ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Gear > Equipment
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 06-08-2008, 10:18 AM   #46
RSL
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Jun 2003
Oddometer: 4,360
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grinnin
So show us your camping setup on the MC and off.

Ray probably doesn't spend all day with 70mph winds. I can easily hit 10 Lbs on a day trip if the weather starts cold, turns hot, and may rain at any time. I'm including the tools in that weight. For camping, my gear is fairly bulky but not heavy. That said, my next trip will see me carrying 30 or 35 Lbs for camping plus a city visit.

EDIT: Oh, and I'm taking a quart of Maine maple syrup to my Dad and bringing home a few yards of that really heavy coated nylon that's been in his basement. Sounds like about 40 Lbs.
I'm sorry if I hurt anybody's feelings with my comments about clunky stuff and extra weight and drag. That said, have another look at some of the previously posted pics of all sorts of things stuck on motorcycles, which add vast amounts of weight and drag, compromising fuel economy, handling, efficiency, and safety.

Then, spend an hour or so Googling keywords such as "ultralight backpacking" and "Ray Jardine" and get an idea what some folks have done regarding limiting weight and bulk when they go for days or weeks solo hiking, say, the Appalachian Trail. If these folks can thrive on efficient & ultralight equipment carried on their backs, then surely we motorcyclists can progress to carrying reduced but sufficient loads on our bikes.

I don't have pics to post yet, but probably will after my next trip in a few weeks. My stuff includes 3 man dome tent, sleeping bag, pad, ground cloth, stove, tools including hatchet, food, a couple of changes of clothes, hygiene kit, Walkman, etc...normal camping gear. I don't use my BMW hard bags any more, because they hang in the breeze like speed brakes, with far too much weight and drag. Instead, I bag the bulky stuff into a plastic garbage bag in teardrop configuration and bungie it to the pillion seat. This makes a nice backrest for me, and being teardrop-shaped, streamlines the bike. I get ~51 mpg cruising @ 80-85 mph, which is better economy than without the streamlined package.

Last summer, 6 of us went motorcycle camping through the Canadian Rockies, each with essentially the same tent, bag, etc.. My stuff is just a lot less bulky, having taken a bit of care in packaging it.

Bottom line: Most of the stuff we carry is unnecessarily heavy and bulky, and its weight and bulk could be easily reduced by ~2/3. And, it can be carried in a much more streamlined and therefore efficient way, which enhances fuel economy rather than degrading it.

Next step: Dump the BMW, which although a nice bike, is itself ~150-200 lbs. too heavy. If the "Long Way 'Round" crew had planned better, they would have used Honda XR650R bikes and ultralight camping gear, for much greater efficiency.
RSL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-2008, 05:15 PM   #47
Zombie_Stomp
Aspiring human
 
Zombie_Stomp's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2007
Location: SE Portland/ Carrboroland NC
Oddometer: 2,231
Quote:
Originally Posted by RSL
I'm sorry if I hurt anybody's feelings with my comments about clunky stuff and extra weight and drag. That said, have another look at some of the previously posted pics of all sorts of things stuck on motorcycles, which add vast amounts of weight and drag, compromising fuel economy, handling, efficiency, and safety.

Then, spend an hour or so Googling keywords such as "ultralight backpacking" and "Ray Jardine" and get an idea what some folks have done regarding limiting weight and bulk when they go for days or weeks solo hiking, say, the Appalachian Trail. If these folks can thrive on efficient & ultralight equipment carried on their backs, then surely we motorcyclists can progress to carrying reduced but sufficient loads on our bikes.

I don't have pics to post yet, but probably will after my next trip in a few weeks. My stuff includes 3 man dome tent, sleeping bag, pad, ground cloth, stove, tools including hatchet, food, a couple of changes of clothes, hygiene kit, Walkman, etc...normal camping gear. I don't use my BMW hard bags any more, because they hang in the breeze like speed brakes, with far too much weight and drag. Instead, I bag the bulky stuff into a plastic garbage bag in teardrop configuration and bungie it to the pillion seat. This makes a nice backrest for me, and being teardrop-shaped, streamlines the bike. I get ~51 mpg cruising @ 80-85 mph, which is better economy than without the streamlined package.

Last summer, 6 of us went motorcycle camping through the Canadian Rockies, each with essentially the same tent, bag, etc.. My stuff is just a lot less bulky, having taken a bit of care in packaging it.

Bottom line: Most of the stuff we carry is unnecessarily heavy and bulky, and its weight and bulk could be easily reduced by ~2/3. And, it can be carried in a much more streamlined and therefore efficient way, which enhances fuel economy rather than degrading it.

Next step: Dump the BMW, which although a nice bike, is itself ~150-200 lbs. too heavy. If the "Long Way 'Round" crew had planned better, they would have used Honda XR650R bikes and ultralight camping gear, for much greater efficiency.
Security of the things in the panniers is an issue. I'm going to be travelling from city to city with camping gear as a backup plan, whilst carrying expensive items like a laptop for example. That's why I (we?) need some sort of lockable pannier. I don't have a lot of money to spend. I've got a certain amount of stuff I've got to carry. If you can show us with some photos or a link to a photo of a more streamlined, efficient, secure, cheap way of achieving this, I'd appreciate it more than just telling us our rigs are not where it's at and to go google about ultralight backpacking. Not all of us are doing backpacking. One thing about mermite panniers (the main topic) is that once you go through the very hard work of gutting them, there's usually no turning back after going through all that work. That and the lack of an equally inexpensive and secure alternative has me stuck on these.
__________________
1982 4x4 longbed, a rolling daily driver work-in-progress...
1987 Yamaha XT600 2KF (German)
STOLEN: RED XL600 in Portland

I do heavy-duty textile repair, upholstery, and design/manufacture bags.
Zombie_Stomp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-2008, 07:39 PM   #48
Zombie_Stomp
Aspiring human
 
Zombie_Stomp's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2007
Location: SE Portland/ Carrboroland NC
Oddometer: 2,231
Quote:
Originally Posted by RSL
MOD EDIT: IT'S NOT OK TO POST PM'S IN FORUMS
I think you're stepping on some toes in this thread.
I'm trying to figure out why you've come onto this one single thread about panniers to show us your opinion on them. Thousands of people use big, boxy, draggy panniers because they are practical for them to use, and we're broke on this thread, or we just like being frugal, OR, we just like the way they look, so we make our own. That's like one of us going and bashing the guys who buy them and saying they need to make their own because it's more frugal.

You don't have a profile, you say for internet privacy. You state the same reason for not posting your personal motorcycling adventures. Yet someone private messages you with their beef, (not me, for the record) and you blow it up on the forum for us all to see. Seems like a double standard of yours that is only going to create more friction.

I think the mermites with their smooth edges are going to have less drag than those square cornered ones that are so popular. No, my laptop would probably not be crushed from a fall, as I am putting it between layers of clothes or in a top box. Of course there are no guarantees no matter where I put it. I would at least like for it to be in a somewhat theft proof environment.

I will no longer argue the practicality of my choice of container. (Ok, ok, so I had my rant. I have nothing better to do as you can see) This thread's title is PENNY TECH PANNIERS, and the only posts I'm going to make are going to be of bikes with PENNY TECH PANNIERS on them, and my own pics of me making my rack for them to go on, refinishing, etc. Whether or not I like them will be decided when I bolt them on, load them up, and go for a ride. I'll have a lot more money in my pocket to get something else than if I'd bought new manufactured or possibly even used ones.
__________________
1982 4x4 longbed, a rolling daily driver work-in-progress...
1987 Yamaha XT600 2KF (German)
STOLEN: RED XL600 in Portland

I do heavy-duty textile repair, upholstery, and design/manufacture bags.

GB screwed with this post 06-09-2008 at 04:43 AM
Zombie_Stomp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-2008, 07:56 PM   #49
Zombie_Stomp
Aspiring human
 
Zombie_Stomp's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2007
Location: SE Portland/ Carrboroland NC
Oddometer: 2,231
In regards to durability:

This is probably before, whether judging from the lack of sand on the bike or the beer in his hand, but it looks to me like the smiling guy loves his merm-pans. (probably klrcarl, this is from his post)
__________________
1982 4x4 longbed, a rolling daily driver work-in-progress...
1987 Yamaha XT600 2KF (German)
STOLEN: RED XL600 in Portland

I do heavy-duty textile repair, upholstery, and design/manufacture bags.
Zombie_Stomp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-2008, 08:39 PM   #50
RSL
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Jun 2003
Oddometer: 4,360
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zombie_Stomp
In regards to durability:

This is probably before, whether judging from the lack of sand on the bike or the beer in his hand, but it looks to me like the smiling guy loves his merm-pans. (probably klrcarl, this is from his post)

That's good info to have, Zombie, and thanks for posting it. Looks like that Merm can saved some damage to the bike, and maybe the rider's leg, too. My Craven fiberglass boxes on my old (then new) Triumph performed the same function some decades ago, but I won't hazard a guess what might have been the result at highway speed against hard surfaces.

Again, I did not mean to hurt anybody's feelings with my comments or suggestions about penny tech method to carry stuff on a motorcycle. That said, oio's picture of the red box and stuff on his post #37 may add substance to my (and other folks') suggestion that losing weight and bulk is a good idea.

I envy you for your Merm project, which appears well executed. Also, your XR600 project seems to me very worthwhile. In fact, I have an eye out for a good used XR600R or XR650R for offroad and dual uses. This because not only are those good bikes, but they are relatively light and therefore much more agile. Light agile bike + ultralight camping gear per Ray Jardine et al = efficient and longrange adventure touring for less effort and $4.25/gal. fuel. That is my notion of a penny tech ideal.

FWIW, my background is aviation, where every pound and gallon counts: May as well apply the same lessons to motorcycles, esp. offroad and penny tech ones.
RSL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-2008, 08:52 PM   #51
L1gunman
Abner Snopes
 
L1gunman's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2002
Location: A Manufactured Home Community
Oddometer: 10,037
i think that given that the panniers are going to be used on a 650 thumper, aerodynamic efficiency might not be a huge deal. id suggest that for an extended trip, camping most of the way, doing a fair amount of offroad riding, and presumably taking your time so as to enjoy the area in which youre travelling, my chief concern would be whether or not i could easily take the panniers off the bike and use them to sit on while i drank a beer somewhere.

and if i have 2 panniers, then i have a place to put my beer, or a place for a friend to sit.
L1gunman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-2008, 05:38 AM   #52
Grinnin
Forever N00b
 
Joined: Dec 2005
Location: Maine
Oddometer: 2,582
Sorry for the threadjack; I tried to move this elsewhere, but it popped back.

It was my beef with a post that didn't show any experience to back the criticism. Backpacking IS different from motorcycling.

Ray Jardine does have some good ideas for backpacking. I'd already had my years under a tarp starting with a 1970 trip on the Appalacian Trail and ending in '77 when I went back to tents. For my bicycle tours around the eastern U.S. I packed pretty light and not so wide. I was doing less of both of these when I first encountered Ray Jardine's ideas in the late '80s.

For a motorcycle it just matters a little less. For my bikes the gas economy is far better at 60 than at 80 even with just a tank bag. More so with other luggage. Different strokes. I haven't tried a new lightweight stove since . . . last month.

The mermite cans look like they have the strength and capacity at a light weight. Go for it.
__________________
Motorcycles are magical.

Grinnin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-27-2008, 08:54 PM   #53
Zombie_Stomp
Aspiring human
 
Zombie_Stomp's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2007
Location: SE Portland/ Carrboroland NC
Oddometer: 2,231
Updating with the progress being made on my setup. They're mounted about as close in as I could get them, save maybe an inch on each side just in case. Now all I need to do is make a crossbar and some braces that go forward to the frame just under my side covers, and fabricate/weld tabs I can bolt to down there.

__________________
1982 4x4 longbed, a rolling daily driver work-in-progress...
1987 Yamaha XT600 2KF (German)
STOLEN: RED XL600 in Portland

I do heavy-duty textile repair, upholstery, and design/manufacture bags.
Zombie_Stomp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-28-2008, 11:32 PM   #54
nashopolis
Studly Adventurer
 
nashopolis's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2006
Location: Nashville, Tenn
Oddometer: 716
stomp, Zombie
can you show us some pics of how you attached the cans to the racks?

thanks
nashopolis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-2008, 06:53 AM   #55
Zombie_Stomp
Aspiring human
 
Zombie_Stomp's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2007
Location: SE Portland/ Carrboroland NC
Oddometer: 2,231
Next time I'm in the shop, either today or Tuesday, I am probably going to finish up making them, at which point I can take some more detailed photos like that. To tell you in words, I've got a piece of aluminum channel at the bottom which hangs over the little rail at the bottom, and then I've got two knobs in each can with bolts at the top, so that one can only remove the can from inside when unlocked and opened. Only downside is that when fully packed, you'd have to partially unpack to acess the knobs. I don't mind much, as I'm just itching to go on my adventure across the country, and isn't that what it's all about?
__________________
1982 4x4 longbed, a rolling daily driver work-in-progress...
1987 Yamaha XT600 2KF (German)
STOLEN: RED XL600 in Portland

I do heavy-duty textile repair, upholstery, and design/manufacture bags.
Zombie_Stomp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2008, 10:04 PM   #56
Bo Pop Pop
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Bo Pop Pop's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2004
Location: "Elsewhere Area"
Oddometer: 179
Old idea - new life

I stumbled upon this thread today and the link that Pilot noted brought me back a few years to my experience with Mermites. In a phrase - "Well worth the effort!" I use 'em whenever I travel to where I'll need to lock things up. I do avoid using them for trips on the KLR when the riding is expected to be technical - hard cases can be hell on Achilles tendons.

Here's a link to my smugmug record with my version of mounting options on my KLR. I DO love that bike but it's looking like a Versys has a reserved spot in my garage sometime soon.

FWIW - another way: http://flintriver13.smugmug.com/gall...38804360_r784Q

Pat
__________________
= = = = = = = = = = = = =
" . . . treading trodden trails for a long, long time . . ."

"It's easier to stay found - than to get un-lost"
Bo Pop Pop is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2008, 09:07 AM   #57
scubasmith67
Adventurer
 
Joined: Jun 2008
Location: Naples, FL
Oddometer: 20
Great idea!!

These look nice guys!
scubasmith67 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-2009, 04:08 PM   #58
BLACK 6 ALPHA
Here, now.
 
BLACK 6 ALPHA's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2008
Location: Puget Sound, WA
Oddometer: 35
What happened to the pictures in the original posts?
__________________
1759 Socity

"You will know me by the scars I bear,
You will know m eby the hate I swear"

RLTW
BLACK 6 ALPHA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-2009, 07:00 PM   #59
Zombie_Stomp
Aspiring human
 
Zombie_Stomp's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2007
Location: SE Portland/ Carrboroland NC
Oddometer: 2,231
Quote:
Originally Posted by BLACK 6 ALPHA
What happened to the pictures in the original posts?
Sounds like it's time to make a donation to the ADV site.

They must be running low on server space, the site has had no room for anyone to upload any photos, usually 1 per post is allowed, and it is often disabled. So maybe this has actually somehow put some of the photos "on hold" for a while or something.

There are no ads like on Thumper Talk or the like, so it's all run on our donation money.

Joel
__________________
1982 4x4 longbed, a rolling daily driver work-in-progress...
1987 Yamaha XT600 2KF (German)
STOLEN: RED XL600 in Portland

I do heavy-duty textile repair, upholstery, and design/manufacture bags.
Zombie_Stomp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2009, 09:32 AM   #60
pilot OP
Slacker Moderator
 
pilot's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2002
Location: Kansas City
Oddometer: 31,283
Quote:
Originally Posted by BLACK 6 ALPHA
What happened to the pictures in the original posts?
I hadn't noticed this thread had been bumped in years. The original pictures were attached. That function is temporarily disabled. As soon as the server issue is cleared up, they will be back. If you would like to see the photos, I can repost them as linked images. Let me know.

RSL, you didn't hurt anyone's feelings, you just hijacked the thread for personal opinion, not being constructive. That is your foul. The merits of ultra light camping is a topic for it's own thread. Take it there. It has nothing to do with low cost panniers.
__________________
The other 10% are sociopaths , serial killers and KLR riders. You wont get much sympathy from them.
-Furious D

I first had sex at the age of 13. However, my butt hurt so bad I never did it again.
- Mista Vern
pilot is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 05:39 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014