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Old 03-31-2007, 03:10 PM   #16
klm4755 OP
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As a aviation mechanically fastened joint rule, no threads should be at the shear plane (fay surface interface) or in bearing. I would say out of all the modifications and servicing I have performed on my KLR650 (the doo, oil screen, 400 watt rotor, electrical upgrades) the subframe drill thru was the most risky.
Keith
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Old 03-31-2007, 07:47 PM   #17
SWriverstone
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One more "clean shop" tip: when I was drilling out the frame, I used a small bungee cord and lashed the open end of my shop-vac tube right beneath the drill, then just let the shop-vac run while I was drilling—it worked great! Sucked up those metal shavings as they spewed out—no muss, no fuss!

Scott
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Old 04-01-2007, 01:10 AM   #18
Subcanis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by klm4755
As a aviation mechanically fastened joint rule, no threads should be at the shear plane (fay surface interface) or in bearing. I would say out of all the modifications and servicing I have performed on my KLR650 (the doo, oil screen, 400 watt rotor, electrical upgrades) the subframe drill thru was the most risky.
Keith
As a fellow aviation mechanic... I have to ask why? Its a simple procedure with easy instructions. No theads in shear...

Any boob with a decent drill and any kind of instruction following abillity can do this...
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Old 07-09-2007, 08:52 AM   #19
klm4755 OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Subcanis
As a fellow aviation mechanic... I have to ask why? Its a simple procedure with easy instructions. No theads in shear...

Any boob with a decent drill and any kind of instruction following abillity can do this...
No so sure I would agree with this statement. Breaking a drill mid-way thru this operation and/or not aligning the holes would be a major ordeal. Drilling steel is difficult, without a "real" piloted step drill.
Keithm
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Old 04-09-2013, 07:44 AM   #20
Keating
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Quote:
Originally Posted by klm4755 View Post
Saw this thread yesterday and headed out to the garage last night to size things up on my "new to me" '04 and discovered the left side of the bike looks exactly as pictured here.

One more mod I don't need to do, now.
I'll probably take the bolt out, mic it (verify it's the larger .39" bolt), regrease it and locktite it back in there.

The lower subframe bolts appear to have been done at one time, as the left side of the bike as a grade 12.9 hex drive, cap head bolt, but the right side has some cheesy zinc plated, flange head bolt, with no grade markings.

Will head over to the local fastener shop for a 12.9 replacement, forthwith.
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