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Old 04-16-2013, 05:27 AM   #796
daveoneshot
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This is becoming interesting reading. Anybody remember those pictures of Japanese factory workers doing calisthenics and Tai Chi movements before going to work in their factories ??
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Old 04-16-2013, 10:42 PM   #797
motu
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And compare that to the British workers having a greasy fry up breakfast before going to work ?
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Old 04-18-2013, 08:59 AM   #798
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The Japanese had the big advantage of starting from ground zero, both in terms of equipment and management.
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Old 04-18-2013, 10:09 AM   #799
Plaka
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chasbmw View Post
The Japanese had the big advantage of starting from ground zero, both in terms of equipment and management.
I would differ on that. Things were in shambles after the war but the attitude was definitely high production mode. Everyone was in that mindset.

I remember when made in japan meant you were getting crap, much like made in China means today. But the Japenese knew it and didn't like it. They set their sights on being an industrial power with first class manufacturing...and they did it. No one turns up their nose at made in Japan today. They had the engineering, during the war their aircraft were the best in the world. And Mitsubishi never slowed down. Canon, Olympus and Nikon were giving Leitz, Zeiss and Wild a run for their money in industrial and consumer optics. Mitutoyo is easily the equal of Anthol Starret in measuring equipment (and cheaper) and then there is their whole electronics industry. What did the US make compared to what Matsushita was turning out?
But what I really note, from modern times, is what happened when Toyota completely blew it. Took awhile but the chairman was on national TV taking personal responsibility (and expressing person shame) over the incident. US executives don't think that way...at all.
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Old 04-18-2013, 11:49 AM   #800
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chasbmw View Post
The Japanese had the big advantage of starting from ground zero, both in terms of equipment and management.
That's not entirely correct. Japanese industry postwar was very limited in the resource allocation allowances and were further challenged by being essentially overseen by American authorities.

Thankfully the collusion of cultures and ideas led to amazing advances in industrial management. Namely the Japanese industry became , over a few decades, the leading force in lean conceptualization. Using the PDCA technique of Arthur Deming and the kaizen/yoketan principles of daily improvement, corrolary with Shingo's SMED and poke-yoke concepts, the Japanese industry exploded in quality amazingly rapidly in almost every category. This is why early Japanese products were little more than cheap, unreliable knock offs, and then fifteen years later all of a sudden there's the CB750.
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Old 04-20-2013, 06:58 AM   #801
RagerToo
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rebuilding /7 left side switches

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Originally Posted by Plaka View Post
Lesson learned---do the turn signal switch first.

(thread) http://www.advrider.com/forums/showp...&postcount=779
Shweet Plaka. I want to pull mine off the bars, anyway, to repair someone's attempt at no running headlight. D'oh. I'm also going to have to invest in one of those lighted knitting magnifying lights for my buddy's garage.

So far I've drilled the shiftless locking fuel cap to remove it and repaired the rear brake level sensor. Think there's any interest in pics?
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Old 04-21-2013, 09:46 AM   #802
Kai Ju
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Making Springs

Plaka,

If you have even some of the spring left you can make a replica.
I used to have to make springs for pocket watch lids when I was making a living as a Jeweler.
You can buy spring wire, all you need is the diameter of the wire and the length.
To make your own spring get the correct wire size and find a piece of round stock that is the same OD as the springs ID.
Cross drill a hole for the spring wire and insert the wire.
Now wrap the wire around the rod keep it tight by holding it tight against a piece of hardwood while spinning it.
I used my Flexshaft to spin it but a dremel or drill will work.
Make the spring longer than you need it to be, i.e. more windings, stretch it to match the original and cut it off.

(just found this site while looking for a wire source: http://home.earthlink.net/~bazillion/matls.html )
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Old 04-21-2013, 11:22 AM   #803
Plaka
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kai Ju View Post
Plaka,

If you have even some of the spring left you can make a replica.
I used to have to make springs for pocket watch lids when I was making a living as a Jeweler.
You can buy spring wire, all you need is the diameter of the wire and the length.
To make your own spring get the correct wire size and find a piece of round stock that is the same OD as the springs ID.
Cross drill a hole for the spring wire and insert the wire.
Now wrap the wire around the rod keep it tight by holding it tight against a piece of hardwood while spinning it.
I used my Flexshaft to spin it but a dremel or drill will work.
Make the spring longer than you need it to be, i.e. more windings, stretch it to match the original and cut it off.

(just found this site while looking for a wire source: http://home.earthlink.net/~bazillion/matls.html )
I had an interesting scar on one arm for several years. It was a series of very fine, closely spaced parrallel lines running across the arm and extending towards the wrist.

I was winding a spring on a lathe. It was maybe 3/4" diameter and fairly stiff wire. I'd made an undersized mandrel to account for the spring relaxing after the wind. I had the lathe turning with my mandrel in place and was feeding the wire off a hand held spool. The length got right so I shut off the lathe and with the other hand I cut the wire leaving a long tail which was later to be fashioned into a hook. Dumb move. As the spring relaxed the wire whipped around a dozen times in an instant, cutting my arm every turn. I was plenty pissed off.



The spring I need is very small, very fine wire. It's also oversquare, short and fat. I'm going to try punching a disk out of the wall of some silicone tubing with a belt punch. If I get the right size it should work, and won't rust.

Plaka screwed with this post 04-21-2013 at 11:29 AM
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Old 04-21-2013, 01:30 PM   #804
Kai Ju
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Let me know how it works out, I've got a /7 light switch that needs help.
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Old 04-22-2013, 05:57 AM   #805
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This belongs here:


Quote:
Originally Posted by craydds View Post
Here's a little trick that I do - I cut the fuel line with a sharp chisel and a hammer with one quick WHACK for a real clean cut, doesn't fray the fabric. Then I drip a tiny bit of super-glue around the freshly cut fabric ends and they never fray for a long, long time:
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Old 06-04-2013, 07:38 PM   #806
darklight79
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chasbmw View Post
The Japanese had the big advantage of starting from ground zero, both in terms of equipment and management.
love the pun " working from ground zero " hmmm who funded the rebuild?
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Old 06-15-2013, 04:43 PM   #807
TINK
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Neutral Switch Sub Harness

The neutral switch connectors are a real PITA to plug in once the transmission is in place. I managed to get the connectors back onto the neutral switch the first time I had the trans out during restoration...

but no such luck today. I had the trans in and struggled to get the connectors onto the neutral switch...

wouldn't ya know it, S N A P the connector breaks off from the switch.

Pull the trans back out, install new $35 neutral switch, build sub-harness so I can plug the wires onto the switch while it's still on the bench, modify the BMW harness to fit the new sub-harness, re-install trans.

Bummer!


New sub-harness


Modified BMW harness


Trans install, NO PROBLEM now with neutral switch sub-harness


Done!


TINK
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Old 06-15-2013, 04:49 PM   #808
TINK
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Turn Signal Screw Subtitue

So, you've lost a turn signal lens screw and you local BMW dealer tells you they are no longer available...

You start with the local hardware store, move up to the specialty hardware suppliers (Hillco for example), but no joy on a M3.5 "fine thread" x 25mm machine screw.

Next you turn to the web, and you find several sources but they want $3 / screw + shipping, Sheesh Boo Boo.

Put on your thinking caps... who might have a M3.5 fine x 25 machine screw!?

Dubro to the rescue! Yes, Dubro part #2274 is what the Dr. ordered. You get four (4) screws for under $2.00 (you do the math ;-)

Sure, purists won't like the fact that the Dubro screw is an Alan head and black oxide, too bad, go ahead and spend your money on those $3 + shipping screws and have a nice day.





Oh, ya, and if you're looking for a substitute for the BMW washer for the turn signal lens screw, this Honda part fit's perfectly.


TINK
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Old 06-15-2013, 05:07 PM   #809
disston
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That's good stuff TINK. Think I'll borrow all of those ideas.
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Old 06-15-2013, 10:00 PM   #810
Plaka
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TINK View Post
So, you've lost a turn signal lens screw and you local BMW dealer tells you they are no longer available...

You start with the local hardware store, move up to the specialty hardware suppliers (Hillco for example), but no joy on a M3.5 "fine thread" x 25mm machine screw.

Next you turn to the web, and you find several sources but they want $3 / screw + shipping, Sheesh Boo Boo.

Put on your thinking caps... who might have a M3.5 fine x 25 machine screw!?

Dubro to the rescue! Yes, Dubro part #2274 is what the Dr. ordered. You get four (4) screws for under $2.00 (you do the math ;-)

Sure, purists won't like the fact that the Dubro screw is an Alan head and black oxide, too bad, go ahead and spend your money on those $3 + shipping screws and have a nice day.





Oh, ya, and if you're looking for a substitute for the BMW washer for the turn signal lens screw, this Honda part fit's perfectly.


TINK
Or you could convert to M4 x .7 and have your choice of nice stainless screws for cheap.

BTW, I did a thread on rust treatments for screws. That black oxide doesn't last long, and then looks like hell. Baked on Linseed oil over the black oxide looks just as black and seems to be extremely durable. Touch up the oil inside the hole after installation and just let it dry.
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