick. NO CHANCE. Then I looked at the bike sitting on the center stand and the side stand sticking out saying "use me, use me. I had already lubed up the bead the best I could so I figured I had nothing to lose. I jammed the side stand between the rim and the tire the best I could and slowly tipped the bike over on the tire. It was kind of a slow "wooosh" and the bead was broken. Wow, this was not hard at all. I could not pull the tube out without breaking the bead on the other side , so I flipped it over and "wooosh" Just as easy as the first side.
I had been worrying about what the heck I would do if I got a flat in the bush for about 8 months. It is very reassuring to know that it can be done without a lot of problems.
My rim is the 4.25 which I think is easier than the 4.00's
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Old 09-19-2006, 04:07 PM   #81
Mike955i
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Quote:
Originally Posted by canadasax
After reading this I decided I was going to give the "breakin the bead on the 950" a try... I jammed the side stand between the rim and the tire the best I could and slowly tipped the bike over on the tire. It was kind of a slow "wooosh" and the bead was broken. Wow, this was not hard at all...I had been worrying about what the heck I would do if I got a flat in the bush for about 8 months. It is very reassuring to know that it can be done without a lot of problems...
Yep, a whole lotta noise about nothing! Happy it worked out for you too.

Cheers....Mike
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Old 10-27-2006, 09:59 PM   #82
idahoskiguy
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I to decided to tackle the tire change to the new TKC's using only what I carry in the bike. Guess what? It all worked!!! Factory tool kit, two 12 inch tire irons, a little lube, side stand bread breaker, small 12 volt pump.

Glad I did this, sure better learning at home instead of out somewhere along side the trailin the dark. Having the confidence to repair a flat is a good thing.

Milling the rim is NOT nexessary.
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Old 10-28-2006, 06:08 AM   #83
rightsideup
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Quote:
Originally Posted by idahoskiguy
Milling the rim is NOT nexessary.
Agreed...
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Old 10-28-2006, 06:40 AM   #84
mattawa88
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flat head

I ground the bead down on the sprocket side to about half it's height, all the way around. I can pop the bead with the sidestand when I have tkc's mounted, some of the other tires I've tried don't have stiff enough sidewalls.
I rode the bike with a flat for about 25 miles, gravel and paved roads. I had an appointment I had to keep, so I rode it rather than change it. The 150/70 X18 TKC 80 stayed on the rim and there was no rim damage.
When I changed the tube I couldn't find any visible damage to the tire so I decided to run it on out, mostly on gravel.
Well of course at the last minute I decided to take my GF and the bike for an evening ride, got a flat about 20 miles from home. So I dropped her off and rode it home. All went fine until 2 miles from my shop, the tube ripped in two and bunched up on one side of the rim, sort of a rough ride. No damage to the rim, the tire was completely shot.
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Old 10-28-2006, 06:52 AM   #85
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Entertaining reading here. I thought it was a bitch breaking the bead on the rear of an FJR, even with lube and the 2 x 4 & Avalanche trick.
When I pick up my 950 next week out in Calif for the ride back to Texas (some side adventures in AZ and NM) will be sure to take some RuGlide, the slime pump kit, tire irons and C clamp. That will insure I don't get a flat. Anyway, have had only one flat while riding since 1968...recently at about 40mph on my KLR. It was too easy, as it de-beaded its' own self.
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