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Old 06-14-2013, 06:59 AM   #6556
8lives
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Location: Shasta County,Calif
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DaymienRules View Post
I remember being concerned about the switch to efi. Then I bought an efi wr. Things I've had to mess with on the efi bike:zero. Things I've had to mess with on carbed bike: stuck float-pissing fuel, sand grain in pilot jet, stripped phillips screw heads, jetting forums, checking the plug, cold starting fun..you get the picture. I'll take the remote chance of a dead failure over the slow nagging issues all day, every day. The old mentality of "I want to be able to fix it anywhere" goes hand in hand with a bike that needs to be fixed.
I think you are right,able to fix it anywhere hand in hand with needs to be fixed,I need to repeat that over and over and get over it,that's whyI like being able to post and get good feed back from the world here,and quit acting like I live in Cuba trying to keep a 1950's car going!!LOL
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Old 06-14-2013, 10:28 AM   #6557
DaymienRules
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tshelver View Post

Both are engineered to suit 3rd world conditions. As such, I need a fairly limited set of tools to perform most jobs compared to the bigger bikes I rode in the US. Plus they are relatively easy for a roadside mechanic to maintain, repair and modify.
I've seen pics of these sorts of places on other ride reports, but am always curious, what kind of tool setups do these guys really have? Is it just like; pliers, hammer, and random bucket of bolts? Or can you expect to find a ratchet set, torx drives, snap ring pliers, a grinder...
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Old 06-14-2013, 10:44 AM   #6558
Earthscape
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 8lives View Post
I think I need a change,KLR is just to big,it is my favorite all round bike Ive owned to date,But the KLX250 is looking pretty good,I really can't spring for a WR250,Im still a little uneasy about FI as the WR and the CRF have so the KLX is whats fitting the program at the moment and there seems to be a bunch of goodies available.Any thoughts??
Keep the KLR, choose any of the 250s, KLX, WRR, CRF, XT, and you'll likely be happiest. As flexible as the KLR650 is, there are places where a 250 would be more fun, and as fun as the 250s are, there are places where the KLR will make you happier. Having both means you're that much closer to having the right tool for whatever it is you want to do that day. And still having the KLR, any shortcomings of the particular 250 that you choose will seem much less significant.
I know some people aren't in a position to have more than one bike, but if you can swing it, it's the way to go until someone makes a 50 HP, 270 lb., dual-range 7-speed transmission dual-sport that requires nothing but easy oil changes for 20,000 miles.
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Old 06-14-2013, 05:00 PM   #6559
tshelver
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DaymienRules View Post
I've seen pics of these sorts of places on other ride reports, but am always curious, what kind of tool setups do these guys really have? Is it just like; pliers, hammer, and random bucket of bolts? Or can you expect to find a ratchet set, torx drives, snap ring pliers, a grinder...
Forget torx drives, snap ring pliers, or even a ratchet set in many cases. Usually they will make do with a few Y sockets, or if they have a ratchet set, they just have a few commonly used sizes.
The better shops will have a grinder, as they are always bodging stuff to fit.

And what they have is usually bought for a few dollars at the local discount shop, straight from China. Some of them fit quite well, lots don't.
When the mechanic is only making $5 a day, the SnapOn truck isn't going to make many stops...

The dealer couldn't even adjust the preload on my shock. No shock ring spanner, and they didn't even have a big enough hammer to move it more than two clicks, hammering on a big screwdriver.

If you go to the two biggest cities, you can likely find a shop that can service imported 'big' bikes (250cc counts as big). But not anywhere on the island I'm on, the second biggest in the country.

Back to the EFI thing:
I'm very much in favor of EFI, in the first world.
In most cases, EFI goes along with other complexity, and in the third world forget trying to find basic parts or the tools to remove them for anything outside of the bikes sold there.

I was considering shipping my TE610E or VFR across, but I would have also needed a full set of spares and tools to maintain them.

The Husky I already had everything needed to strip the motor, but ultimately it's just easier to go with a local bike, most of which are 100cc to 150cc, with 125cc to 175cc 'business' bikes.

I would hardly ever be able to safely use the power, as the other traffic isn't expecting vehicles moving much faster than 50mph, and will overtake on blind corners and rises with that expectation in mind.

A bigger or faster bike doesn't buy you much, and has some significant downsides. There are a fair number of bigger imported bikes here, KTM, BMW, Ducati and others all have a dealer in the capital, and most of the Japanese manufacturers import a limited range of bigger bikes, but I've never seen one outside of the city or off the major paved roads. There are a few people using 250cc to 450cc enduros for fun (mostly expats) but I've not come across one yet.

Lots of the informal infrastructure is built around light sub-200 cc bikes. I've been in many places where the only access is via these small motorcycles, they transport everything on them or else buffalo. Sometimes there may have been a bridge, but when they get damaged, they will be repaired using a few planks, which I reckon a heavily loaded GS will break. Or they will just develop a ford and muscle the bikes through.

After Christmas, I went to visit a friend on a fairly big island that is only connected via banca, about 4 boats a day.
Getting my 200cc Chinabike down over the curbs and down the gang plank (at most 30" wide with a railing on one side) was as much the porters could handle. I reckon a GS or even a KLR would be very risky to load.
The whole bike got completely drenched with seawater on the way over as it was lashed to the railing with no protection.

Stripping down a simple, basic bike after that to clean it is way easier than one of the more complex modern marvels.

Add on bad or dirty gas, much rougher roads, and all the other challenges, and even today's ultra reliable machinery can pick up problems.


Sent from my Android chinaphone, please excuse the spelling
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Old 06-14-2013, 09:24 PM   #6560
8lives
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Earthscape View Post
Keep the KLR, choose any of the 250s, KLX, WRR, CRF, XT, and you'll likely be happiest. As flexible as the KLR650 is, there are places where a 250 would be more fun, and as fun as the 250s are, there are places where the KLR will make you happier. Having both means you're that much closer to having the right tool for whatever it is you want to do that day. And still having the KLR, any shortcomings of the particular 250 that you choose will seem much less significant.
I know some people aren't in a position to have more than one bike, but if you can swing it, it's the way to go until someone makes a 50 HP, 270 lb., dual-range 7-speed transmission dual-sport that requires nothing but easy oil changes for 20,000 miles.
I can afford 2 bikes but I drive myself nuts trying to play with them and work on them,for the most part when Im working Im only home 1 or 2 days a week so over time instead of having 2 bikes I just keep 1 until I tire of it and move on,the R6 I have is actually my sons and I am not a sport bike guy at all.I often use the theory of the best and cheapest bike is the 1 I currently have,but that ain't no fun damn I want my cake too.
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Old 06-14-2013, 09:53 PM   #6561
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very kewl a lot of adds to the thread, just like I asked for.. I'm riding the klx all weekend, finally got all my major spring/summer crap outa the way. I'l take some pics, but I suck at uploading 'em. To those that do-thank u.
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Old 06-15-2013, 07:11 AM   #6562
Earthscape
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tshelver View Post
Forget torx drives, snap ring pliers, or even a ratchet set in many cases. Usually they will make do with a few Y sockets, or if they have a ratchet set, they just have a few commonly used sizes.
The better shops will have a grinder, as they are always bodging stuff to fit.

And what they have is usually bought for a few dollars at the local discount shop, straight from China. Some of them fit quite well, lots don't.
When the mechanic is only making $5 a day, the SnapOn truck isn't going to make many stops...

The dealer couldn't even adjust the preload on my shock. No shock ring spanner, and they didn't even have a big enough hammer to move it more than two clicks, hammering on a big screwdriver.

If you go to the two biggest cities, you can likely find a shop that can service imported 'big' bikes (250cc counts as big). But not anywhere on the island I'm on, the second biggest in the country.

Back to the EFI thing:
I'm very much in favor of EFI, in the first world.
In most cases, EFI goes along with other complexity, and in the third world forget trying to find basic parts or the tools to remove them for anything outside of the bikes sold there.

I was considering shipping my TE610E or VFR across, but I would have also needed a full set of spares and tools to maintain them.

The Husky I already had everything needed to strip the motor, but ultimately it's just easier to go with a local bike, most of which are 100cc to 150cc, with 125cc to 175cc 'business' bikes.

I would hardly ever be able to safely use the power, as the other traffic isn't expecting vehicles moving much faster than 50mph, and will overtake on blind corners and rises with that expectation in mind.

A bigger or faster bike doesn't buy you much, and has some significant downsides. There are a fair number of bigger imported bikes here, KTM, BMW, Ducati and others all have a dealer in the capital, and most of the Japanese manufacturers import a limited range of bigger bikes, but I've never seen one outside of the city or off the major paved roads. There are a few people using 250cc to 450cc enduros for fun (mostly expats) but I've not come across one yet.

Lots of the informal infrastructure is built around light sub-200 cc bikes. I've been in many places where the only access is via these small motorcycles, they transport everything on them or else buffalo. Sometimes there may have been a bridge, but when they get damaged, they will be repaired using a few planks, which I reckon a heavily loaded GS will break. Or they will just develop a ford and muscle the bikes through.

After Christmas, I went to visit a friend on a fairly big island that is only connected via banca, about 4 boats a day.
Getting my 200cc Chinabike down over the curbs and down the gang plank (at most 30" wide with a railing on one side) was as much the porters could handle. I reckon a GS or even a KLR would be very risky to load.
The whole bike got completely drenched with seawater on the way over as it was lashed to the railing with no protection.

Stripping down a simple, basic bike after that to clean it is way easier than one of the more complex modern marvels.

Add on bad or dirty gas, much rougher roads, and all the other challenges, and even today's ultra reliable machinery can pick up problems.


Sent from my Android chinaphone, please excuse the spelling

This is a most informative, excellent post.
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1999 KTM 640 ADV : : : : : : : 1993 Kawasaki KLX650
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Old 06-15-2013, 07:31 AM   #6563
8lives
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Earthscape View Post
This is a most informative, excellent post.
Yes I agree^^^^Thanks
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Old 06-15-2013, 07:50 PM   #6564
Nevada
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 8lives View Post
I think I need a change,KLR is just to big,it is my favorite all round bike Ive owned to date,But the KLX250 is looking pretty good,I really can't spring for a WR250,Im still a little uneasy about FI as the WR and the CRF have so the KLX is whats fitting the program at the moment and there seems to be a bunch of goodies available.Any thoughts??
You're in the Sierra Nevadas, unless you plan on never going down to the Central Valley, much less over to the coast, you'll see so much elevatiion change that FI will definitely be your friend.
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Old 06-16-2013, 07:51 AM   #6565
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Yes man the fi on the wr is awsome go for the wr its worth the extra cash I bought my 2012 wr bran new in sept of last year basically I owned it for 9 months now and have 12,534 miles on it now im in love with it
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Old 06-18-2013, 08:33 PM   #6566
Nanabijou
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Well I managed to load up the 2011 CBR150R tonight in preparation for the annual CBR125R gathering taking place near Bancroft, ON (north of Belleville, ON and about a 3 hr drive northeast of Toronto). From Thunder Bay, ON, I plan to stop at Rabbit Blanket Lake Provincial Park the first night (just past Wawa, ON), then backtrack and ride Hwy 101 toward Timmins and eventually end up at Finlayson Point Provincial Park (near Temagami) the second night. Then down to the meeting site near Bancroft on Friday. On the return - hope to camp at Windy Lake Provincial Park (near my hometown of Onaping, ON) along Hwy 144 and help out Ivanhoe Lake Provincial Park (near Foleyet, ON) by staying there overnight before the long return back to TBay.

Cleaned and lubed the chain, and changed the oil. Should be good to go for tomorrow.

Here's what the bike looks like with all the gear loaded up including the Hepco & Becker rear rack and Givi E55 Maxia top case. I'm taking the Ortlieb saddles on this trip too. Just purchased some Sidi Canyon boots from Excalibur Motorcycle Works here in Thunder Bay. These SHOULD actually be waterproof. Looking forward to the trip. Will write-up another trip report after I return.





Here's what my route down will look like. It's about 1000 miles to the gathering.



Mike
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Old 06-18-2013, 10:18 PM   #6567
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nanabijou View Post
Well I managed to load up the 2011 CBR150R tonight in preparation for the annual CBR125R gathering taking place near Bancroft, ON...

That's a great looking motorcycle! I love the orange wheels.

Spud
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Old 06-19-2013, 02:12 AM   #6568
Te Hopo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nanabijou View Post





Damn why can't they make one of these with a bit bigger single in them, like a 400-600.
With the lower power of a single they'd make a great bike for learner or anyone not wanting a highly strung 4cyl 600 and the torque combined with the handling would make it a hell of a canyon carver.
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Old 06-19-2013, 04:53 AM   #6569
NJ-Brett
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Wrong thread for wanting a bigger bike.
From what I read, the cbr250 does fine.
And they do make DR650's and KLR650's.
The DR is quite smooth, but getting a big single really smooth is hard to do, the DR has rubber mounted pegs and such.

And having plenty of power takes away some of the fun of riding smaller bikes.
Weight also goes up, and the mpg goes down.

There are plenty of multi cylinder sport bikes and other types of bikes with 300cc's and up that are smooth and well made.

I would not mind a TU350 though....


Quote:
Originally Posted by Te Hopo View Post
Damn why can't they make one of these with a bit bigger single in them, like a 400-600.
With the lower power of a single they'd make a great bike for learner or anyone not wanting a highly strung 4cyl 600 and the torque combined with the handling would make it a hell of a canyon carver.
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Old 06-19-2013, 05:22 AM   #6570
CMS
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Trip

Looking forword to your trip report and pictures. I love that bike ,colors are great. Are there side racks ava for Givi hard bags on the125/150 & 250 CBR's ? Terry
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