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Old 01-17-2007, 02:04 PM   #1
strsout OP
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Catalytic converters. Can I remove it?

Is there a problem removing the catalytic converter on a 2003 GS?
Have you done it?
What is involved?
I ear that if you remove it, you don't have to worry about lead/unlead gas.
Also I would guess about 5 pounds less on the bike.

Thank you
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Old 01-17-2007, 02:14 PM   #2
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Check out this link;http://www.advrider.com/forums/showt...ytic+converter

I would and did get rid of mine. I used a Remus y-pipe and can. Good stuff.

Grizzy.
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Old 01-17-2007, 03:03 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GrizzyBear
Check out this link;http://www.advrider.com/forums/showt...ytic+converter

I would and did get rid of mine. I used a Remus y-pipe and can. Good stuff.

Grizzy.
A lot of disagreement there :) :)
I guess I got one good info about Sebring Y-Pipe. Looks like that would be the way to go.

Now, for those who removed the catalytic converter:
1) is there any increase in noise?
2) is there any increase in consumption?

Those are two things I don't want, so I'm not sure if it's a good idea or not to remove the catalytic.
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Old 01-17-2007, 04:09 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by strsout
A lot of disagreement there :) :)
I guess I got one good info about Sebring Y-Pipe. Looks like that would be the way to go.

Now, for those who removed the catalytic converter:
1) is there any increase in noise?
2) is there any increase in consumption?

Those are two things I don't want, so I'm not sure if it's a good idea or not to remove the catalytic.
Hi,

A catalytic converter is just a device that treats the exhaust before it leaves the engine and removes a lot of the pollutants now being attributed to global warming etc. etc. (different debate so let's not go there). Legislation in Europe is primarily responsible for all BMW (and other Euro brand) motorcycles being equipped at manufacture with catalytic converters these days.

Your bike is equipped with a three-way catalytic converter. "Three-way" refers to the three regulated emissions it helps to reduce -- carbon monoxide, VOCs and NOx molecules. The converter uses two different types of catalysts, a reduction catalyst and an oxidation catalyst. Both types consist of a ceramic structure coated with a metal catalyst, usually platinum, rhodium and/or palladium. The idea is to create a structure that exposes the maximum surface area of catalyst to the exhaust stream, while also minimizing the amount of catalyst required (they are very expensive).

The reduction catalyst is the first stage of the catalytic converter. It uses platinum and rhodium to help reduce the NOx emissions. When an NO or NO2 molecule contacts the catalyst, the catalyst rips the nitrogen atom out of the molecule and holds on to it, freeing the oxygen in the form of O2. The nitrogen atoms bond with other nitrogen atoms that are also stuck to the catalyst, forming N2.


The oxidation catalyst is the second stage of the catalytic converter. It reduces the unburned hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide by burning (oxidizing) them over a platinum and palladium catalyst. This catalyst aids the reaction of the CO and hydrocarbons with the remaining oxygen in the exhaust gas.

The third stage is a control system that monitors the exhaust stream, and uses this information to control the fuel injection system. There is an oxygen sensor mounted upstream of the catalytic converter, meaning it is closer to the engine than the converter is. This sensor tells the engine computer how much oxygen is in the exhaust. The engine computer can increase or decrease the amount of oxygen in the exhaust by adjusting the air-to-fuel ratio. This control scheme allows the engine computer to make sure that the engine is running at close to the stoichiometric point, and also to make sure that there is enough oxygen in the exhaust to allow the oxidization catalyst to burn the unburned hydrocarbons and CO.

So, if the environment is not your primary concern, unbolt your exhaust and part with it - the catalytic converter is inside. The amount of noise you get will depend on the pipe your replace the original with, most manufacturers of aftermarket pipes give you a dB rating usually around 88 or thereabouts with some for of restictor so as to keep you legal on the road.

Fuel consumption should not change a lot as the oxygen sensor mounted further forward on the header system is still using information to control the fuel injection system and the amount you burn.

Hope that helps.
Garry
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Old 01-17-2007, 04:35 PM   #5
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Laugh

........... shit !!!! I thought I knew how those things worked, and I did know ...... I just forgot about their importance. I thought I would bin mine on the next bike, but I might think about it a bit more. I mean the environment is important ...... thats where we live and ride. It is, however, an argument to keep the cat and can the can. Air pollution is more tangible than noise pollution ........ maybe rip it out anyway, and be more ethical in other areas. I will start by leaving my cat on, until I start looking for ponies. Thanks for reminding me of the wonders of catalytic converters.
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Old 01-17-2007, 06:39 PM   #6
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WHAT THE HELL IS WRONG WITH A NOISY BOXER????THEY SOUND BEUTIFULLLLLL,,,just ask the sport bikes that are usually looking at the back of my carbon akrapovic
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Old 01-17-2007, 06:41 PM   #7
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consider leaving the cat and replacing the can...I've done this, I've got better sound and a bit more power, plus the benefits of the cat.
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Old 01-18-2007, 08:35 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NZGSer


So, if the environment is not your primary concern, unbolt your exhaust and part with it - the catalytic converter is inside. The amount of noise you get will depend on the pipe your replace the original with, most manufacturers of aftermarket pipes give you a dB rating usually around 88 or thereabouts with some for of restictor so as to keep you legal on the road.

Fuel consumption should not change a lot as the oxygen sensor mounted further forward on the header system is still using information to control the fuel injection system and the amount you burn.

Hope that helps.
Garry
It does help. A long explanation on what it does.
Environment is a concern for me, yes (I still separating trash in 3 different bins), but I will be using this bike to a long trip overseas and some people alert me about the fact that unleaded gas maybe not available there, and that it could cause a problem.
I'm not planning to replace the pipe, unless there is a related reason for it (I don't want more noise, neiter more power from the pipe).

Thank you again :)
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Old 01-18-2007, 08:58 AM   #9
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I have an '03. Axe the Cat. You'll love it. No heater, big weight loss. I tried to replace just the cat with a Staintune collector box but it does not work with any muffler but Satintune. The OEM and a Remus Canister both hit the saddle bag. The Staintune muffler does not hit the bag but it does direct the exhaust higher up into the license plate and turn signal creating a heat issue.
I reccommend Remus Y-pipe and muffler. I actually switch from the Remus can to the Staintune when I use the left side saddlebag, but run the Remus most of the time because of the heat issue.
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Old 01-18-2007, 09:02 AM   #10
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Someone mention that I could jut open the OEM pipes and remove the catalyc from inside?
is that true?
If I don't want change the pipe, would that be a quickly and cheap solution?
How difficult would be to remove the cat from that OEM pipes w/o damaging the whole thing?

Ramus pipe is much lighter then the OEM pipe? and how about noise? and price?

Thank you
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Old 01-18-2007, 09:02 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by strsout
I ear that if you remove it, you don't have to worry about lead/unlead gas.
Leaded gas will destroy your O2 sensor which is needed for the fuel injection system.
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Old 01-18-2007, 09:04 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jlnance
Leaded gas will destroy your O2 sensor which is needed for the fuel injection system.
So how one will ride in countries where only leaded gas is available?

Is then better to keep the cat and take chances?
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Old 01-18-2007, 10:01 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NZGSer
Hi,

A catalytic converter is just a device that treats the exhaust before it leaves the engine and removes a lot of the pollutants now being attributed to global warming etc. etc.
Wow. Great info, Garry. Thanks!

Do you know how much NO and unburnt hydrocarbons typically come out of these bikes? I'm trying to rationalize the cat from a global warming perspective. Is the fraction of NO or NO2 molecules in the exhaust even close to the fraction of CO2? If it's many orders of magnitude lower (which would be my guess), then I don't see the point of the cat. Even if they do have a larger global warming potential per molecule than CO2. (aah, the neat info you can find on wiki!)
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Old 01-18-2007, 12:16 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sabasilo
Wow. Great info, Garry. Thanks!

Do you know how much NO and unburnt hydrocarbons typically come out of these bikes? I'm trying to rationalize the cat from a global warming perspective. Is the fraction of NO or NO2 molecules in the exhaust even close to the fraction of CO2? If it's many orders of magnitude lower (which would be my guess), then I don't see the point of the cat. Even if they do have a larger global warming potential per molecule than CO2. (aah, the neat info you can find on wiki!)
The main by-products of combustion are:

Nitrogen gas (N2): Our atmosphere is 78 percent nitrogen gas, and most of this passes right through your engine.

Carbon Dioxide (CO2): A harmless, odourless gas composed of carbon and oxygen. It is also a greenhouse gas that contributes to global warming.

Water vapour (H2O): Another by-product of combustion. The hydrogen in the fuel bonds with the oxygen in the air.

These three emissions are mostly harmless, although carbon dioxide emissions are believed to contribute to global warming. However since the combustion process is never perfect, other more harmful emissions are produced in the process.

The three main regulated emissions, and also the ones that catalytic converters are designed to reduce, are:



Carbon monoxide (CO): A colourless, odourless gas. It is poisonous and extremely dangerous in confined areas, building up slowly to toxic levels without warning if adequate ventilation is not available.


Hydrocarbons or volatile organic compounds (VOCs): Any chemical compound made up of hydrogen and carbon.

Oxides of nitrogen (NOx): Chemical compounds of nitrogen, they combine with hydrocarbons to produce smog.

In order to reduce emissions, modern engines carefully control the amount of fuel they burn. They try to keep the air-to-fuel ratio very close to what is called the stoichiometric point, which is the calculated ideal ratio of air to fuel.

Theoretically, at this ratio, all of the fuel will be burned using all of the oxygen in the air. For petrol engines the stoichiometric ratio is about 14.7:1. This means that for every litre of petrol, 14.7 litres of air will be burned. As engine and driving conditions change, this ratio changes as well. Sometimes it will run richer or leaner than the ideal 14.7:1.

You can work it out if you have loads of spare time but the short answer is that if alll of the fuel is burned using all of the available oxygen in the air/fule mix then your bike's catalytic converter does a very good job of removing most of the regulated emissions, BMW claim up to 95% reduction in total emmisons with the use of a converter against an engine without one.

Whew!!

Cheers
Garry
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Old 01-18-2007, 12:44 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jlnance
Leaded gas will destroy your O2 sensor which is needed for the fuel injection system.

leaded gas destroys the converter chemistry, I don't think it has an effect on the O2 sensor.
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