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Old 08-01-2006, 11:48 AM   #1
winterhk OP
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DL1000 Valve Adjustment - How long is the procedure?

Greetings. Calling all members of the Collective:

If you have had your valves inspected or adjusted by a shop, please post the length of labor they charged you. I'd like to be informed and all assimilated should be as well.

I hope this does not displease the Mother... Thanks!

















Oh and what's up with the crappy new FAQ? Was the Wiki completely lost or something? I don't read the "other" forums enough to know...
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Old 08-01-2006, 01:46 PM   #2
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Just got my 14000 mile service done. Included checking the valves. All within specs. Three hours of labor.
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Old 08-01-2006, 01:49 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AKTroy
Just got my 14000 mile service done. Included checking the valves. All within specs. Three hours of labor.
Thanks What else does the 14k service entail?
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Old 08-01-2006, 04:28 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AKTroy
Just got my 14000 mile service done. Included checking the valves. All within specs. Three hours of labor.
Nice.

Not to hijack to bad here but it would be interesting to hear if you found the valves in or out of spec an by how much the first time you checked.

I'm at just over 7K miles and am debating if I should have a peek at the valves just to see. I know Suzuki says 15K but sometimes I go overboard to play it safe. So what has been your real world experience at first check? (and, of course, how long did it take...see, no hijack)
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Old 08-01-2006, 04:42 PM   #5
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I've never heard of anyones valves being out of spec at 15,000, I'll probably just skip it.
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Old 08-01-2006, 05:33 PM   #6
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For those who would like to do it themselves (it's not that tough) here's a writeup by Patrick...

Quote:
Vstrom Valve Adjustment
A few notes on doing the doing the valves and some other service items.
First off, I think I found a good method to removing and re-installing the body work. Dis-assembly:
1. Left and right black plastic side shrouds under tank.
2. Nose piece under headlight. (Note two phillips screws in screened vents)
3. Left and Right fairings
4. Instrument shroud
5. Headlight shroud (windscreen can stay on if desired)

Tank and radiator removal were straightforward. Be very careful with main fuel hose connection. Mark various vent hose connections if desired. To remove mulit- connector plugs from back of radiator shroud, first loosen up rad and let hang, use a skinny pair of needle nose plier and get between connector shroud and squeeze prong and it then should pull out. Stupid design, as Kathrine noted.

My air filter was filthy, loaded with bugs (10,000 miles) I washed it carefully and air dried it in the sun. Used a bit of grease upon reassembly on filter rubber lip to air box junction. (dirt bike style)

The air box and Throttle Bodies are very prone to coming out of the rubber boots if disturbed. I re-set mine and tightned them up. You really need to take care that they are fully seated and NOT crimped and will NOT slip off later on. One of mine was loose and came off easily when I pulled on it.

Removing the cam covers was no problem, if they are stubborn, gently tap them with a wood mallet. The rear cover is a bit trapped by the wire harness. Go slow and carefully work it out of there without damaging gasket.

Following the manuel I carefully lined up the F/T timing mark for the front cylinder and checked cam lobe positions and checked clearances. Use the inspection hole to eyeball the timing marks. Everything was at minimum clearance or a little tight. (See log elsewhere)

Rotated 270 degrees to R/T timing mark for rear cycllinder. Note cam positions in each case here, also be aware the E and I lines on the cam wheels switch 180 degrees with each rotation.. My rear valves were tight also.

Make sure you rotate the engine ONLY FORWARD WHEN YOU TURN IT. This is counterclockwise on the flywheel. No reference to this in manual.

Now Rotate around to the F/T mark again and make sure cams are in the right position with the I and E marks on the cams are in the right position and the lobes are facing the right way. This is all illustrated in manual.

I then removed cams. Cleaned off oil and used white paint to mark E and I lines on cam wheels to make it easier to see alignment for installation. Used magnet to pull out buckets, re-installed different shims. placed cams back in using trial and error to make sure they were in the exact position, that is that the I an E marks were parallel with engine case. All this is well illustrated in manual. When you intially set them in place you will think that the alignment mark is too high, but you find as you snug down the holders everything lines up. The rear cylinder is a little tough here because of the angle.

Tightned down cam holders gradualy and evenly using a diagonal pattern. (IMPORANT) to 10nm torque. Rotated engine. Checked specs. They weren't quite right, but close. I pulled the cams out again and swapped shims, re-installed shims. All good this time.

To do the REAR cyl. you have to rotate ONE revolution around to the F/T timing mark. Check cam lobe positione and E and I marks to ensure you are set up right for the REAR cylinder.

This is not the position to check clearance but rather this is the position where the E and I lines on the cams will line up and ensure proper valve timing, so this is the position you must have when you remove and re-install the cams for the REAR cylinder.

Did the same thing on the rear and with shim swapping, got everything in about the middle of the range or slightly loose. Intakes : .17mm, .18mm Exhaust: ,25mm , 26mm

I then rotated the engine around a couple revolutions and then back to the F/T position to check clearance on the front cyclinder, once again making sure the E and I lines were on the correct side, and that the cam lobes are in the correct position. re-measured clearances, all good. Then went 360 degrees to R/T position once again and rechecked the rear clearances. Perfect.

I coated all cam and shims with moly lube and filled journals with oil before reassembly. I re-used rubber gaskets and coated cam journals with a bit of silicone high temp gasket goo.

Played around with the ACR (located on each exhaust cam) but never found them to interfere with any measurements.

Anyway, my bike fired up instantly and runs great. No noise from valve gear. I also put in new plugs, changed brake fluid front and rear, fresh coolant, cleaned air cleaner, set TBS and checked TPS (it was fine). Throttle bodies were off about three inches on my Motion Pro mercury gauges. I have yet to do a full shakedown run, maybe tommorrow, but in a few laps around the neighborhood I can say all seems good.
By Patrick Moriarity


Above from here…
http://vstrom.info/cgi-bin/moin.cgi/Ok,_I've_read_the_manual,_can_you_help_me_understa nd_the_procedure%3f
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Old 08-01-2006, 05:42 PM   #7
m0t0-ryder
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Here's an assortment of Valve adjustment tricks and tips.

Any tricks or tips or gotchas I should know about while adjusting the valves?

Quote:
I found there were large chunks of loose gasket crud floating around in there. I picked it out as best I could, but it's worrisome. Some of the pieces were an inch long, and close to a quarter inch thick at the widest point!

The pictures in the manual are wrong, they show the dowel pins on the outside bolts on the cam journals, and mine were on the inside.

The manual says to put the numbers on the shims facing into the tappets, and all but one of mine were facing the other way as it came from the factory.
Katherine

Quote:
I just did mine. The cylinder head gaskets are rubber. I used the same ones over again. Didn't even see the need for a permatex seal or equivalent. Manual is very good on lining up gear sprockets for cam reinstallation
Tom Hanaway

Quote:
I followed the instructions carefully as this was my first shim&bucket/OHC valve adjustment & ultimately succeeded.

One thing I failed to do on buttoning up was reconnect the camshaft position sensor. That led to much worry, another disassembly to check everything & finally find my F-up. Sure hope I'm the only one dumb enough to make that mistake!

I'd lay my hands on some (all in mm) 2.60, 2.65, 2.85 & 2.90 shims before opening it up unless you have a good source for them close by. (I needed three 2.65 & one 2.60 for the intakes and three 2.85 and one 2.90 for the exhausts. kentailes needed two 2.65, one 2.85 and one 2.90. Don't know what shims others needed but that would be good info to log to the list or database.)

While doing the valve adjust isn't rocket science, there is plenty of potential to F-up. (A valve to piston crash can just ruin you're whole day!) So one needs to be real careful writing up a procedure. Doing the job would be easier than writing it up properly IMHO. Following the service manual works but requires a careful read thru before hand and is a PITA.
Russ
Quote:
You shouldn't need to replace the gasket until maybe your third or forth adjust, going by my experience with previous bikes, and my leak-free results from my own adjustment a few months back. Just exercise caution when removing the valve cover so you don't snap it, finesse and a bit of patience is all you need. For reassembly, I recommend Permatex Blue silicone gasket sealer. This is a lot less "gummy" than other compounds, works well, and comes off easily for future procedures.

One item NOT mentioned in the manual: you MUST disable the ACR on the exhaust cams to be able to properly set those valves. I used just a bit of popsicle stick to hold the weight mechanism in the "out" position. Just remember to remove before closing up.
Peter Lindquist
Quote:
The ACR (automatic compression release) mechanism *can* prevent you from accurate data. I'll try to explain, as the manual had nothing on this. I have a KLX300, which uses the same mechanism, thus my familiarity.

At ONE valve position on each exhaust cam you will see a weight and spring arrangement. Attached to this, you'll note a half-round dowel. When you hit the starter, the cam weights are not developing any centripedal force to speak of, so the dowel stays with it's rounded face outward. This surface juts far enough to JUST activate the one exhaust valve. Thus the cylinder does not develop compression, and the starter motor has an easier job spinning the motor up. Now as soon as the engine fires, the increasing RPM cause the weights to move outward. This in turn rotates the dowel pin such that now the FLAT side is now facing outward, thus it no longer makes contact with the follower.

Thus the reason to manipulate the weight, so that the ACR dowel pin cannot make contact and throw off your measurement. I hope this will help you to visualize what's happening in there.
Peter Lindquist
Quote:
I did my first shim under bucket adjustment last week (at about 10k miles), and by following the manual all went reasonably well. By the way, it would be incredibly foolhardy to even consider this job without the shop manual.

I guess if I were to expand on the manual, the things I would suggest would be to start by pulling ALL of the plastic off first - it only takes a couple of minutes longer than just removing the side cowlings alone and it definitely gives you more elbow room.

Second, to unhook the four wire harness plugs that are connected to the back of the radiator shroud, you need to take a pliars & squeeze the connector where it pokes through the shroud (on the fan side, not the engine side). When you squeeze the little pimple that sticks through the entire connector will easily pop off the shroud. This isn't explained anywhere and took me a while to figure it out. Then, bungee all four of the connectors/wires well up out of the way.

Third, have a bucket handy to put the radiator into after you remove it. Even though most of the coolant is drained earlier in the process, it'll steel dribble coolant out and get all over everything. Just stick the whole radiator in a bucket and don't worry about it.

From this point, pulling the valve covers is straightforward. Don't forget to pull the spark plugs before rotating the engine - it is much easier with them out, even if you don't plan on replacing them. Just follow the manual from this point on with respect to aligning the cams and the crankshaft. You don't need to mark the cams - the alignment marks on the cams should be perfectly horizontal to the top of the head when you pull them out - so you just put them back in the same way. As I mentioned in an earlier post, I elected to do one cylinder at time with respect to pulling the cams out. This way you can put them right back in without worrying about the hard to see alignment mark on the main cam gear (the one driven by chain off the crankshaft). In a nutshell, I pulled both cams, made a note of which size shims were currently in place, and put the cams back in. Then I rotated the engine and repeated the process for the rear cylinder. At this point I had a list of my pre-adjustment clearances, plus all the shims that corresponded to the measurements. Now you have the info to determine which shims are reusable (on other valves) and how many new ones you will need. I needed seven shims (only one was reusable). I adjusted all the valves to the middle of the range, not the tight side recommended by others on this list. Since the clearances will tighten over time I feel this gives me more time before I'll need to check or adjust the valves again.

Once you've got your new shims, you just repeat the process, but swap out the old & new shims. By the way, I think the manual says that the number on the shim should face downward, but I found the factory installed some face up, some down - either way seems to work fine as the numbers were not rubbed off on the ones that faced upward.

With respect to the valve cover gaskets, the manual says to use new ones. However I reused mine, and did NOT use the recommended sealant on the half-moon pieces. Using this makes the gasket harder to remove in the future and increased the risk of tearing the gasket next time you need to check the valves. (I did not have any leaks afterward, so I guess the sealant really isn't necessary anyway).

My last tip, on the reassembly of everything, is to be very careful when torqueing the valve cover bolts. I used a torque wrench, and one of them STILL stripped out the very soft aluminum threads. The cam cover bolts thread directly into the top clamshells, which are not replaceable without replacing the entire head. Yes, I was bummed BIG TIME. Fortunately, I was able to heli-coil in a replacement thread - 7mm. So, even following torque specs isn't a guarantee of success!

Finally, you will (obviously) need to rebalance the throttle bodies when you're finished. Mine changed quite a bit after the valve adjustment.
All in all, it was a fairly easy job. Since the cams are gear driven rather than chain driven, they come out very easily
Andy
Quote:
From: "Richard
A thought about the stripped threads-
Most Japanese torque figures are for dry threads. Even wet Loc-Tite requires an adjustment. What are the chances that the bolt or more likely the aluminum threads were oily by replacement time?
Quote:
From: kbecker

> I
> adjusted all the valves to the middle of the range, not the tight side
> recommended by others on this list. Since the clearances will tighten
> over time I feel this gives me more time before I'll need to check or
> adjust the valves again.

Valves wear tighter, not looser. The only reason I can see to adjust to the tight side of the spec, is that tighter valves are quieter. Adjusting to the loose side of the spec would make a little more valvetrain noise, but it will also provide better oil flow to the cams and more time before they have to be changed again, so that's what I planned to do.

Just for reference, here are the clearances and shim sizes I found in my bike:
Front Intake: Clearances: 0.09, 0.13 Shims: 2.68, 2.62
Front Exhaust: Clearances: 0.19, 0.19 Shims: 2.82, 2.80
Rear Intake: Clearances: 0.18, 0.18 In spec so I didn't remove the cam to check the shims
Rear Exhaust: Clearances: 0.20, 0.20 Shims: 2.85, 2.85

Just for the reference, the manual says the intakes should be 0.1 to 0.2, and the exhausts should be 0.2 to the 0.3.

Here's something I've become curious about: How come the shims are only sold in sizes that are increments of five, but the bike comes from the factory with shims in sizes like 262, 268, 282?

It seems like if the factory is shipping the bikes with shims at that level of precision, they must have been aiming at something more precise as the starting point for the valve clearances. Which means the bike came with six of its valves set awfully tight to begin with, or they're wearing frighteningly fast.

I'm hoping they just set them tight to begin with. Maybe they do it on purpose so the bikes will have the quietest possible valve train when they are new. After all, since the average American only rides 3000 miles a year, no one will ever notice their valves are way too tight until the bikes are way out of warranty.

> In either case, best of luck finding the shims you need. The first
> three dealers I went to scored me only 2 of the 7 I needed. I ordered
> five (4x270 and 1x285). The 285 came in after a couple of days, but
> the 270's were backordered from Suzuki with no delivery date
> available. So I got on the phone calling dealers in an expanding
> radius. Finally found one 35 miles away that had them.

This morning I visited a dealer that had most of the shims I needed in stock, and gleaned some valuable info from the parts guy. He took the Suzuki shim from the box, measured the diameter with a caliper, and determined it is 9.5mm. Then he whipped out a giant catalog, (Parts Unlimited, maybe?) and flipped to a page where aftermarket shims were listed. There were 9.5mm aftermarket shims listed in the catalog. The price was $4.99 per shim.
I did not know there were aftermarket shims available, but you would think that the various parts guys I talked to at all those shops would have known it. Why didn't any of them offer this solution?

Anyway, I would think it would be possible for any shop to simply order the aftermarket shims we need, instead of making us wait for the unobtainium Suzuki shims.
Katherine
Quote:
I found the 9.5mm shims are fairly common, some Honda's use them too, (shim under bucket, older ones). Most dealerships will allow you to "borrow" a bunch a shims and return the ones you don't use. This is what I did, I took home about a dozen and bought only six. (I was able to use two of my original shims) I reshimed ALL eight valves. If Ron Ayers are selling shims for $3.75, then thats the ticket. One dealer charged $6.24, another $7.99 per shim!!!
Patrick
Quote:
From: "Tom
I went to my dealer with the shims I needed. Skip going to parts and go right to service. Ask a mechanic and they'll bring out a box of sorted shims. Actually, they weren't sorted very well. Also, they didn't have several of the most common shims for the vstrom. Makes you wonder about bringing your bike in for service, then having it sit there for a week while they get around to ordering your part. Had to go to three different dealers to finally get every shim I needed. But ALL of them were perfectly willing to swap at no charge.

Another suggestion-bring a digital micrometer with you (can get a great one from harbor freight for less than $20-I was sceptical at first but they are incredibly accurate). Lots of shims at the dealer's had the size #'s worn off. A micrometer will make sure you get the right size. Actually, I even measure the ones that had sizes on them. Sometimes there's a variance between what it says and what it is.
Quote:
I didn't bother with lubing the camshaft with Moly. In my opinion it isn't necessary when just doing a valve adjustment (vs. and entire engine teardown). Bear in mind that the valve adjustment/cam removal is the very last section of the service manual, and presupposes that all the preceding steps were followed, which is essentially a full engine teardown. Likewises, for a valve adjustment the "pockets" referred to that are supposed to be filled with oil already have oil in them because the engine wasn't disassembled. Therefore you don't have the dry start-up issue that would necessitate the moly lube on the cams. On the other hand, it certainly does no harm that I can see. I just rubbed a little engine oil on the lobes and the journals before I sealed everything up.
Andy
Quote:
when the manual says the little marks on the cam gear will line up exactly parallel with the edge of the cylinder head, they mean _exactly_. i installed 3 cams out of 4 incorrectly (off by a tooth) at one point, because they looked lined up before i tightened them down, and looked "close enough, that must be what they meant" when i checked them after torquing. this error was introduced because of the split-tooth design of the cam gears, which has the affect that they don't really seat properly before the covers are tightened into place. be sure and check the mark alignment _after_ tightening.
Quote:
be VERY CAREFUL not to drop a shim anywhere other than into the little pocket on top of the valve stem. a shim _will_ fit into the deep oil galleys alongside the cams, i'm sorry to report. i was lucky, and was able to retrieve it using a telescoping magnetic pickup device, but i wouldn't be sure that would always work.
last edited 2005-03-21 17:01:56 by DanObrien
All the above from here…
http://vstrom.info/cgi-bin/moin.cgi/..._the_valves%3f


And this one…

Quote:
What about adjusting the valves, anyone try it?
Here's what I found:

INTAKES
All 4 measured 4 mil go, 5 mil no go. I estimated 4.5 mils or 0.11mm. JUST in the 0.10 to 0.20 spec.
• 3 had 2.70 shims & 1 had a 2.65 shim.
I'm going to target these to 0.16mm and thus got three 2.65 & one 2.60 shims. (I know I could leave them alone, but I don't like tight valves.)

EXHAUSTS
Two measured 6.5 mil or 0.17mm (out of 0.20 to 0.30 mm spec); another was
• 7.5 mils or 0.19 mm just out of spec. The last was 9 mils or 0.23 mm, in spec.
• All had 2.95 mm shims. I'm going to put these loose, at about 0.28 mm, so I got three 2.85 and one
2.90 shims.
And Kent's measurements at 15K were: (I've pasted in part of his messages in case y'all didn't save his emails. Hope you don't mind Kent.)
• Front intake: .07 and .12
Rear intake: .10 and .07
• Front Exhaust: .18 and .18
Rear Exhaust: .20 and .25
He ended up needing two @ 2.65, one at 2.85 and one @ 2.90.
Based on this tiny data set, it looks like getting some 2.60, 2.65, 2.85 & 2.90 shims in hand before tackling the job could save some time, though of course YMMV.
From the manual, the suzuki part numbers for the shims are 12892-41C00-XXX where XXX=3Dsize, e.g. for 2.65 XXX=3D265. But from communications with Kent, these 10mm diameter shims, that look like pills, are fairly common so you may be able to get them at some m/c shops. I had a hard time finding them here in N NJstate (at 3 suzuki & 2 honda dealers, unless I wanted to wait a week!). Guess NJ is a bike buy, ride a bit, and sell quick state. I finally got them at Touch of Class BMW/Suzuki in Phillipsburg NJ. Wish I'd bought my bike there, I had forgotten they were also a Suzuki dealer, though had dealt with them over the years with my beemers. Good people. They actually stock things that are needed for routine maintenance. Ought to be a good test for assessing your dealer.
Later Russ Butler N NJ 88&89 BMW R100GS's 02 DL1000 #1034
The above from here…

http://vstrom.info/cgi-bin/moin.cgi/...yone_try_it%3f
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Old 08-01-2006, 05:51 PM   #8
Wrycque
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Comment

I've done my bike a few times now. What I have noticed it that the first time I did it I had to replace several shims. I set the valves at the loose side of the tolerance. The second time I did it, I did not need any shims but the valves werre not getting tighter as they did the first time. The third time I did the job, I needed one shim, but the valves were getting looser, not tighter.

I am of the opinion that the DL1000 engine runs a little better when the valves are set to the tight side of the tolerance - it pops/farts less.
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Old 08-01-2006, 08:17 PM   #9
cap
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Desert Dave
Not to hijack to bad here but it would be interesting to hear if you found the valves in or out of spec an by how much the first time you checked.
I had my DL1000K5 checked at 7000 miles. One of the exhaust valves was set too tight. The other valves were within spec.

They changed the oil, filter, coolant, air filter, and swapped the original tires off for Anakees. It took about 24 hours. I dropped it off one morning, and picked it up the next. Cost about $400, not including the cost of the tires which I provided.

BTW, I will never buy Anakees again. They suck in mud, and the rear wore completely bald in about 6000 miles.

Now THAT is a hijack!
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Old 08-03-2006, 01:39 PM   #10
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How far without it?

I'm just wondering... how far can I go without doing any valve adjustment?
Besides the manual suggestion, my Vee is now 23k and still running as good as new. So far I've done only filter/spark plug and oil/filter change (not counting tires, one set of Anakees for each 6K)
I've been always skeptical about manuals references. I really think they are always trying to push the terrified rider (and his hard earned money) back to the dealer on a regular (and profitable) basis.
- Silly me, risking to ruin my engine, right?
Maybe so, what you guys think about that?
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Old 08-03-2006, 01:45 PM   #11
winterhk OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bycharlie
I'm just wondering... how far can I go without doing any valve adjustment?
Besides the manual suggestion, my Vee is now 23k and still running as good as new. So far I've done only filter/spark plug and oil/filter change (not counting tires, one set of Anakees for each 6K)
I've been always skeptical about manuals references. I really think they are always trying to push the terrified rider (and his hard earned money) back to the dealer on a regular (and profitable) basis.
- Silly me, risking to ruin my engine, right?
Maybe so, what you guys think about that?
I'm in the same boat, 23k and no adjustment. I asked the dealer (a friend) the other day while I was there and he told me that I'd likely still be in spec. I'm still nervous though.

On a side note, I did my TBS yesterday and they were less than 2 inches off on the homemade ATF manometer! I was expecting something different since I'd not done it in the 7k miles I've owned this bike.
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Old 08-03-2006, 03:00 PM   #12
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Wicked

Quote:
Originally Posted by winterhk
I'm in the same boat, 23k and no adjustment. I asked the dealer (a friend) the other day while I was there and he told me that I'd likely still be in spec. I'm still nervous though.

On a side note, I did my TBS yesterday and they were less than 2 inches off on the homemade ATF manometer! I was expecting something different since I'd not done it in the 7k miles I've owned this bike.

7.5"=< 2"....hmmmmm.....maybe less than two inches after a twiddling.

Go let Jimmy inspect those valves. Your bike is running fine, but my bet goes to one or two exhaust valves being TOO tight.

I'll loan you the two hundred bucks......at eleben percent interest....compounded bi-weekly.

You're in it for the long haul??
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Old 08-03-2006, 03:27 PM   #13
winterhk OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xrmattaz
7.5"=< 2"....hmmmmm.....maybe less than two inches after a twiddling.
It was less than 2", then some twiddling brought it to 7" and now back to *almost* even. Are you high?
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Old 08-03-2006, 03:48 PM   #14
xrmattaz
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Eh?

Quote:
Originally Posted by winterhk
It was less than 2", then some twiddling brought it to 7" and now back to *almost* even. Are you high?

Did you check 'em again? Those injectors are too finicky for me, and I'm married.

I've been wrenching on the Airhead all day today, she's running good.
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Old 08-04-2006, 11:41 AM   #15
winterhk OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xrmattaz
Did you check 'em again? Those injectors are too finicky for me, and I'm married.

I've been wrenching on the Airhead all day today, she's running good.
Never checked again, she rides smoothly though...
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