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Old 11-16-2014, 06:44 PM   #1
floridarandy OP
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Parts to Replace When I Pull Tranny

92 R100GS PD new to me last year (3rd owner), approximately 65,000 miles. This year at Tech Day I plan to pull the transmission to lube the spline and inspect the clutch.

While I'm in the "back end" what "rubber" (o ring, boots, seals,etc) and/or gaskets, springs, etc make sense to replace on a preventive basis. Any bearings to replace here? What screws/fasteners should be replaced.

Any special tools needed?

Thanks in advance.

Randy in FLorida
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Old 11-16-2014, 07:18 PM   #2
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You'll need a thin walled socket to remove the swingarm pivot pin locknuts. A few brands of sockets are thin enough off the shelf, but a lot of people turn down a socket for this application or buy a modified one from cyclewerks. You'll need a relatively short (in height) 12 point 10mm box end wrench to get your driveshaft bolts off (the factory tool kit has a wrench for this). The allen bolt that holds your transmission on the lower right side is a pretty tight fit for just about any allen wrench, even the factory tool. You'll see. Your swingarm boot would be a good candidate for replacement if it's starting to get old and hard. Airbox rubbers also. Give your paralever pivot bearings a check as well as your driveshaft. Both are relatively likely failure items on paralever models.
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Old 11-16-2014, 07:44 PM   #3
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Some suggested items to have "just in case" would be the oil pump cover O-ring, new bolts connecting the driveshaft to the transmission, replacement parts for the throw-out bearing. How is the clutch cable? You might include a rear main seal in your spare parts, because once you get in there and discover it's leaking.... Then again you might not need some of those items, but you'll be glad to have them if you do need them.
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Old 11-16-2014, 08:16 PM   #4
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And chances are they will be needed someday.
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Old 11-17-2014, 04:49 AM   #5
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at 65k miles your non-serviceable driveshaft ujoints will need attention. best is to replace with serviceable ujoints with grease zerks. but that takes sending in to a rebuilder.

it's possible to remove sweged ujoints but you'll need more tools than the average wrench. tiny replacement ujoints are still available, some weld large washers to hold in new ujoint cups.

your ujoints came filled with grease .. at some point grease will be all used up .. when that happens ujoints will self destruct. this is no different than any other bearing.

BMW left off grease zerks so there's no easy way to refill full of grease. however it's possible to inject grease into ujoint cups with a grease needle. this will extend life of your driveshaft. Bruno's claims if you grease their new driveshaft every 9k miles, it will last lifetime of bike.

it's better to send your driveshaft to a rebuilder like Bruno's .. but for little to no additional costs I'd service your old driveshaft while it's out by injecting full of grease. which will extend life of your driveshaft.

notice the swege indents holding in ujoint cups. serviceable ujoints have circlips and grease zerk to refill with grease.

_cy_ screwed with this post 11-17-2014 at 06:38 AM
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Old 11-17-2014, 05:16 AM   #6
floridarandy OP
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May be lucky here. PO reports
zerk installed at time circlip added.
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Old 11-17-2014, 06:46 AM   #7
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Originally Posted by floridarandy View Post
May be lucky here. PO reports
zerk installed at time circlip added.
congrats ... looks like someone has already rebuilt driveshaft with serviceable ujoints. urethane bumpers are replaced by some of the driveshaft remfg.

BMW switched to non-serviceable driveshafts with paralever final drives. they have been known to go 125k+ miles .. some are not so lucky with ujoints failing early as 30k miles. off road duties extends flex angle of ujoints which normally requires extra service or shorter grease intervals.

HPN guy replaces rubber bushing/ujoints for 88-95 paralever for $450.



not room for zert to stay in place. but there's room for a service port in center of yoke.
in other words if BMW wanted to they could have made driveshaft Ujoints replaceable and serviceable.

BMW engineers did a really good job making these driveshafts all but impossible to service without a service facility.


_cy_ screwed with this post 11-17-2014 at 06:57 AM
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Old 11-17-2014, 09:46 AM   #8
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Parts List Attached

I want to order all the possible parts & bits that might be needed for this project. Here's what I have so far. What's obviously missing or clearly not needed? I'd rather send extra stuff back after the Tech Days that I didn't use.

Thanks

Randy in FLorida
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Old 11-17-2014, 12:22 PM   #9
Rob Farmer
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Pulling a Tranny has a whole different meaning on this side of the Atlantic
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Old 11-17-2014, 03:06 PM   #10
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I thought you were just going to pull the trannie? Now I see a complete transmission gasket set on your list? That is for taking the transmission apart. That is not a Tech Day job or even a one day job. Special tools needed, on the order of a $1000 worth of special tools to get it back together. And you will need a $2000 shop press?

If you think you are taking the transmission apart and still riding home you are wrong.

There are parts that if not needed now they will be needed someday. Don't waste time shipping parts back. (at least I never do)

Is there somebody at this Tech Day that will be helping you or you are just going to wail on it with the odd advice of passers by? Are there tools at this Tech Day? You have a complete on board tool roll?
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Old 11-17-2014, 06:02 PM   #11
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Got What I Was Asking For

Disston - Thanks for your honesty and although I'm enjoying learning I am, as should be obvious, a total newbie to the world of wrenching. My intention was not to crack the transmission case but to replace all the relevant the seals/gaskets/O-rings in the "exterior neighborhood" while the transmission is out.

I consider myself fortunate to have access to at least 2 significant, multi-day Tech Days here in Florida with folks who have significant shop equipment and experience to keep me from getting myself in trouble.

My goal here is to learn about these projects in advance of undertaking them so I can have a good general idea of where I'm trying to go and have all the parts available to make smart use of the time I get with guys smarter than me.

If I understand your suggesting I'd delete:

1. Set: Gasket Set Five Speed Gearbox

Anything else out of line?

I've pulled some more parts off the list (see revised list attached) that also seem unrelated. What about the 07119963300 Gasket?

Thanks
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Old 11-17-2014, 07:36 PM   #12
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Good idea to replace the fuel line while you have the airbox off.
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Old 11-17-2014, 10:48 PM   #13
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Good idea to replace the fuel line while you have the airbox off.
Yes, if you are using the original braided rubber fuel line. There are other materials that don't age as fast as the rubber line but a lot of us do use the braided cloth type. I use the braided cloth line too.

07119963300 is the oil drain plug metal washer. This is the same part on the transmission and the engine oil pan. Buy a dozen of these if you like. They will be used eventually. You are supposed to use a new drain plug gasket every time you change the oil.

11421337098 don't need. This crush washer on the dipstick never gets crushed so it doesn't wear out. If yours is bad then get a new one but you don't have to remove the transmission to replace the engine oil dipstick gasket.

11421264160 OK I see what you are doing now. Notice this part and the one above, 11421337098, are the same part in the picture. The one above "ended" and this part is the replacement. Again, you probably don't need a new dipstick gasket but if you do don't pull the transmission to replace it. You merely have to remove the dipstick to replace it.

11421336895 again we are back at engine oil. This is one of the parts in the engine oil filter set up. This is part of the $2,000 O-ring set up and is a critical part to understand. We have 6 or 7 page threads here about the $2,000 O-ring and it's associated parts. If you do not know what this part is or what the $2,000 O-ring is about then you are in danger of losing it big time. There is a measurement to make to make sure the $2,000 O-ring is properly compressed and the engine gets oil. (we call it "the $2,000 O-ring because that is how much it would cost to fix an engine with improper set up of the oil filter) Google this site and the $2,000 O-ring to find out more.
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Old 11-18-2014, 02:07 AM   #14
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I don't think you need to pull the clutch to check it. If the clutch works fine and does not slip you don't have to pull it apart. These clutches last a long time. If it's not slipping leave it alone.

Another reason you may have to pull the clutch is if the rear main oil seal is leaking. Is it? If it is there will be oil on the shelf under the transmission. Oil on the shelf is either from the rear main oil seal, the oil pump O-ring or the transmission front seal. No oil on the shelf then none of those are leaking and you can leave all of them alone. Look under the trans. See the shelf? Is it wet with oil? no oil, no leak.

At 65K miles there is most likely no problems with any of this stuff. If it is not slipping or leaking then leave it alone. The only thing it looks like to me that you are going to do is lube the transmission input splines. (and I guess the paralever drive shaft gets lubed? but I don't know about that). By all means do this and learn how to deal with pulling the transmission. Take the swing arm off and have the tools and know how to do this. Someday when there is more serious work to do then you will be familiar with half the job.
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Old 11-18-2014, 05:15 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by disston View Post
I don't think you need to pull the clutch to check it. If the clutch works fine and does not slip you don't have to pull it apart. These clutches last a long time. If it's not slipping leave it alone.

Another reason you may have to pull the clutch is if the rear main oil seal is leaking. Is it? If it is there will be oil on the shelf under the transmission. Oil on the shelf is either from the rear main oil seal, the oil pump O-ring or the transmission front seal. No oil on the shelf then none of those are leaking and you can leave all of them alone. Look under the trans. See the shelf? Is it wet with oil? no oil, no leak.

At 65K miles there is most likely no problems with any of this stuff. If it is not slipping or leaking then leave it alone. The only thing it looks like to me that you are going to do is lube the transmission input splines. (and I guess the paralever drive shaft gets lubed? but I don't know about that). By all means do this and learn how to deal with pulling the transmission. Take the swing arm off and have the tools and know how to do this. Someday when there is more serious work to do then you will be familiar with half the job.
Thanks Diston for the continued input. I need it! My goal is to learn more about how these things go together and prevent the preventable problems so easily addressed with proper lubrication, adjustment and sealing. As I have occasion to take something apart to access an inner part to lube I want to know what to check along the way and what to replace that is cheap and easy (seals, etc).

These Tech Days are a special part of the opportunity to own these machines and learn from others who not only know them mechanically but enjoy sharing with the newbies so they might also learn and pass it on.

All thoughts and recommendations are welcome.

Randy in FLorida
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