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Old 10-10-2014, 02:34 PM   #1
Dkizerian OP
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Joined: Dec 2013
Location: Tooele, Utah
Oddometer: 109
Break-in oil for new rings?

I hate to ask an oil question here, but oh well...

What is recommended for Oil to break in new rings? How long should that oil stay in the bike before changing out?

Also, can anyone recommend a good article, or post about oils to use through the whole bike? I've searched, but just find varying opinions and arguments.

Thanks
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Old 10-10-2014, 03:26 PM   #2
Beemeup
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Oh boy, an oil thread! All I know is that I followed the official procedure when I bought the bike. They put in 20/50 presumably and I brought it in for the 600 mile service for a fresh batch.
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Old 10-10-2014, 04:23 PM   #3
One Less Harley
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When installing new rings in re-coated barrels I just coated cylinders, pistons and rings with an engine bearing lube and I wasn't to worried about changing the oil soon, rings aren't going to put that much into the oil. Just start out with new oil and filter and change at 3,000 miles. IMHO

More importantly is to vary engine rpms for the first 500-1000 miles to allow proper lubrication of rings. Work the engine but not overly aggressive on the RPMS labor the engine like going up hills then back off throttle to supply more oil to the rings doing this periodically during the 1st hours of use. That's just what I try to do.
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One Less Harley screwed with this post 10-10-2014 at 04:29 PM
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Old 10-10-2014, 05:02 PM   #4
disston
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I started with 10-40 oil after new rings. I also started the engine with dry cylinders, no oil on the pistons or rings, just a smear of oil on the bottom of the piston skirt on the top edge. Rev engine immediately to 4K or so. Hold at about 3k for 4 minutes. Then fast idle for 10 minutes. Change the filter and oil to what you are going to use, 20-50 or fresh 10-40. This dry starting process is supposed to help seat the rings fast.

There may be other variations of the dry starting process. I think I got the general idea.

I especially think it important to change the oil after 20 minutes when dealing with fresh engine parts and freshly honed cylinders.

Edit; You are going to get different answers depending on the age, year, of this bike. Is it iron cylinders? Nikasil? New pistons? Rebuilt heads?

My bike is 40 years old with iron cylinders. Need to know what you have. I'm sure the Nikasil guys will swoon at the dry process, won't they?
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disston screwed with this post 10-10-2014 at 05:11 PM
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Old 10-10-2014, 05:49 PM   #5
Dkizerian OP
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Sorry, bike is an 84 R100RT, so Nikasil, correct?
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Old 10-10-2014, 06:14 PM   #6
windypoint
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Not sure how well this applies. I have broken in many air cooled airplane engines which are remarkably similar to BMW airheads and all the old school really good aircraft mechanics recommend mineral oil for break in for the first 50 hours to seat the rings. Phillips Type M straight or multigrade has served me well. The advice I have been given is run it in hard for the first twenty five hours until oil consumption stabilizes and then go to fifty hours and switch to your oil of preference.
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Old 10-10-2014, 06:41 PM   #7
CafeDude
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Quote:
Originally Posted by disston View Post
I started with 10-40 oil after new rings. I also started the engine with dry cylinders, no oil on the pistons or rings, just a smear of oil on the bottom of the piston skirt on the top edge. Rev engine immediately to 4K or so. Hold at about 3k for 4 minutes. Then fast idle for 10 minutes. Change the filter and oil to what you are going to use, 20-50 or fresh 10-40. This dry starting process is supposed to help seat the rings fast.

There may be other variations of the dry starting process. I think I got the general idea.

I especially think it important to change the oil after 20 minutes when dealing with fresh engine parts and freshly honed cylinders.

Edit; You are going to get different answers depending on the age, year, of this bike. Is it iron cylinders? Nikasil? New pistons? Rebuilt heads?

My bike is 40 years old with iron cylinders. Need to know what you have. I'm sure the Nikasil guys will swoon at the dry process, won't they?
^that's how my engine rebuilder used to do them.
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Old 10-10-2014, 07:46 PM   #8
Beemerguru
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Quote:
Originally Posted by disston View Post
I started with 10-40 oil after new rings. I also started the engine with dry cylinders, no oil on the pistons or rings, just a smear of oil on the bottom of the piston skirt on the top edge. Rev engine immediately to 4K or so. Hold at about 3k for 4 minutes. Then fast idle for 10 minutes. Change the filter and oil to what you are going to use, 20-50 or fresh 10-40. This dry starting process is supposed to help seat the rings fast.

There may be other variations of the dry starting process. I think I got the general idea.

I especially think it important to change the oil after 20 minutes when dealing with fresh engine parts and freshly honed cylinders.

Edit; You are going to get different answers depending on the age, year, of this bike. Is it iron cylinders? Nikasil? New pistons? Rebuilt heads?

My bike is 40 years old with iron cylinders. Need to know what you have. I'm sure the Nikasil guys will swoon at the dry process, won't they?
\\

+1

Old moonshine builder's method from way back when !

Dry with a smear on the skirts..I use 30wt dino for the first 15 minutes....immediate 3-5K rpm...vary the speed.

Run for about 3-4 minutes...drain and new filter..dino just to be sure..rings will seat about 90% of the time..

Retorque, set valves and go for a ride. check oil every 500 miles...switch to synthetic if oil consumption stays at a pint or less for 1500 miles...or stay with dino if you want.
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Old 10-10-2014, 09:29 PM   #9
Wirespokes
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Assemble dry, a drop on the skirts.

Have your gear on and ready to go the instant the engine starts.

Hit the road soon as it's running. Head for the hills Load the engine, compression brake, and don't run it much over 4K. Go for a 30 mile ride.

The reason for loading it is compression pressure forces the rings against the cylinder. That's what breaks in the rings.

The reason for starting up dry is because oil lubricates and doesn't help the rings scuff into the cylinder. Don't worry about everything running dry because buckets of oil will fly around in there almost right away.

Don't use any special oil for break in - 30 wt dyno or 10-40. Change after the 30 mile ride. Who knows how much grit will be generated? Oil's cheap - especially cheap oil. Change it.
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Old 10-11-2014, 03:00 AM   #10
FrankR80GS
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Quote:
Originally Posted by One Less Harley View Post
... I just coated cylinders, pistons and rings with an engine bearing lube and I wasn't to worried ...
If the bearing lube was grease, I wouldn't recommend this to others. Bearing grease consists of oil and soap. When the oil is washed away, which happens very quickly, the soap may clogg the oil channels in the circuit. Otherwise you are right, new piston rings don't need special treatment. Just put on some engine oil (20W50 is recommended) and you are done.
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Old 10-11-2014, 06:19 AM   #11
jackd
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Quote:
Originally Posted by windypoint View Post
Not sure how well this applies. I have broken in many air cooled airplane engines which are remarkably similar to BMW airheads and all the old school really good aircraft mechanics recommend mineral oil for break in for the first 50 hours to seat the rings. Phillips Type M straight or multigrade has served me well. The advice I have been given is run it in hard for the first twenty five hours until oil consumption stabilizes and then go to fifty hours and switch to your oil of preference.
I'm going back thirty years to my recip days of aviation maintenance here. I worked for a major float plane operator here on the west coast and changing jugs was a regular event due to cracks, low compression, etc. New engines were broken in with straight mineral oil for the required 50 flight hours. We never swapped back to the mineral oil to break in a fresh jug installation during the life of an engine. We just kept running it with the standard 'AD' oil, and I don't don't recall any issues of rings not seating in.

When it came to changing the rings on my airhead, I approached it the same way. I kept running the standard Castrol motorcycle oil, that I was using at the time and I encountered no problems seating the rings. I probably never even changed the oil out after a short service interval either but ran if for the standard 2500 miles that I always do. I have faith in oil filters to do their job. That comes from working now working on gas turbines.
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Old 10-11-2014, 08:05 AM   #12
One Less Harley
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FrankR80GS View Post
If the bearing lube was grease, I wouldn't recommend this to others. Bearing grease consists of oil and soap. When the oil is washed away, which happens very quickly, the soap may clogg the oil channels in the circuit. Otherwise you are right, new piston rings don't need special treatment. Just put on some engine oil (20W50 is recommended) and you are done.

never grease...engine assembly lube...
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Old 10-12-2014, 06:44 AM   #13
TomAZ1983
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I used the moto man break in. Dino oil only until 1500 miles. Oil changes @ 20, 100, 500, 1000, 1500 switch to synthetic. Kinda controversial but it's always worked for me.


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Old 10-12-2014, 09:02 AM   #14
silverhead
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I re-ringed my R90 with Saab car rings last month.. I've just been riding it on Napa 20w50 oil for about 200 miles now. There's too much info on the internetz that negates itself so I just ride normally as opposed to 'hard.' I don't think I've been up over 6k RPM but I am riding like I normally would around town.

In my case I honed 59k mile jugs so the standard sized rings barely met ring gap spec anyway. I'm just delaying the inevitable for the next few years, but I've got 135psi in each cylinder at the moment and she's running well.
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