ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Bikes > Beasts
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 01-09-2007, 04:43 PM   #1
zed88 OP
n00bilicious
 
zed88's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2006
Location: Pingree grove il nw chicago
Oddometer: 1,297
Performed Valve adjustment dl650 w/many pictures (warning 56k)

Sorry mods if this belongs in gears please move it.

I performed a valve adjustment this weekend on my dl650k5 @ 14500 miles. I also flushed the coolant and synced the throttle bodies, and cleaned up some electrical jobs. It took me about 15 hours to do over 2 days including a trip to get shims. I've never done this before and did quite a bit of reading and took my time to double and triple check everything. Its not nearly as difficult as I thought it would be. It required patience, planning and calm. I've heard lots of people talking about doing it but I'm relatively new to bikes and wanted to see some pictures of the actual process to see what everything was as this has helped me lots in the past with other procedures. Frankly being young I don't have the chance to get into engines the way many older folks do as its just not done nowadays. I hope this helps somebody else out there.

Through the whole process I carefully laid out parts, took notes, and labeled everything. The dealers in the area wanted a ton of money to do it, and frankly I wanted to know that it was actually done and not just glanced at. Plus being in college I don't have a few hundred dollars to get the procedure done.

Carefully laid out parts and my beverage of choice



I removed the radiator. If done properly only 1 connector needs to come undone. I did splash some coolant around.


Front valve cover off and being checked


Pictures of rear valve with covers taken off.


Checking the rear clearances


Taking off a "journal"


Rear cover with "journals" (things on top) taken off


Rear cam's and chain with guard removed


Another angle


Marking on cam gears




What it looks like inside the timing cover with stuff showing


*thread continued below*
zed88 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-2007, 04:44 PM   #2
zed88 OP
n00bilicious
 
zed88's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2006
Location: Pingree grove il nw chicago
Oddometer: 1,297
More shots of the gears with labels


What it looks like underneath the buckets


What a shim looks like like inside a bucket


Cam chain tensioner (front)



The rear cam chain tensioner is a PITA, and was probably the toughest part of the whole job. Its in a horrible position and frankly I don't know what special tool is needed. Here are shots of the location, and what my hands looked like after a hour of screwing around to get it out. This is the only part of the job where I felt frustrated and was cursing Suzuki up and down.






The front exhausts were tight beyond spec and the rear exhaust and intake were on the tight side. Once everything was all shimmed and set it was all on the middle lower end and all match each other. A local dealer traded shims with me for 3 bucks each. The gaskets all sealed up nice and tight (I had spares on hand)

One other useful tip. Don't panic if you get a bit of smoke when you turn on the bike for the first time (assuming you took the time to triple check everything along the way). It's what happens when you drip oil on the exhaust in a couple of places :)

I forgot to say that when accessing the rear cam chain tensioner there is a plastic mud guard just in front of the rear wheel held on by a 12mm bolt. If you remove that you get much greater access to the rear from the side. And if you remove the plastic keeper that holds the rear brake line down like GPlongford mentioned you can actually reach it!

Here are the clearances on the valves before adjustment:

Front Cyclinder (in mm)

Intake .11 and .11 (in spec on tight end)
Exhaust .18 and .18 (out of spec tight)

Rear Cylinder
Intake .11 and .11 (In spec on tight end)
Exhaust .18 and .17 (out of spec tight)

After
I left the intakes as is, and adjusted the exhaust to .22 all around.

Overall I dont feel as though it was too bad, and my guess is that these will pretty much stay the same for a long while. I'll probably check them again in 10k or so, or if I hear any change's. It's much easier to check than it is to change

I took the bike out for a run today after finishing with the cooling system and all is well. I also think the TBS did smooth things out a bit too.

I hope this helps somebody out. Feel free to post if you have any questions. I'll try to answer them to the best of my abilities.

*edit*
Did them again at 42,000 miles and had one front tight intake valve. The whole job was much easier with a bit of practice.

zed88 screwed with this post 02-25-2009 at 11:05 PM
zed88 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2007, 08:07 AM   #3
HarveyMushman
commutingmysentence
 
HarveyMushman's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2002
Location: Virginia, USA
Oddometer: 16,206
Thanks!

Any special trick to proper cam removal and installation? Is the Suzuki shop manual helpful?
__________________
Tim

photo galleries
HarveyMushman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2007, 08:56 AM   #4
ddlewis
squirrel
 
ddlewis's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2004
Location: South/central Va
Oddometer: 1,532
Quote:
Originally Posted by zed88
...I hope this helps somebody out. Feel free to post if you have any questions. I'll try to answer them to the best of my abilities.
Thanks! That does help. I need to check mine. I'm at 20k and have yet to do it.

It seems to me everyone who takes their bike to a shop hears "everythings fine, all within spec", but those who do it themselves end up swapping a few shims.. I'm like you and don't trust dealership mechanics.
ddlewis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2007, 10:18 AM   #5
zed88 OP
n00bilicious
 
zed88's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2006
Location: Pingree grove il nw chicago
Oddometer: 1,297
Its far to easy for the dealership to say the work is done, or even to just check the valves and make sure that they won't blow up anytime soon and then pocket all your money. I'm sure plenty of shops do a good job, but I either want to see the work done in front of my face, or have it done by somebody I trust.

As far as Cam removal it's pretty much by the book, although for the rear cam chain tensioner its much easier to access if you remove the 2 plastic guards in back. I dident run into anything that wasnt covered by the manual well, except the fact that you need to read ALL the directions in advance, because some things like turning your wrench counterclockwise to rotate the engine are not covered until after you've already done it If I had to do this job again and had the shims on hand I think I could be done in 5 hours pretty easily going at a relaxed pace. It'll be alot easier the second time around. Dont hurry to much though as you DO NOT want to strip any of these bolts. They all screw into very expensive blocks of metal :)
zed88 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2007, 10:50 AM   #6
westnash
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: May 2004
Location: Phoenix, AZ
Oddometer: 3,246
Great report. Are you sayiong your bike has 56,000 miles and this is the first time they have been checked?
westnash is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2007, 10:55 AM   #7
HarveyMushman
commutingmysentence
 
HarveyMushman's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2002
Location: Virginia, USA
Oddometer: 16,206
Quote:
Originally Posted by zed88
As far as Cam removal it's pretty much by the book, although for the rear cam chain tensioner its much easier to access if you remove the 2 plastic guards in back. I dident run into anything that wasnt covered by the manual well, except the fact that you need to read ALL the directions in advance, because some things like turning your wrench counterclockwise to rotate the engine are not covered until after you've already done it If I had to do this job again and had the shims on hand I think I could be done in 5 hours pretty easily going at a relaxed pace. It'll be alot easier the second time around. Dont hurry to much though as you DO NOT want to strip any of these bolts. They all screw into very expensive blocks of metal :)
Thanks. This weekend I swapped out the air filter and while I had the tank off I kinda poked around a little with the manual in hand. I'm glad you mention the crank rotation; the manual says it's important to rotate it in the direction it spins while running, but doesn't tell you which way that is! I assumed it was probably counterclockwise since that is "forward" and backward-rotating cranks are pretty rare. Anyway, thanks. This little job is not too far down the road for me.
__________________
Tim

photo galleries
HarveyMushman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2007, 11:29 AM   #8
duckrider
Studly Adventurer
 
duckrider's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2004
Location: Southwest Orygun
Oddometer: 993
Thanks, nice report with good pics. One thing I've found helpful is to do a thorough scrub on the bike after the tank and plastic is removed. Not only is it nicer to work on, it helps eliminate little chunks of dirt falling into the motor when you brush against the frame or other parts. I also keep shop rags covering any open area that I'm not actively working on.

I've got 10k on my DL so a check is coming up soon. Thanks for the pics!
duckrider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2007, 03:53 PM   #9
zed88 OP
n00bilicious
 
zed88's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2006
Location: Pingree grove il nw chicago
Oddometer: 1,297
Keep in mind I am not a professional mechanic but just a student who like to learn new things My time is not currently worth more than 45-50$ and hour even when doing computer consulting, so I do things like this to stay ahead. Plus It'll be a lot easier the 5 times they'll need to be checked. My bike had 14,479 miles when I performed this adjustment.
I would also advise changing the air filter, spark plugs, brake fluid and coolant while doing this operation since its all very accessible.
zed88 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2007, 04:57 PM   #10
westnash
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: May 2004
Location: Phoenix, AZ
Oddometer: 3,246
So as I understand it at 14.5K miles you had 2 vlaves that were too tight and the others at the tight end of normal range. How does this compare to others with 650 stroms?
westnash is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2007, 06:45 PM   #11
duckrider
Studly Adventurer
 
duckrider's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2004
Location: Southwest Orygun
Oddometer: 993
Quote:
Originally Posted by wickedsprint
Goodness, your pics while no doubt seriously helpful to shim users, remind me why I like screw adjusters, I can do my XR650R in like 20 minutes, same with my quad...holy shit..5 hours??? I would likely take the lazy approach with a shim bike..run it till it dies..then yank the head and fix what's needed LOL
There's something to be said for 80's technology. Actually my KTM also has screw adjusters. Just did the valves on my DRZ and it didn't take much longer to do the valves than it did to ride to town, pick up new shims and ride back.
duckrider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2007, 07:00 PM   #12
strommin
bending light
 
strommin's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2005
Location: Smith Mtn Lake, VA
Oddometer: 938
zed88

Thanks for the write up and pix.
Creates a very helpful reference.

Quote:
Originally Posted by westnash
So as I understand it at 14.5K miles you had 2 valves that were too tight and the others at the tight end of normal range. How does this compare to others with 650 stroms?
Had mine checked at 16K and all valves were within spec. Getting ready to do it again in a few weeks with almost 33K on the odometer.

Dave
strommin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2007, 07:09 PM   #13
mp183
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Jan 2005
Location: Northern NJ and Northern Adirondacks
Oddometer: 310
Damn, those pics scare me.
Almost 32,000 on mine and have not checked yet.
My riding buddy has almost 50,000 on his and checked twice.
Last time at somewhere near 30,000 and they were
within spec.
I promise to check mine soon as I get back from my winter ride.
NJ to Arizona sounds nice.
__________________
2004 DL650
2002 GS500
2004 KLR250
mp183 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2007, 02:17 PM   #14
moto_potato
n00b
 
Joined: Jan 2007
Oddometer: 1
Just did the same job last weekend myself. At 19K miles, 6 of my 8 valves were out of spec. I agree about the rear cam chain tensioner being the worst part. Here's a shortcut for that: After removing the cap bolt and spring from the cam chain tensioner, use a narrow screwdriver to reach in from above and release the ratcheting mechanism of the tensioner. If you do this, you need only loosen the tensioner mounting bolts a few turn to get adequate chain slack to R&R the cams without having to completely remove the tensioner unit. For access to the tensioner bolts, a hex driver socket on a swivel adapter with ~2 feet of socket extensions make the job much easier.
Cheers,
Paul
moto_potato is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2007, 08:36 AM   #15
wacky_woodchuck
Banned
 
wacky_woodchuck's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2003
Location: Cleveland, OH
Oddometer: 230
My SV was tight at 15,000 miles as well. I had to replace all my exhaust shims to get it back in spec.

I ended up making my own cam chain tool. I took a huge fender washer and ground it down to make a holding tool. It basically looks like a mushroom with a small/narrow stem. the stem holds the spring back in so you can attach the tensioner or leave it on and do the valve check. I've replaced the cams in 3 SV's now and I have never once got done with out swearing.

I'm sure you guys know this already... but if you were to take a Gen 2 SV intake cam and put it as your intakes and then take a Gen 1 Intake cam and put it on the exhaust side...you'll be much happier. Here's my gains on a 2000 SV. Same jetting/exhaust/filter as before, just different cams.

wacky_woodchuck is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 07:52 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014