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Old 04-11-2015, 11:48 AM   #1
US7IGN OP
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What is this bike model?

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Old 04-11-2015, 11:59 AM   #2
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Honda cb77 "superhawk"
It's a beautiful machine
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Old 04-11-2015, 12:50 PM   #3
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Thanks! I got it! https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honda_CB77
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Old 04-11-2015, 06:08 PM   #4
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The people on the bike are Robert Persig, author of Zen And The Art of Motorcycle Maintenance, and his son.
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Old 04-11-2015, 09:00 PM   #5
robtg
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Seems a shame putting all that crap on such a nice good handling bike.
It was a sport bike not a touring sled.
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Old 04-11-2015, 09:21 PM   #6
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Saw a Superhawk in white tucked away in a shop back home last week, pretty sweet for it's age.
I don't need another project and hauling it halfway across the country would be problematic.

History, everybody want's some.
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Old 04-11-2015, 11:06 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by robtg View Post
Seems a shame putting all that crap on such a nice good handling bike.
It was a sport bike not a touring sled.
Options were pretty limited in those days.

The only "big" bikes were Harleys and full-dress Indians - which were rare as Indian was in its death throes. BMWs were smaller than Harleys and far more expensive - and Pirsig's companions on that trip, John Sutherland and his wife, were on a BMW.

Pirsig didn't say, but I suspect he was as scared of the technological complications of the Boxer as he was proud of his mastery of the Honda twin. He remarks that John didn't know how to change breaker points; and that he was just banking on BMW's reputation for not giving trouble on the road. Not said was that Pirsig, not being a BMW owner or a professional mechanic, probably didn't know how to do that on a Boxer, either.
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Old 04-12-2015, 09:12 AM   #8
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I bet young guys today can't conceive how much work it took to keep that drive chain lubed and adjusted with such a load over such a journey. Sometimes progress is a good thing.
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Old 04-12-2015, 10:12 AM   #9
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back when

Back in the day was very much ride what you owned, touring bikes were whatever you toured on. And could afford.
My riding buddy (80 now) toured 2 up on a BSA Bantam on one of his favorite trips.
My first street bike was a used 66 Benelli 125 single 4 stroke. Ridden far if not fast.
305 Hondas could approach if not do 100 mph.
My first new motorcycle was a 71 CL350 (20cc larger than 305, only nominally 350).
The big bikes, Harley, Indian, Triumph, BSA had sweet spots in there ridding envelope, sustained high speed was not in it.
I went from a 66 Triumph to the CL350 for the sustained high speed ability.
Rode 9,500 rpm all I could.
My 77 BMW 750 r75/7 with Luftmeister fairing, Krauser bags and trunk topped out at 95 mph. It would sustain it though. Add 10 mph if you removed bags. My 73 Suzuki GT550 was fater and quicker in both riding configurations I used. Windshield and saddle bags, or Windjammer and saddle bags.
73 GT550 was about $1500? or less out the door. $1300?
77 BMW R75/7 was $3000+, $4500 with Luftmeister, bags,and trunk?
In 78 BMW offered fairing and bags at an almost no cost package deal.
Made my 77 unsaleable at a reasonable price.

Anyway in the 50s and 60s, into the 70s, touring was an attitude, not a displacement contest. (like todays loaded small dual sport bikes)
I knew people who toured Sears Allstate Puch twingle 250s, CB160s, CB175s, even a Matchless single.

A bike today is best if it can sustain a highway speed about 80 mph.
Back then you could pick routes where 45 mph was reasonable. Very different world.
Tires and brakes were another interesting topic, yes.

ctfz1 screwed with this post 04-12-2015 at 10:20 AM
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Old 04-12-2015, 02:40 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mista Vern View Post
I bet young guys today can't conceive how much work it took to keep that drive chain lubed and adjusted with such a load over such a journey. Sometimes progress is a good thing.
That was a central backdrop theme of Pirsig's journal. He took the reader through one morning's maintenance drill...starting with why it was important to get one's mind right. He likened it to a religious ritual - you set the icons (tools) out and you made the stations (inspecting wear points in a familiar pattern). Then you took out the communal set (feeler gauges) and gave Holy Communion (testing the valve clearances all around) while contemplating the holy (Pirsig was wondering why his plugs were running rich, not realizing at first that he was 3000 feet above sea level). While finding the one mal-adjusted tappet, he was tightening bolts, inspecting the chain, snugging brake cables.

He compared it to the habit of his companion John, who'd just jump on his BMW and start pumping with the kickstarter. That morning, Pirsig remarked to the reader, he didn't know what John would do if he had a failure on the BMW in the Dakotas - since the nearest mechanic for one would be thousands of miles away, any direction. Sell it to the Indians, maybe, he said. Or maybe just push it onto a bridge and heave it over the railing.

Times were definitely different back then.
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Old 04-12-2015, 08:37 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ctfz1 View Post
Back in the day was very much ride what you owned, touring bikes were whatever you toured on. And could afford.
My riding buddy (80 now) toured 2 up on a BSA Bantam on one of his favorite trips.
My first street bike was a used 66 Benelli 125 single 4 stroke. Ridden far if not fast.
305 Hondas could approach if not do 100 mph.
My first new motorcycle was a 71 CL350 (20cc larger than 305, only nominally 350).
The big bikes, Harley, Indian, Triumph, BSA had sweet spots in there ridding envelope, sustained high speed was not in it.
I went from a 66 Triumph to the CL350 for the sustained high speed ability.
Rode 9,500 rpm all I could.
My 77 BMW 750 r75/7 with Luftmeister fairing, Krauser bags and trunk topped out at 95 mph. It would sustain it though. Add 10 mph if you removed bags. My 73 Suzuki GT550 was fater and quicker in both riding configurations I used. Windshield and saddle bags, or Windjammer and saddle bags.
73 GT550 was about $1500? or less out the door. $1300?
77 BMW R75/7 was $3000+, $4500 with Luftmeister, bags,and trunk?
In 78 BMW offered fairing and bags at an almost no cost package deal.
Made my 77 unsaleable at a reasonable price.

Anyway in the 50s and 60s, into the 70s, touring was an attitude, not a displacement contest. (like todays loaded small dual sport bikes)
I knew people who toured Sears Allstate Puch twingle 250s, CB160s, CB175s, even a Matchless single.

A bike today is best if it can sustain a highway speed about 80 mph.
Back then you could pick routes where 45 mph was reasonable. Very different world.
Tires and brakes were another interesting topic, yes.
Thank you sir, good post.
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Old 04-13-2015, 12:14 AM   #12
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There are many people here who had read Pirsig
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Old 04-13-2015, 06:56 AM   #13
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+1 on run what you brung....on our trips up to Laconia everything from BMW /2 to Yamaha 175 enduros.... Had one hell of a time no matter what you were on...so yes no one I know would have given that 305 a second thought... You pushed a button and it started ! A lot more than some of the pieces of rolling crap that you were riding with...
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