ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Gear > Equipment
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 01-30-2007, 08:56 PM   #16
turbonotch
Studly Adventurer
 
Joined: Apr 2004
Location: Vincentown, NJ
Oddometer: 735
i've done ALOT of motorcycle camping. weight is an issue - but more importantly space! i've got a setup that works out well.... is very light... and will support 90% of situations i could get into, but it is very tall and cumbersome!

for lightweight camping, OFFROAD - i needed to keep it basic and accept that you'll only be able to travel for a limited amount of time and in a limited climate range.

in my case, a long weekend over 40 degrees, with one change of clothes... basically a decent sleeping bag under a tarp slung from the bike.

the lightest i can travel without making the bike unreasonable for navigating single track.
__________________
Current Bikes:
*2003 KTM 250EXC - 'SJER/ECEA bike' **2003 KTM 300EXC - 'Rock Bike' **1999 YZ125/500cc hybrid - 'Adrenaline' **1992 DR350S - 'day tripper' **1978 YZ400 - 'Vintage Big Bore **1981 Kawasaki KL250 - 'Dad's' **1979 Yamaha MX100 - 'lost & found'
turbonotch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-30-2007, 09:06 PM   #17
SteveBroskey
Teach me this knowledge
 
SteveBroskey's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2006
Location: Rochester, NY
Oddometer: 541
Gas?

My question (since it's been a dream of mine to actually get off my butt and do this) is how do you handle fuel? It just seems like I'd run out after the first day. (Given I don't have an extra-large tank, but even for some of the Dakar equipped KLRs - don't you ride far enough for it to run out?
SteveBroskey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-30-2007, 09:11 PM   #18
dwrads
Right Wristed
 
dwrads's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2005
Location: Orange County California
Oddometer: 488
Light weight

The trick to ultra light is to take less. My basic set up for camping in the west is a 30 degree Marmot Hydrogen sleeping bag, (weighs 1 pound and packs down to the size of a loaf of bread) a 1/4 inch thick cheap insulite pad, (1/2 pound rolls up very small) and a Golite Cave 2 tarp tent if theres a chance of rain (1 pound packs down 1/2 the size of the sleeping bag). No stove but a small tea pot for making hot water for coffee tea etc, (3-4 ounces) a partial roll of aluminum foil for cooking in a fire, or just take cold food purchased at the last gas stop. All this goes in a backpack.

The tarp I use is big enough for 3 people to get under if neccesary. The expensive thing is the Marmot sleeping bag ($300). But like most things you get what you pay for, all Marmot stuff is guarrantied for life. When it starts to get thin just send it back and Marmot will refill the down to original specs. I've sent 15 year old bags with thousands of nights spent in them back and they were restored to new condition for free.


This is the most loaded pack I've every carried on the bike. 1.5 gallons extra gas, 1 gal of water. about three days of food maybe 10 pounds. The actual camping gear 3 pounds.


Foil cooking prep.



Sleeping bag and pad.

DW
__________________
The hell with the long way around, take the hard way across.
dwrads is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-30-2007, 09:55 PM   #19
turbonotch
Studly Adventurer
 
Joined: Apr 2004
Location: Vincentown, NJ
Oddometer: 735
Quote:
Originally Posted by SteveBroskey
My question (since it's been a dream of mine to actually get off my butt and do this) is how do you handle fuel? It just seems like I'd run out after the first day. (Given I don't have an extra-large tank, but even for some of the Dakar equipped KLRs - don't you ride far enough for it to run out?
planning.

if you have a bike that is set up specifically for long-distance backcountry trips... your range could be up to 500 miles.

but through a larger or auxillary tank... 200-250miles is reasonable.

beyond that, plan a route that will intersect towns where fuel will be available.
__________________
Current Bikes:
*2003 KTM 250EXC - 'SJER/ECEA bike' **2003 KTM 300EXC - 'Rock Bike' **1999 YZ125/500cc hybrid - 'Adrenaline' **1992 DR350S - 'day tripper' **1978 YZ400 - 'Vintage Big Bore **1981 Kawasaki KL250 - 'Dad's' **1979 Yamaha MX100 - 'lost & found'
turbonotch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-30-2007, 10:31 PM   #20
Blue Man
Adventurer
 
Joined: Jan 2005
Location: Oakhills/Phelan California
Oddometer: 63
dwrads,
Where was that first picture taken?

Do any of you guys use the backpacking food, dehydrated?

What bike gets 200-250 miles, I can only get about 100 miles with a 4.3 gal tank on a XR 650r.

This would be fun to do, except for the food part, I need substance.
Blue Man is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-30-2007, 11:49 PM   #21
Wayne Weber
why are we stopping?
 
Joined: Aug 2003
Location: Golden CO
Oddometer: 3,854
Here's our set up for 2 up camping. It all fits in 2 Jesse's, no strapped on stuff.



Main points:

1lb Western Mountaineering down bags
1lb Thermarest (ultralite 48")
no stove etc.
Mountain hardware Hammerhead II tent. 7lbs but it works great.
Teva's for town/camp shoes.

I could pack lighter, but this works.
__________________
Wayne

04 KTM 950 S
93 KTM 550
93 XT225 Adventure Serow!
00 Weber Rally Twin (www.rallytwin.com)
Gas Gas 270
2 Waterbuffalo's (Sold!)
Wayne Weber is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-31-2007, 08:43 AM   #22
tbirdsp
REMF
 
tbirdsp's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2002
Location: Nebraska
Oddometer: 8,731
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blue Man
dwrads,

What bike gets 200-250 miles, I can only get about 100 miles with a 4.3 gal tank on a XR 650r.
Holy cow, 25 MPG?!
My DRZ would go 200+ miles with a Clarke 3.9
Haven't ridden my KLR much yet, but I think it will get 40 MPG at the worst and it has a 6.1 gal tank.
__________________
Mike S.
'09 Bonneville Black, '05 KLR650, '07 Yam Majesty
AMA MSTA
http://www.reddeliciousband.com
tbirdsp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2007, 12:27 PM   #23
dwrads
Right Wristed
 
dwrads's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2005
Location: Orange County California
Oddometer: 488
Hey Blueman the first picture is in Baja near Mikes Sky rancho.

I almsot never use prepackaged dehydrated food. Tastes like crap and isn't all that great for you. When moto camping we often get food at the last gas stop/town. Fresh food is best though it weighs more, but since I plan on consuming it soon after purchase it's worth the weight. There should never be a problem gatting and having enough substance. Fresh food can include a steak or whatever! We use the foil cooking with tortillas and salsa alot becauseit's easy. No equipment required, as long as your in a where you can have a fire.

As for range it all depends on were your trying to get/go. Multiple days without gas is pretty hard to do. I doubt that most need the 300+ mile range some here have been discussing. With my XRR the farthest I've gone between food and gas is 1 1/2 days and 300 miles. Yes the packs were heavy but not for long. Just get out there with what you have and don't be afraid to get by with less.

One more good thing about a lightweight approach to camping, it's easier to camp just about anywhere and the impact to the site is much lower. Of course different parts of the country have different limitations to what you can do.

DW
__________________
The hell with the long way around, take the hard way across.
dwrads is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2007, 05:58 PM   #24
ditchbanker
Owner of dull user line
 
ditchbanker's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2006
Location: Idaho-Beneath the smell of sugarbeats
Oddometer: 1,143
I'm going to throw out some wisdom from the voice of inexperience. I tried my first camping trip last weekend and learned just a couple things that I hope I can save another inexperienced rider from experiencing.
First, don't push the limits of your sleeping bag. 5 degrees + 20 degree sleeping bag=frostbite+no sleep.
Second thing: I tried to be cheap by packing all of my equipment on the bike rack in a giant duffel bag. Plus the fact that I had some stuff I didn't need (giant freaking tarp chief among my space wasting) made the handling terrible. On paved corners, it leaned way sharper than I intended, on dirt it made the riding way inferior. I had to be concerned about what the load was doing on whoops, wondering if I was stressing my sub frame, etc. I'm going to be getting some real luggage so that I don't have to stop and address those things as much. Get the weight low.
__________________
"I can't think of a single unmemorable camping trip we've had."

--Heath
ditchbanker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2007, 06:28 PM   #25
rapiti
IOR Veteran
 
rapiti's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2003
Location: On the island
Oddometer: 1,897
Quote:
Originally Posted by ditchbanker
First, don't push the limits of your sleeping bag. 5 degrees + 20 degree sleeping bag=frostbite+no sleep.
That's when you carefully select a rock from the fire, wrap it in your shittiest garment, so it doesn't melt your bag, and warm your toes back up.



...Or there's that cowboy movie technique

Quote:
Originally Posted by ditchbanker
Get the weight low.
Yup
__________________
...its the best paint scheme that has ever been or ever will be on an Adv...-AussieRob
rapiti is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2007, 06:35 PM   #26
ditchbanker
Owner of dull user line
 
ditchbanker's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2006
Location: Idaho-Beneath the smell of sugarbeats
Oddometer: 1,143
Quote:
Originally Posted by rapiti
That's when you carefully select a rock from the fire, wrap it in your shittiest garment, so it doesn't melt your bag, and warm your toes back up.



...Or there's that cowboy movie technique

Yup
I had tossed a pair of grip warmers in my pocket before I left. I put those between sock layers and I think that kept the 'bite to a minimum. Trust me, by the time my feet were that cold, the rocks from the fire were downright frosty.
__________________
"I can't think of a single unmemorable camping trip we've had."

--Heath
ditchbanker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2007, 07:31 PM   #27
GaM
Beastly Adventurer
 
GaM's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2004
Oddometer: 1,877
Small Ti Pot and everthiing small fits in it such as pocket rocket stove, stainless steel cup, small led headlamp, pocket knife, tea, coffee, bandanna; Big Agnes SL2 - 3lb. 6.0 oz (fly, pole, body); Western Mountaineering Megalite bag - 1 b. 8 oz.; old 3/4 length close celled foam Cascade designs pad- don't know but it's about a light as you can get. I don't like it because of the volume, and volume is a bigger problem than weight. I have a big Agnes Aircore pad, which has a very low packed volume, but mine has a super small leak which I can't find. I put the (**& thing in the bath tub and can't find a bubble trail the leak is so small. I blow it up at night and it's flat when I wake up in the morning. I was using a Bibler Anawahnee that I have many many years and spent hundreds of nights in all over the country. The zippers finally gave out, it is still perfectly water proof, they said replacing the zippers would proababy cost as much as a new one. I'll probably get another Bibler, its give a great feeling of security that no matter how bad things get, it's not going to come in on you. That brown bag next to the water bottles is an MRE, I buy them by the case.
GaM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2007, 09:27 PM   #28
SteveBroskey
Teach me this knowledge
 
SteveBroskey's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2006
Location: Rochester, NY
Oddometer: 541
Quote:
Originally Posted by GaM
that looks glorious
SteveBroskey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2007, 09:36 PM   #29
Beezer
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Oct 2004
Location: Anchorage, formerly Spenard (hub of the universe)
Oddometer: 5,540
Yeah, what DWRADS said about food. Most bike trips involve plenty of road, so eat before you hit the trail & plan on buy a can of soup before you leave the road. Yeah, I usually carry Rycrisp, Fig Newtons, gorp, etc and I always take my stove & coffee pot (and a flask of Bushmills) no need to be uncivilized.

I also try to have enough gas to do what I want no worries, and not carry any extra. A half tank on the KLR is more fuel (weight) that a lot other bikes have when full.
Beezer is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2007, 10:29 PM   #30
Doghouse_Riley
Wannabe Adventure Tourer
 
Doghouse_Riley's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2006
Location: The Second, CA
Oddometer: 2,019
Quote:
Originally Posted by cauldron
Ray Jardine has all the answers. Very light weight stuff (8 Lbs. without water!) Most of his stuff can be homemade without a lot of skills or tools (sewing machine maybe..) and most is available commercially if you just want to buy it.

I use a Hennessey Hammock and a 2 pound sleeping bag. I have a 1 pound Ny-Sil tarp for the lighter trips. I made a .5 Oz Stove and aluminum mess kits are good.
I've incorporated Jardine's philosophy into my backpacking and by extension it'll be part of my adventure motorcycling. As it pertains to motorcycling I believe that two things are paramount: 1) ditch the tent and get a tarp and 2) ditch the sleeping bag and get a quilt. Alternatively I say ditch the tent and get a Hennesy hammock and ditch the sleeping bag for a Big Agness sleep system. Tent and sleeping bag are two of the heaviest and bulkiest items and will have the biggest effect on scaling down your camping setup.

The next thing I plan on trying is a coke can stove so I can retire my MSR Whisperlight.
__________________
Ciao
Doghouse

Canis meus id comedit.
Doghouse_Riley is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 02:18 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014