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Old 08-22-2013, 09:29 PM   #856
ddennis669
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kanakaka View Post
Can someone point me in the direction of good info on this... I'm sure it's been hashed out many times and I've found a few lively discussions about it but just looking for something concrete.

Getting ready to go on a trip and thinking about replacing my unknown mileage wheel bearings before I go.



Thanks!
Claude


A lot of wheel bearing information can be found here:

Snowbum on Bearings

and somewhat clearer instructions on servicing from
Duane Ausherman on Wheel Bearings

Special bonus link to:
Snowbum on Lester wheels

And if you still haven't had enough:
Snowbum's Technical Articles
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Old 08-25-2013, 09:23 AM   #857
Mugwest
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Oilhead HES test box to set Airhead HES Beancans

This occurred to me months ago and i've just now been reminded to post it.

There is a homemade Hall Tester in the ADV Hall of Wisdom. It has simple instructions and a parts list for building a test gadget for R259 Oilheads that have 2 Hall sensors.

I was surprised what with Radio Shack turning into little more than a damn phone store that they actually had every part on hand to build the box.

OK, so the dread word Oilhead has been mentioned and the Airhead JimJonesers are sharpening their pitchforks and mouse buttons. WTF does this have to do with Airheads? i hear.

Easy, gentle Cultists:
The Oilhead Hall Sensor Timing Box can also be used to statically time/set your Hall sensor-equipped Airhead Beancan (those of you who haven't gone Back To The Future with points-in-a-can ).

The Oilhead test box has 2 LEDs to test the Oilhead's 2 Hall sensors. Since the airhead has but one HES, you'll use either of the test box's HES leads. (Yellow or Green if you built the box to spec)

So, do it. Build the H.O.W./Radio Shack test box and then use these connections on the male terminals of your Airhead's Beancan plug:



You then turn the engine so that the S mark is in the timing window. Switch the test box on, loosen the Beancan retaining screws slightly, and twist the entire can. At the very millisecond the LED lights up, stop turning-- timing is set. Tighten the beancan screws and go have a proper Tuscan lunch.

The Oilhead timing/test box essentially duplicates "Ignition timing device BMW No. 12 3 650" seen here in the factory manual:




I suppose if you were clever you could eliminate the 2nd LED circuit in the test box to make it Airhead-only. I built mine to replace my 1100's HES a couple years ago, and just recently realized it would work on the Airhead

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Old 08-25-2013, 04:42 PM   #858
Plaka
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mugwest View Post
This occurred to me months ago and i've just now been reminded to post it.

There is a homemade Hall Tester in the ADV Hall of Wisdom. It has simple instructions and a parts list for building a test gadget for R259 Oilheads that have 2 Hall sensors.

I was surprised what with Radio Shack turning into little more than a damn phone store that they actually had every part on hand to build the box.

OK, so the dread word Oilhead has been mentioned and the Airhead JimJonesers are sharpening their pitchforks and mouse buttons. WTF does this have to do with Airheads? i hear.

Easy, gentle Cultists:
The Oilhead Hall Sensor Timing Box can also be used to statically time/set your Hall sensor-equipped Airhead Beancan (those of you who haven't gone Back To The Future with points-in-a-can ).

The Oilhead test box has 2 LEDs to test the Oilhead's 2 Hall sensors. Since the airhead has but one HES, you'll use either of the test box's HES leads. (Yellow or Green if you built the box to spec)

So, do it. Build the H.O.W./Radio Shack test box and then use these connections on the male terminals of your Airhead's Beancan plug:



You then turn the engine so that the S mark is in the timing window. Switch the test box on, loosen the Beancan retaining screws slightly, and twist the entire can. At the very millisecond the LED lights up, stop turning-- timing is set. Tighten the beancan screws and go have a proper Tuscan lunch.

The Oilhead timing/test box essentially duplicates "Ignition timing device BMW No. 12 3 650" seen here in the factory manual:




I suppose if you were clever you could eliminate the 2nd LED circuit in the test box to make it Airhead-only. I built mine to replace my 1100's HES a couple years ago, and just recently realized it would work on the Airhead

Might be wiser to leave it as is for oilheads---can test two sensors. Handy on tech days if somebody comes slumming with an oilhead. More importantly, it gives you a redundant test box. You have two test circuits. if neither lights up, replace the battery.

Would be worthwhile to know how to test the test box. My understanding is the Hall is simply a switch.

Consider:
" Automotive ignition and fuel injection Commonly used in distributors for ignition timing (and in some types of crank and camshaft position sensors for injection pulse timing, speed sensing, etc.) the Hall effect sensor is used as a direct replacement for the mechanical breaker points used in earlier automotive applications. Its use as an ignition timing device in various distributor types is as follows. A stationary permanent magnet and semiconductor Hall effect chip are mounted next to each other separated by an air gap, forming the Hall effect sensor. A metal rotor consisting of windows and tabs is mounted to a shaft and arranged so that during shaft rotation, the windows and tabs pass through the air gap between the permanent magnet and semiconductor Hall chip. This effectively shields and exposes the Hall chip to the permanent magnet's field respective to whether a tab or window is passing though the Hall sensor. For ignition timing purposes, the metal rotor will have a number of equal-sized tabs and windows matching the number of engine cylinders. This produces a uniform square wave output since the on/off (shielding and exposure) time is equal. This signal is used by the engine computer or ECU to control ignition timing. Many automotive Hall effect sensors have a built-in internal NPN transistor with an open collector and grounded emitter, meaning that rather than a voltage being produced at the Hall sensor signal output wire, the transistor is turned on providing a circuit to ground through the signal output wire."


What this means is the hall sensor is a grounding switch. It activates the test box light (or the ignition) by providing a path to ground when activated.


So to test the test box you would turn it on and touch the sensor lead to the ground lead. Light should come on.


The ignition test is to touch the hall output lead (center pin) on the engine side of the plug, to ground. This should make a spark at the plug. Confirms the hall is a grounding switch.




BTW, doing that test is a pain. You need some sort of probe and have to fiddle it up into the plug while lying on your back on an anthill. I made up a probe out of a stiff piece of music wire. On end is hammered and fileed to the proper "pin" size to fit the plug. The other end has a female spade. All but the spade and plug tip are covered in heatshrink. It is just long enough to tuck into the side ventilation compartment of the timing chain chest. It bows slightly and stays in place. Good length to reach in with (10"?). Right where you need it when you need it. No cobbling up something while the ants invite relatives to the feast.




Methinks that test box needs to run on 12VDC rather than 9. Then you can run it off the bike battery so no dead or leaking 9V battery. Also could be extremely tiny.




Lemme think on that...Have a funny little LED light I made up once to illuminate a gauge...
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Old 08-30-2013, 07:57 AM   #859
crazydrummerdude
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Quote:
Originally Posted by disston View Post
No. They cost you $1.05 per screw for the 8 you need. As you sell screws for $2.00 a set your price will go down till yours are free after 4.2 sets sold. Then you are into making profit. Make sure you report this income to the IRS unless you are going to declare yourself a non-profit.
Just FYI:

I just bought 8 turn signal screws for $2 from Brocktoon's Stainless Steel Airhead Turn Signal Screw Emporium, or BSSATSSE as I call it. Had I purchased them from BMW, it would have cost $24!

I saved money. His cost per screw has gone down. Life is good.
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Old 09-25-2013, 11:59 PM   #860
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One more bit with turn signals

My last fix on the road...

The rear turn signal housings kept falling off and I couldn't seem to get the 5.5, or whatever they are, tight enough. After 3 or 4 times I got a package of #8 machine screws to replace the stock and I haven't dealt with any more hanging by the wire signals since.

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Old 10-01-2013, 02:01 PM   #861
Plaka
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removing the oil filter standpipe on a /5

I like to take the standpipe out when changing oil. It gets wiped down and blown out. Just gets more of the used oil out of the engine. So I've come up with an easy way to do it.

The standpipe is heavy metal and has holes bored crosswise through it for oil flow. Take a small allen key and reach in and get the short end of the key all the way through the top two holes---in one side and out the other. Use the biggest key that will fit. Then reach down the center of the pipe with a flat bladed screwdriver and wedge it between the key and the wall of the pipe. Turn the screw driver with a wrench to twist the pipe and unscrew it. Easy!
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Old 10-01-2013, 04:15 PM   #862
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Plaka View Post
I like to take the standpipe out when changing oil.
Now THAT is anal.

Quote:
The standpipe is heavy metal and has holes bored crosswise through it for oil flow. Take a small allen key and reach in and get the short end of the key all the way through the top two holes---in one side and out the other. Use the biggest key that will fit. Then reach down the center of the pipe with a flat bladed screwdriver and wedge it between the key and the wall of the pipe. Turn the screw driver with a wrench to twist the pipe and unscrew it. Easy!
Not a bad idea. I'll have to see if something similar will work on my /6.
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Old 10-12-2013, 05:23 PM   #863
Gripsteruser
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Preemptively replaced driveshaft on 1988 R100GS with 40k miles.
(Old driveshaft was perfectly fine.)

As found elsewhere in tidbits, new paralever boots are of thicker, stiffer material. Besides being a real bear to put in place, they are too thick for the clamps. I even ordered new clamps hoping they'd been changed to account for the difference but - no.

Had to use cable ties.
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Old 10-12-2013, 08:37 PM   #864
Plaka
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gripsteruser View Post
Preemptively replaced driveshaft on 1988 R100GS with 40k miles.
(Old driveshaft was perfectly fine.)

As found elsewhere in tidbits, new paralever boots are of thicker, stiffer material. Besides being a real bear to put in place, they are too thick for the clamps. I even ordered new clamps hoping they'd been changed to account for the difference but - no.

Had to use cable ties.
Mind burning a cable tie and clipping it off and measuring the exact encircling length? Also the normal clamp width. I may know a metal clamp that will work there.
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Old 10-13-2013, 08:38 AM   #865
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Plaka View Post
Mind burning a cable tie and clipping it off and measuring the exact encircling length? Also the normal clamp width. I may know a metal clamp that will work there.
Actually it would be 3 ties. The front boot used 2 of the same same size, the back boot takes 2 different ones. None could be refit.

I'm off to other projects now. I don't ride water crossings or even in the rain so cable ties will work for me. I'm tired of this project for now.
Thanks for the offer though.
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Old 10-13-2013, 02:54 PM   #866
luxlogs
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Plaka View Post
Mind burning a cable tie and clipping it off and measuring the exact encircling length? Also the normal clamp width. I may know a metal clamp that will work there.
I have a 92 R100GS and don't mind burning a cable tie, just let me know exactly what to measure and how. Don't need the info myself right now but will in the future.

Niel
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Old 10-13-2013, 04:47 PM   #867
Plaka
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Quote:
Originally Posted by luxlogs View Post
I have a 92 R100GS and don't mind burning a cable tie, just let me know exactly what to measure and how. Don't need the info myself right now but will in the future.

Niel
What I need is the width of the clamp and the diameter that has to be clamped. if you clip the tie, just lay it out on the table and measure from one end to the other. Clip well away from the litte lock thing. Need the dimension to the 1/16" if possible. If it looks like the clamp can be wider, note that. Narrower generally cuts into the rubber.

Thanks!
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Old 10-14-2013, 08:51 PM   #868
Wirespokes
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I've seen stainless zip ties at HF and thought they'd work.
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Old 10-14-2013, 09:01 PM   #869
Kai Ju
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wirespokes View Post
I've seen stainless zip ties at HF and thought they'd work.
They might just work in this application because you can compress the rubber to tighten the clamp. They will not work in an application where you have to rely on "stretching" the zip tie. I tried.
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Old 10-15-2013, 07:41 AM   #870
mark1305
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kai Ju View Post
They might just work in this application because you can compress the rubber to tighten the clamp. They will not work in an application where you have to rely on "stretching" the zip tie. I tried.
+1 The SS ties have a tiny latch mechanism that lets a couple of mm slide back out as it locks down.
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