ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Bikes > Thumpers
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 06-09-2010, 09:57 PM   #16
GetYourOwn
Studly Adventurer
 
Joined: Nov 2005
Location: Sanford NC
Oddometer: 792
Just read some other threads it looks like I just switch the spacer from the dampening rod back to the top of the forks.
GetYourOwn is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-10-2010, 04:39 AM   #17
basketcase
lifelong reject fixer
 
basketcase's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2004
Location: Fading...
Oddometer: 1,412
Quote:
Originally Posted by GetYourOwn
Just read some other threads it looks like I just switch the spacer from the dampening rod back to the top of the forks.
As I understand it that is the basic chore. It's just a very involved switch due to the need to disassemble the front end and remove the forks.

Buried someplace in a thread entitled "Distechs DR650 Rebuild" or something like that there is a description of what bolts to buy to fabricate one's own special tool for about $5 that will handle the dampener.

At the moment time is pressing me so I'll go the quick route now and do the factory routine over the winter.
__________________
'00 BMW R1100RT, Gone away: 5 previous BMW's, 3 Honda's, 2 Suzuki's
------------
"The object of life is not to be on the side of the majority, but to escape finding oneself in the ranks of the insane." - Marcus Aurelius
basketcase is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-10-2010, 05:51 AM   #18
gplassm
Studly Adventurer
 
gplassm's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2009
Location: Western Mass
Oddometer: 586
I lowered my DR650 a few months ago. I used the factory method. I used a tapered broomstick to hold the damper rod from spinning, and an electric impact wrench to spin the bolt out. Easy! You just remove the thick steel spacer from the top of the spring, and move it to the top of the top-out spring as mentioned.
In the rear, I would not recommend simply using the upper clevis mounting hole without flipping the lower spring collar over as well. Flipping the lower spring collar over raises the bottom out bumper (the bumper will sit on top of the collar, rather than down in it). If you do no perform this step, you risk having the suspension compress "too far", possibly allowing the tire to contact hard parts under the fender, and also possibly causing much grief with your upper chain roller. The entire "rear" mod can be done with the bike on a stand, and with the shock left in the bike. Simply back the spring preload collars all the way off, lift the spring up, pry the bottom out bumper up a bit, remove the lower spring collar (it is split to allow removal), remove the infamous steel tab that covers the upper mounting hole, flip the collar over, and reinstall everything. The whole process takes maybe 10 minutes.
The fornt end may take up to one hour.
Hint: loosen the upper triple clamp bolts, then loosen the fork caps, before removing the forks from the bike.
Complete fork parts break down can be found at bikebandit.com
__________________
Street bikes for the street. Dirt bikes for the dirt. Let's keep it that way.
gplassm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-2010, 10:42 AM   #19
Ivyleague
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Ivyleague's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2008
Location: Dizzyland
Oddometer: 172
DD (Developmental Disability) question

This hurts a lot more than having to stop and ask directions at a Quickstop or 7-11 (odds of getting correct answer = slightly lower than winning the Lottery). I have read this thread and every other one I can find because I need to lower my bike, but I really am a mechanical retard. So, with humble apology, I ask the following stupid questions:

1) If the bottom 8mm bolt holding the damper rod does, by chance, come out, will the oil in the fork follow? How much oil is in the fork and is it 15 wt?
2) To work on the front, either sliding forks up or disassembling fork tubes, I assume the bike needs to be jacked up with weight on rear wheel and off the front? Usually the bike comes up the other way???
3) how long does the tapered broomstick tool" need to be?
4) Is there a patron Saint for motorcycle maintenance?
Ivyleague is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2011, 01:32 PM   #20
Woody469
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Woody469's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2010
Location: Wichita, Ks.
Oddometer: 142
Quote:
Originally Posted by ram1000 View Post
I ride my wifes DR lowered by sliding the forks up and have not noticed a problem hitting the fender. It really doesn't make sense that it would clear though. You can measure the travel left after lifting the front end off the ground measure from the top of the wheel to the bottom of the fender. If there is 10" or so your ok. I would guess the travel is actuallu a little less than advertised.

How high is your wife's seat height and how tall etc for her? My wife is looking to get a DR and she is 5'7" and we need to be sure it is not too much bike for her! She rides a Honda 599 on the street but a 250 dual sport is just too damn small in my opinion for her! I think the 599 has a 32" seat but it is pretty high for her, she has to tiptoe it and this would be worse on the dirt!
Woody469 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2011, 01:11 PM   #21
Cuttle
me? what?
 
Cuttle's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2008
Location: Mars
Oddometer: 10,580
Quote:
Originally Posted by Woody469 View Post
How high is your wife's seat height and how tall etc for her? My wife is looking to get a DR and she is 5'7" and we need to be sure it is not too much bike for her! She rides a Honda 599 on the street but a 250 dual sport is just too damn small in my opinion for her! I think the 599 has a 32" seat but it is pretty high for her, she has to tiptoe it and this would be worse on the dirt!
If she is 5'7" even the standard seat height should be fine for her - keep in mind that the seat narrower than the 599 and it makes it much easier to get a foot down. I am 5'4" (30" inseam) and can ride the DR in stock height on the street, but I do have it lowered to make it a bit easier putting a foot down in the dirt. I am considering raising it back up to get a bit better ground clearance... I tend to get stuck on logs (ie fall over)
__________________
Cutītle (k?tīt'l)
1.(Zool) A cephalopod of the genus Sepia, having an internal shell, large eyes, and ten arms furnished with denticulated suckers, by means of which it secures its prey. 2. A foul-mouthed fellow
Cuttle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-21-2012, 01:56 AM   #22
Old Swiver
n00b
 
Joined: Sep 2009
Location: northern Australia, 320 days of sunshine
Oddometer: 7
Speedometer drive cable

Hi,
Just had my mechanic (youngest son) lower my 2010 DR following the factory manual, things have worked out well and I can get both feet on the ground. There is one small problem, the speedo cable is now too long and sticks out from the bike. How did you overcome this, is there a shorter cable from another bike or can it be rerouted or perhaps relocate the speedometer.
Thanks John
Old Swiver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2012, 08:00 AM   #23
Cuttle
me? what?
 
Cuttle's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2008
Location: Mars
Oddometer: 10,580
Quote:
Originally Posted by Old Swiver View Post
Hi,
Just had my mechanic (youngest son) lower my 2010 DR following the factory manual, things have worked out well and I can get both feet on the ground. There is one small problem, the speedo cable is now too long and sticks out from the bike. How did you overcome this, is there a shorter cable from another bike or can it be rerouted or perhaps relocate the speedometer.
Thanks John
How much did he lower the front end?

I did maybe 12mm (about 1/2 inch) in the beginning an it still was fine. I did reduce it to about 5mm now - makes for better handling.
__________________
Cutītle (k?tīt'l)
1.(Zool) A cephalopod of the genus Sepia, having an internal shell, large eyes, and ten arms furnished with denticulated suckers, by means of which it secures its prey. 2. A foul-mouthed fellow
Cuttle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2012, 08:20 AM   #24
basketcase
lifelong reject fixer
 
basketcase's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2004
Location: Fading...
Oddometer: 1,412
Quote:
Originally Posted by Old Swiver View Post
Hi,
Just had my mechanic (youngest son) lower my 2010 DR following the factory manual, things have worked out well and I can get both feet on the ground. There is one small problem, the speedo cable is now too long and sticks out from the bike. How did you overcome this, is there a shorter cable from another bike or can it be rerouted or perhaps relocate the speedometer.
Thanks John
I did my own lowering (factory option) and the cable now routes a bit awkwardly but it does not affect the handling or the function of the speedometer itself. Life's full of tradeoffs, as they say.

Sorry, I don't know of a shorter cable option.
__________________
'00 BMW R1100RT, Gone away: 5 previous BMW's, 3 Honda's, 2 Suzuki's
------------
"The object of life is not to be on the side of the majority, but to escape finding oneself in the ranks of the insane." - Marcus Aurelius
basketcase is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2012, 08:23 AM   #25
basketcase
lifelong reject fixer
 
basketcase's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2004
Location: Fading...
Oddometer: 1,412
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cuttle View Post
If she is 5'7" even the standard seat height should be fine for her - keep in mind that the seat narrower than the 599 and it makes it much easier to get a foot down. I am 5'4" (30" inseam) and can ride the DR in stock height on the street, but I do have it lowered to make it a bit easier putting a foot down in the dirt. I am considering raising it back up to get a bit better ground clearance... I tend to get stuck on logs (ie fall over)
Crossing the logs is a matter of technique. Pop the front wheel up and use a bit of momentum to "ka-plop" get over it.

That said, where I get hung up is on the centerstand. If it was not so helpful for chain lubing and other maintenance I would just snatch it off and stash it on a shelf.
__________________
'00 BMW R1100RT, Gone away: 5 previous BMW's, 3 Honda's, 2 Suzuki's
------------
"The object of life is not to be on the side of the majority, but to escape finding oneself in the ranks of the insane." - Marcus Aurelius
basketcase is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2012, 08:33 AM   #26
basketcase
lifelong reject fixer
 
basketcase's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2004
Location: Fading...
Oddometer: 1,412
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivyleague View Post
This hurts a lot more than having to stop and ask directions at a Quickstop or 7-11 (odds of getting correct answer = slightly lower than winning the Lottery). I have read this thread and every other one I can find because I need to lower my bike, but I really am a mechanical retard. So, with humble apology, I ask the following stupid questions:

1) If the bottom 8mm bolt holding the damper rod does, by chance, come out, will the oil in the fork follow? How much oil is in the fork and is it 15 wt?
2) To work on the front, either sliding forks up or disassembling fork tubes, I assume the bike needs to be jacked up with weight on rear wheel and off the front? Usually the bike comes up the other way???
3) how long does the tapered broomstick tool" need to be?
4) Is there a patron Saint for motorcycle maintenance?

1. The oil in the fork will drain. I'll check my shop manual later today and come back via edit with the amount. [The weight and amount in the Suzuki manual calls for 565 ml, aka, 19.1 US oz, of 10 wt fork oil.]
2. Yes, it will be necessary to get the front wheel off the ground to do the work. I used a floor jack and a piece of plywood under the bash plate to rock mine back on the center stand. If your bike does not have a center stand then actually lifting the bike and finding a way to stabilize it from the rear (tie down straps?) will be helpful.
3. I can't speak to what folks are doing with the broomstick trick but my factory tool for doing the fork mod is exactly 22" long. That leaves enough length sticking out to stick a screw driver through a hold for leverage.
4. If there is a patron saint for m/c maintenance he probably look weird in white flowery chaps and a jacket to match. Oh, gouge out my eyes, already!

Via edit: Regarding the amount of fork oil, the shop manual illustrates a retarded process for measuring the depth of the oil in the fork tube. That seems just strange to me ...

IOW, if the capacity of the fork tube is due to a precisely engineered size then it stands that draining the sucker and then pouring in the specified amount should not require a measurement of the oil with a glorified dipstick. FWIW, I put 565 ml of automatic transmission fluid in mine and let it sit a while for bubbles to float up and pop and then closed them up and went riding.

__________________
'00 BMW R1100RT, Gone away: 5 previous BMW's, 3 Honda's, 2 Suzuki's
------------
"The object of life is not to be on the side of the majority, but to escape finding oneself in the ranks of the insane." - Marcus Aurelius

basketcase screwed with this post 04-25-2012 at 01:23 PM Reason: Added fork oil amts and wt.
basketcase is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2012, 08:34 AM   #27
Cuttle
me? what?
 
Cuttle's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2008
Location: Mars
Oddometer: 10,580
Quote:
Originally Posted by basketcase View Post
Crossing the logs is a matter of technique. Pop the front wheel up and use a bit of momentum to "ka-plop" get over it.

That said, where I get hung up is on the centerstand. If it was not so helpful for chain lubing and other maintenance I would just snatch it off and stash it on a shelf.
I know, it's all about the technique.. - that's what you guys always say

j/k I do wish I had a bit more clearance (logs or not); some of the stuff we ride is pretty rudded and/or has big rocks - and I put my bash-plate to good use
__________________
Cutītle (k?tīt'l)
1.(Zool) A cephalopod of the genus Sepia, having an internal shell, large eyes, and ten arms furnished with denticulated suckers, by means of which it secures its prey. 2. A foul-mouthed fellow
Cuttle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-14-2012, 12:35 AM   #28
Ed~
What, Me Worry?
 
Ed~'s Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2010
Location: Bisbee, AZ
Oddometer: 332
Factory forks vs. sliding.

Just in the process of deciding what to do. Thanks for all the good ideas y'all.

Went to see a friend's DR that he had lowered factory way. The forks measured 33.5" at full extension after the factory modification.

Mine measures 35.25" currently at full extension.

Kinda stands to reason then that sliding the forks up 1 and 3/4" should lower the bike by same amount.
__________________
"It is better to be violent, if there is violence in our hearts, than to put on the cloak of non-violence to cover impotence. There is hope for a violent man to become non-violent. There is no such hope for the impotent." -Gandhi
Ed~ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-14-2012, 04:29 PM   #29
basketcase
lifelong reject fixer
 
basketcase's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2004
Location: Fading...
Oddometer: 1,412
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ed~ View Post
Just in the process of deciding what to do. Thanks for all the good ideas y'all.

Went to see a friend's DR that he had lowered factory way. The forks measured 33.5" at full extension after the factory modification.

Mine measures 35.25" currently at full extension.

Kinda stands to reason then that sliding the forks up 1 and 3/4" should lower the bike by same amount.
Keep in mind that when you go the factory route you lose an inch of travel, but you retain the benefit of the inner factory "stop" that keeps the tire thread from jamming into the fender. I've bottomed my forks twice riding rough national forest road. Once was in Wyoming riding the CDT, and the other was locally when jumping terraces on a fire road at speed. Both times I jarred myself so hard my head rung...

So yes, you can do the quickie lowering by sliding the tubes up in the triple clamps, but if you happen to bottom the forks coming off of a terrace on the forest road and the knobs jam into the fender and "stick" the tire, don't say you were not warned.

On the other hand, if you don't plan to do any hard riding off road and are likely to never bottom the forks, the slide the tubes up route is simplest by far.
__________________
'00 BMW R1100RT, Gone away: 5 previous BMW's, 3 Honda's, 2 Suzuki's
------------
"The object of life is not to be on the side of the majority, but to escape finding oneself in the ranks of the insane." - Marcus Aurelius
basketcase is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-14-2012, 10:42 PM   #30
Fire Escape
Beastly Adventurer
 
Fire Escape's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2007
Location: Epsom, NH
Oddometer: 1,544
Non-Factory Fork Lowering

I am heavy enough to count as two riders and rode on factory springs (with the fork tubes pushed up through the triple clamps 25mm) for three summers before finally getting new, heavier springs installed. With only 25mm of drop on the front, I never had the front tire hit the fender. I don't know how much more you can get away with safely. For me it makes sense to lower the "easy way" because I swap wheel sets back and forth. When the 17" street tire is on front I put the tubes back to 'full' height and slow the steering a little. It's nice not to have to drain and refill the forks twice a year along with the wheel changes. The rear is lowered as per the manual and stays that way year round. YMMV.


Bruce
__________________
No one calls the Fire Department because they did something smart!
06 DR 650, Moose RS Holder, Handguards and Skidplate, ProTaper bars, Garmin 60CSx, Motech racks w/ 20mm Ammo cans, Renazco, TKCs summer/17" SM wheels winter 08 Scrambler, Conti Trail Attacks and BlackTiger Fork mod, 05 FSE 450, 03 KLR 250, 02 FXDX, 72 WR 250 (again), 72 SL 350 K2 (again), 72 TR6R, 06 XT 225
Fire Escape is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 03:00 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014