ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Bikes > GSpot > GS Boxers
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 11-21-2006, 10:36 PM   #1
Kongo OP
Dog's best friend
 
Kongo's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2006
Location: Longmont Colorado
Oddometer: 537
Ice !!

Riding into the foothills a couple weeks back I stopped and carefully backed up when I came up to a patch of ice. (Easy to do when pointed uphill). With lots of cage experience on black ice, I have this fear of my GS suddenly flying out from under me. Until we get deep into winter, snow around here usually starts out wet. By next morning it ends up as snow over ice. So with the night temps almost always below freezing, I ride on sunny days (like today), and cage it when there is any chance of precip. Yet lurking here I sometimes see pictures of a bike on a snowy road. Some of you guys obviously have this worked out. How do you guys do it? Chains? Studded knobbies? Karma?

Really like to hear advice & comments about winter riding. Not about staying warm -- about controlling the bike.

Thanx
Kongo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2006, 11:23 PM   #2
Gumbydave
motorcycle doofus
 
Gumbydave's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2006
Location: So.California
Oddometer: 884
This pass was a little tricky, it was midnite and lots of black ice. I was riding alone enjoying a night ride with an HID,

I know the 525mini-bike is nothing like the BMW 18" wheeler, but snow and ice feels just like white mud to me, it only gets REAL bad when it starts to get over about 2 feet deep and you have to either peg it WFO or get up and paddle, I really miss when I have to leave it running with the tire spinning in a hole, get off and pull it out. Its even more fun when you have to all get together and take turns pushing and pulling. Now those were the days !
last March I rode a 60 mile ride with 8 miles of 2 to 4 feet deep wet drift with ice on the bottom.
The most experience I ever got on a heavy bike in hiway snow was on a '71 750 Honda so I can't really be much help other than I just ride it like it's white mud. I plan to handle it that way on the GS also,if I ever have to, wheel as vertical as possible and keeping the wheels turning as fast as possible to keep the gyro effect up

Gumbydave screwed with this post 11-21-2006 at 11:35 PM
Gumbydave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-22-2006, 01:57 AM   #3
Fast_Boy_Slim
Don't call me Wighty
 
Fast_Boy_Slim's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2006
Location: Isle of Wight, England
Oddometer: 3,046
Hit black Ice on a 550 katana once. One second upright the next sliding down the road watching the bike smash into the bridge i was crossing. My advice pray often
__________________
Go Jane Go

Quote:
Treat your throttle and brakes like a pair of b**bies! You go grabbing them hard and you're going to get slapped. You want to massage them nice and smooth. That way the bike will kiss you. Chris Carr
Fast_Boy_Slim is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-22-2006, 03:21 AM   #4
bush pilot
Beastly Adventurer
 
bush pilot's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2006
Location: Thailand
Oddometer: 2,489
Ice is tricky. I've gone down once on ice. No warning the bike just suddenly came out from under me. Fortunately I was going slow and just a slight bruise on my hip was the only injury. Bike was undamaged. I picked up a vw bug shortly after that for winter driving.
bush pilot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-22-2006, 04:26 AM   #5
The Raven
Banned
 
The Raven's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2006
Location: Off the map,
Oddometer: 4,813
+1 on ice

I was on a #3 road and some logging trucks had packed some wet snow basically into ice. I was gingerly putting along when all of a sudden my back end decided it wanted to lead. Next thing I remember is the bike doing a 180 then me laying it down. I was only doing about 2-3mph so I only suffered a sore ankle inside my riding boots.

Not a good feeling on a 500lb bike. Though I did learn the term outriggers QUICK!!!
The Raven is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-22-2006, 04:57 AM   #6
weems
Oops!
 
Joined: Mar 2006
Location: Aspen, CO
Oddometer: 559
There was a thread on this awhile back that was pretty good. You might check.

Last year I had an xt225 with smallish knobbies. I put little machine screws in the knobs along the edges of the tire--one every third or fourth knob. I would have put more, but my route took me from about 50 yards of gnarly ice to dry pavement for the rest of the ride. The screws worked well. There is a guy in town with a Dakar and another with a KLR and both of them have about three screws in each knob and they do very well. (but crappy on pavement, I bet.)

So that's the problem: you can equip it for ice, but I don't think it's much good like that when you get off the ice, and rarely here in CO do we get all ice.

And, as somebody said, keep an eye out for the ice that lurks in the shadows and the places that never get sun in winter. You can ride across them, but not if you're not prepared.

This year I've got the 12, so I'm just going to avoid it.

Yesterday on was on a little bit of it and the bike was fine when I made sure and kept it upright (no leaning inputs) and the throttle on.

I think it will take more than it looks like it will take, but yeah, when you go down it's very sudden and there's no recovery possible. So if you're on it go way slow.
weems is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-22-2006, 07:08 AM   #7
rideLD
The further the better!
 
rideLD's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2004
Location: Omaha, Nebraska
Oddometer: 5,351
To put it simply ice sucks and most of the time you will go down if you hit it. I ride my GS pretty much year and around and I have learned a few things about avoiding ice.

Temperature has little to do with ice, humidity is the problem.

In the morning look at the windshields of cars parked on the streets. If there is just a little frost, don't worry. If the frost is thick, think about driving. If there is ice on the windshields then you should probably drive.

When riding in conditions where there may be some ice, completely avoid back roads. Only ride where you know lots of cars have been and try to stay in the wheel tracks.

Watch for trucks leaking water and really pay attention to the road surface. Also watch for snow melt running onto the roads.

If you think you see some black ice coming up and you can not go around it make sure the bike is standing straight up and don't touch the brake or the gas. I have made it through over 100 feet of black ice like that without going down. My underwear did not come out as well.

Despite what others will tell you, street tires will offer the most traction on ice. Dual sport tires like Anakees do very well on ice. With knobbies you will go down every time.

The good thing about going down on ice is that the ice is nice and smooth and you will not damage your gear. The bad part is that you will get bruised when you come off and hit the hard ice.

My .02,
__________________
Karl | 2014 BMW R1200GSW Adventure | 2009 BMW G450x

Quote:
Originally Posted by SchizzMan View Post
We pay Motorrad to design weight off the bike then pay TouraTech to bolt it right back on.
rideLD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-22-2006, 11:30 AM   #8
Gumbydave
motorcycle doofus
 
Gumbydave's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2006
Location: So.California
Oddometer: 884
Quote:
Originally Posted by rideLD
To put it simply ice sucks and most of the time you will go down if you hit it. I ride my GS pretty much year and around and I have learned a few things about avoiding ice.

In the morning look at the windshields of cars parked on the streets. If there is just a little frost, don't worry. If the frost is thick, think about driving. If there is ice on the windshields then you should probably drive.

When riding in conditions where there may be some ice, completely avoid back roads. Only ride where you know lots of cars have been and try to stay in the wheel tracks.

Watch for trucks leaking water and really pay attention to the road surface. Also watch for snow melt running onto the roads.

If you think you see some black ice coming up and you can not go around it make sure the bike is standing straight up and don't touch the brake or the gas. I have made it through over 100 feet of black ice like that without going down. My underwear did not come out as well.

Despite what others will tell you, street tires will offer the most traction on ice. Dual sport tires like Anakees do very well on ice. With knobbies you will go down every time.



My .02,
Great advices Karl, Also watch out for sheets of ice flying off the roof of semi trailers on the freeway. As it thaws the whole sheet flys off sometimes, it can happen even when the road is dry and the semi trailer has been parked for a long time with frozen water puddled on the roof
Gumbydave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-22-2006, 10:39 PM   #9
Kongo OP
Dog's best friend
 
Kongo's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2006
Location: Longmont Colorado
Oddometer: 537
Wink

Thanks for the comments. You guys are great.

I kind-of knew that snow is "maybe" ok, but ice is definitely not. The problem is there is sometimes ice under the snow. I had already guessed that dirt (knob) tires are better for snow but not worth a shit on ice. (I have Tourances on my '95 GSA).

Gumbydave, that is a good point about sheets of ice flying off the roof of semi trailers on the freeway. My mental image of that was something like "holy shit, that could slice your head off!!". Stuff also falls of the roofs of ordinary cars and SUVs when they just clean the windshield enough to barely see and drive off.

Sounds like the basic plan is:
- Don't go very fast
- Watch for water sources (trucks leaking, melt, . . .)
- Expect ice in shade (already learned that from cage driving)
- Don't follow too close, stuff might come off roofs
- Wear padding bcuz ya might fall down !!
- Pray (I like that one)

Interesting about the screws. I had not thought of that.

Thanx again for the comments.

- John
Kongo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-22-2006, 10:52 PM   #10
TonyA
beta tester
 
TonyA's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2003
Location: East of Bonneville, North of Moab
Oddometer: 1,159
I've had the same problem on top of the Snowy Range and in the Poudre Canyon. Worst part is when you round a curve and there it is where yesterday's snow melt ran across the patch of road that's shaded all winter. Haven't dropped it yet but I paid a lot of attention to keeping the beast within about 1/10 degree of vertical, no braking, and very light throttle (I don't want to come to a stop on the stuff). At times like that you thank yourself for putting the engine protection bars on 'cuz they'll take what a 5-mph get-off can dish out.
__________________
"A voyage whose two ends were out of sight - a voyage sufficient in itself."

"Master and Commander", Patrick O'Brian
IBA 31991
TonyA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-23-2006, 12:25 AM   #11
richc
Beastly Adventurer
 
richc's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2003
Location: Baja, Motorcycle Heaven
Oddometer: 7,607
I stay off it. Last week I went out for a ride - it was 35 and pretty nice at my place. As I got higher in elevation it cooled off pretty quick and was soon bouncing around 31-33. I'd come up on these shaded sections of road where the surface was shining, I'd ride around or stay in the middle of the lane where the cages had dried it off. I don't like ice, I'd rather ride in snow where I can get some traction. I also choose my routes carefully, I wanted to ride along the river here but it's a road that gets no sun because of the tree cover - I passed on that one.
richc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-23-2006, 08:46 AM   #12
Kongo OP
Dog's best friend
 
Kongo's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2006
Location: Longmont Colorado
Oddometer: 537
Think I'll add to the basic plan: Get some engine protection bars. There are some other threads here about them. I will look around for suggestions.

The GS will be down for a couple weeks next month while I get a new seat (Rick Mayer). Thinking of painting the tank during that time (bubbles on plastic now), and doing some general maintenance. Maybe I can get some protection bars ordered so they can go on at the same time.

Thanx for the ideas.

Everyone have a great holiday. My son is a warehouse manager at Avery Brewery in Boulder. He's not only bringing us lots of really good beer, he is also a far better cook than either of us.
Kongo is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 09:22 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014