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Old 11-04-2006, 02:04 PM   #1
snaggleXR650 OP
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counting chain links?

I need to determine the length of chain on my '04 625 SXC. Do you count the rollers or side plates or what? Thanks for the information.
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Old 11-04-2006, 02:15 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by snaggleXR650
I need to determine the length of chain on my '04 625 SXC. Do you count the rollers or side plates or what? Thanks for the information.
Side plates.
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dirtypumpkin screwed with this post 11-04-2006 at 04:45 PM
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Old 11-04-2006, 04:01 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kawidual
Side plates.
One rule of thumb someone from sprocket specialists
told me was add your sprocket teeth total then x2.

Stock DRZ for example
ie - 15+44=59, 59x2=118 links
???????????????

Count your sprocket teeth and multiply by 2.....I think they were bullshiting you !!!! The sprockets don't know how far it is between them.

To get the proper chain, count the rollers or I think it's easier to count the plates (master link too) then multiply by 2.

A 120 link chain has 120 rollers.........

CBXMan screwed with this post 11-04-2006 at 05:25 PM
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Old 11-04-2006, 04:45 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CBXMan
???????????????

Count your sprocket teeth and multiply by 2.....I think they were bullshiting you !!!! The sprockets don't know how far it is between them.

To get the proper chain, count the rollers or I think it's easier to count the plates (master link too) then divide by 2.

A 120 link chain has 120 rollers.........
I remember them emailing me that Id need one link per tooth as a starting point.
I was asking about making a gearing change when I emailed them for length.

After looking it up the stock DRZ chain in 112, so that method isnt that great.

Last I fit was a 116 to run a larger rear sprocket.

Forget the method they told me, going to delete that bad advice...

This is in their chain info on the site, no mention of that other advice they emailed me.

HOW TO COUNT LINKS
Every pair of sideplates (both inner and outer) counts as one link. Chains always have an even number of links.
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Old 11-04-2006, 05:01 PM   #5
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The above is incorrect. Every sideplate is one link. The reason you can only have even length chains is because you can't connect a wide link to another wide link.

Your best bet is to count the rollers.
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Old 11-04-2006, 05:15 PM   #6
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Okay, here is the actual way to do it.
Count all the outer plates (including the master link), and multiply by 2. (Only on one side of the chain, of course.)
Each plate (inner & outer) is considered 1 link, so, if you only count the outer plates, you must X2.
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Old 11-04-2006, 05:33 PM   #7
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Anyway you want to look at it or count it, if you order a 100 link chain, your going to get a chain with 50 plates on each side and 100 rollers. I see your point that 50 plates on each side equals 100 total, but I think the mfg's are referring to the number of pins in the chain.

I edited my first post, I typed divide when I had multiply on the brain.....
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Old 11-04-2006, 05:33 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bayou Boy
The reason you can only have even length chains is because you can't connect a wide link to another wide link.
Oh yes you can! It' s called a one roller or half link.
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Old 11-04-2006, 06:03 PM   #9
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Hree's the offical answer from EK's website. Each outer and inner pair of sideplate on the chain count as a link.

How do I count chain links?

Every pair of sideplates – both inner plates and outer plates – counts as one link when determining chain length. If your bike is supposed to have a 110-link chain, count every single inner and outer plate on one side of the chain until you reach 110.
Chains will always have an even number of links. If your uninstalled chain has inner plates on both ends, or outer plates on both ends, you’ve miscounted.


Every pair of sideplates – both inner plalinks. If your uninstalled chain has inner plates on both ends, or outer plates on both ends, you’ve miscounted.

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Old 11-04-2006, 06:29 PM   #10
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It's amazing how such a simplistic idea can get so complicated. I've been riding bikes forever, and I'm a decent wrench, but I never really knew 'for sure' how to count links in a chain. I'm used to Honda specifying the # of links in the manual. Now, with my KTM, the manual doesn't state the # of links, so I'm lost ;)

I counted rollers, and came up with 114 links. I'll redo my count with sideplates X 2 and see if I come up with 57 links. Thanks.
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Old 11-04-2006, 06:35 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jehu
Oh yes you can! It' s called a one roller or half link.

I can't think of a single motorcycle (or bicycle) that I would feel comfortable riding with that tiny pin in the chain link.

Just because it's possible doesn't make it a good idea.
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Old 11-04-2006, 06:57 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by crankpin
I have always just sat down at the rear of the bike, taken a drop of whiteout or paint, and mark a pin. Now count the sprocket teeth holes in the chain in one full revolution. ie number of teeth holes = number of link chain.
Can also mark that pin and the forward or rear tooth ....turn and count until she comes back around. You know how many teeth are on the rear. A 20 second deal.
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Old 11-04-2006, 07:29 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bayou Boy
I can't think of a single motorcycle (or bicycle) that I would feel comfortable riding with that tiny pin in the chain link.

Just because it's possible doesn't make it a good idea.
I've seen them in use on vintage bikes. I've never really understood why anyone would need or want one but it's an old technology.
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Old 11-04-2006, 07:59 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bayou Boy
I can't think of a single motorcycle (or bicycle) that I would feel comfortable riding with that tiny pin in the chain link.

Just because it's possible doesn't make it a good idea.
+1
Half links or offset links are nothing but trouble. They may be OK in something really low speed or really hard to adjust.
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Old 11-05-2006, 10:25 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by katbeanz
Half links or offset links are nothing but trouble. They may be OK in something really low speed or really hard to adjust.
Wow, that is the very first time I ever saw one of those!
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