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Old 05-19-2003, 10:17 PM   #1
Bitt OP
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Question Spark plugs & Anti-seize

Just a quick question.
What is the right amount of ani-seize to apply to the spark plug threads.
Here's what I did... brushed it on carefully covering the threads and then wiped off most except what was down in the threads. Sound ok?? It looks right, I just don't want it turning to liquid and fouling up my new rebuild.
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Old 05-19-2003, 10:38 PM   #2
John Macdonald
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a little bit will do...

And it won't bother your motor's guts either.
Get it on there and don't worry. All it'll do is help you out in the future when you want to remove the plug.
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Old 05-20-2003, 12:04 AM   #3
bigrichard
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If ya wanna worry, try this.
Avoid getting antisneaze on plug threads that project into combustion chamber. Some people feel it bakes to a hard abrasive that is unkind to head threads as plug comes out.
I was using some antisieze earlier today and happened to read the ingredients. One was ceramics. So there might be something to the theory.
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Old 05-20-2003, 07:22 AM   #4
RubberDown
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I'm not a big fan of anti seize. However, I've been using Bel Ray's Assembly Lube on all sorts of stuff for years. It doesn't harden up like regular anti seize, and it lasts forever. I'm still on the same container I bought about 10 years ago! It (supposedly) won't affect your torque readings either. The only downside of the stuff is it's about impossible to get off your hands.

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Old 05-20-2003, 07:42 AM   #5
Bitt OP
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Thanks for the response.
That Bel Ray sounds great. Also, I can't fit any of my sockets onto the plug (need a thin wall) so I had to use the plug tool from the kit and guess on the torque settings - I tightened it until it put the same dent in me hand as getting it out. Reminded me of working on my old POS Yamaha twin I had in high school that would foul the plugs so often I had to have an extra clean set with me everywhere I rode - Those never got a chance to seize.
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Old 05-20-2003, 08:28 AM   #6
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How about just putting a little motor oil on the threads instead?
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Old 05-20-2003, 08:52 AM   #7
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oil will burn off.

applying antiseize...just dab a bit on the threads and spread it around. then wipe it off with a paper towel. the residue that remains is more than sufficient.
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Old 05-20-2003, 09:08 AM   #8
Bitt OP
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Quote:
Said Chopperman:
oil will burn off.

applying antiseize...just dab a bit on the threads and spread it around. then wipe it off with a paper towel. the residue that remains is more than sufficient.
Damn - that means I did something right for a change.:):
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Old 05-20-2003, 09:34 AM   #9
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Here's what Autolite says about using anti-seize (snicked off the net somewhere):

We do not recommend the use of any anti seize products for installing spark plugs. Anti seize compounds are typically composed of metallic,
electrically conductive ingredients. If anti seize compounds come in
contact with the core nose of the plugs, it can lead to a misfire condition.
Anti seize compounds can also have a torque multiplying effect when
installing plugs. This can lead to thread distortion and thread galling
resulting in cylinder head damage. Autolite spark plugs are nickel plated
to resist the effects of corrosion and seizing. However, plug seizure is
aggravated further when steel plugs are installed into aluminum cylinder
heads for a long period of time.


Here's what AC/Delco says:

Do not use any type of anti-seize compound on spark plug threads. Doing this will decrease the amount of friction between the threads. The result of the lowered friction is that when the spark plug is torqued to the proper specification, the spark plug is turned too far into the cylinder head. This increases the likelihood of pulling or stripping the threads in the cylinder head. Over-tightening of a spark plug can cause stretching of the spark plug shell and could allow blowby to pass through the gasket seal between the shell and insulator. Over-tightening also results in extremely difficult removal.


I also saw that if you decide to use anti-seize, you should reduce the torque value by 20%.
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Old 05-20-2003, 10:26 AM   #10
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Quote:
Said fish:
Here's what Autolite says about using anti-seize (snicked off the net somewhere):

We do not recommend the use of any anti seize products for installing spark plugs. Anti seize compounds are typically composed of metallic,
electrically conductive ingredients. If anti seize compounds come in
contact with the core nose of the plugs, it can lead to a misfire condition.
Anti seize compounds can also have a torque multiplying effect when
installing plugs. This can lead to thread distortion and thread galling
resulting in cylinder head damage. Autolite spark plugs are nickel plated
to resist the effects of corrosion and seizing. However, plug seizure is
aggravated further when steel plugs are installed into aluminum cylinder
heads for a long period of time.


Here's what AC/Delco says:

Do not use any type of anti-seize compound on spark plug threads. Doing this will decrease the amount of friction between the threads. The result of the lowered friction is that when the spark plug is torqued to the proper specification, the spark plug is turned too far into the cylinder head. This increases the likelihood of pulling or stripping the threads in the cylinder head. Over-tightening of a spark plug can cause stretching of the spark plug shell and could allow blowby to pass through the gasket seal between the shell and insulator. Over-tightening also results in extremely difficult removal.


I also saw that if you decide to use anti-seize, you should reduce the torque value by 20%.
Despite what the mfrs. say, I'm a believer in anti-sieze on plugs. When you pull plugs out notice the carbon discoloring around the end threads? The problem I've seen is variance in the thread dimensions between plug and head allowing the intrusion of unburned fuel between plug and head and coking-up of the threads. Never had a problem where I've used AS on the plug threads.

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Old 05-20-2003, 11:02 AM   #11
Chopperman
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Quote:
Said fish:
Here's what Autolite says about using anti-seize (snicked off the net somewhere):

We do not recommend the use of any anti seize products for installing spark plugs. Anti seize compounds are typically composed of metallic,
electrically conductive ingredients. If anti seize compounds come in
contact with the core nose of the plugs, it can lead to a misfire condition.
Anti seize compounds can also have a torque multiplying effect when
installing plugs. This can lead to thread distortion and thread galling
resulting in cylinder head damage. Autolite spark plugs are nickel plated
to resist the effects of corrosion and seizing. However, plug seizure is
aggravated further when steel plugs are installed into aluminum cylinder
heads for a long period of time.


Here's what AC/Delco says:

Do not use any type of anti-seize compound on spark plug threads. Doing this will decrease the amount of friction between the threads. The result of the lowered friction is that when the spark plug is torqued to the proper specification, the spark plug is turned too far into the cylinder head. This increases the likelihood of pulling or stripping the threads in the cylinder head. Over-tightening of a spark plug can cause stretching of the spark plug shell and could allow blowby to pass through the gasket seal between the shell and insulator. Over-tightening also results in extremely difficult removal.


I also saw that if you decide to use anti-seize, you should reduce the torque value by 20%.
SOunds like CYA to me. The torque on a spark plug is not much at all. Just enough to deform the washer. You are more likely to strip a plug hole from overtightening than you are from using antiseize.
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Old 05-20-2003, 12:34 PM   #12
kevbo
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Anti-sieze paste GOOD. Yeah, if you went nuts with it you could cause trouble. A little dab 'ill do ya.
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Old 05-20-2003, 04:23 PM   #13
Achtung
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the temp rating on a sparke plug (FR6DC being the four valve gs plug and 6 being the temp range) is an indication to how fast that plug can dissipate heat. applying anti sieze to a plug changes the rate in which it can do that and therefore changes the heat range of the plug, which of course is carefully engineered by a bunch of germans in leather aprons. if you tourque the plug to the proper spec and follow factory intervals anti sieze is not necessary.
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Old 05-20-2003, 07:31 PM   #14
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Quote:
Said RubberDown:I've been using Bel Ray's Assembly Lube on all sorts of stuff for years.

Eric
'01 R1150GS
Is that stuff intended for high temperatures and as an anti-seize?

Assembly Lube in my books is stuff you use when assembling a new or rebuilt motor. You coat all bearing surfaces with it such as: main, conrod and cam bearings, cam lobes and followers, etc.

I've been using anti-seize as long as I can remember. Anytime a spark plug is mated with an aluminium head, anti-seize should be used. Oil or grease should not be used. Anti-seize is basically a carrier with copper and/or zinc powder blended in.

The manufaturer's statements about not getting it on the core nose (insulator) is true, but that isn't an issue. All you do is put a thin coat on the threads only. I wipe off any that coats the non threaded end of the plug (the last 2 mm).

As for a torque multiplying effect, their statement is true as well. Spark plug torque specifications are for "dry" threads. I go with the minimum torque recommendation of 15 lbf.ft. for my 14 mm (Bosch W7DC) GS plugs. You won't strip them, trust me. Far too often, people over torque spark plugs. They aren't holding anything on. All they have to do is create a seal and transfer heat...as well as spark of course.
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Old 05-20-2003, 09:28 PM   #15
RubberDown
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Quote:
Said Global Rider:
Is that stuff intended for high temperatures and as an anti-seize?

Assembly Lube in my books is stuff you use when assembling a new or rebuilt motor. You coat all bearing surfaces with it such as: main, conrod and cam bearings, cam lobes and followers, etc.

I've been using anti-seize as long as I can remember. Anytime a spark plug is mated with an aluminium head, anti-seize should be used. Oil or grease should not be used. Anti-seize is basically a carrier with copper and/or zinc powder blended in.

The manufaturer's statements about not getting it on the core nose (insulator) is true, but that isn't an issue. All you do is put a thin coat on the threads only. I wipe off any that coats the non threaded end of the plug (the last 2 mm).

As for a torque multiplying effect, their statement is true as well. Spark plug torque specifications are for "dry" threads. I go with the minimum torque recommendation of 15 lbf.ft. for my 14 mm (Bosch W7DC) GS plugs. You won't strip them, trust me. Far too often, people over torque spark plugs. They aren't holding anything on. All they have to do is create a seal and transfer heat...as well as spark of course.
I got this description from the Bel Ray web site. I must admit that I don't use any anti-seize on spark plugs though. I use the assembly lube on other fasteners all the time and I swear by it. On the plugs I just put a drop or two of oil. I've never had a plug seize up on me....ever.

Bel-Ray Assembly Lube is a high performance lubricant with high Molylube solid content. It will prevent galling and seizing under extreme loads and will make removal of frozen fasteners and fittings much easier. The special anti-wear additives will protect and lubricate all metal surfaces from metal-to-metal contact and premature failure. It provides superior corrosion protection from moisture and is unaffected by acids and alkalis. It leaves an impervious coating for long lasting protection.

Eric
'01 R1150GS
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